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If I have two tables:

Actor:
ID | Name
1  : Patrick
3  : Emma
7  : Vanessa

Singer:
ID | Name
4  : Will
5  : Madonna
13 : Emma

Can I generate the following table from an SQL query, which contains the table name each record came from?

ID | Career | Name
1  : Actor  : Patrick
3  : Actor  : Emma
4  : Singer : Will
5  : Singer : Madonna
7  : Actor  : Emma
13 : Singer : Emma

I'm assuming the ID column items are unique across the two tables, but not the names.

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Bad DB design or bad sample. The same person can be an actor and a singer. –  Viktor Jevdokimov Oct 8 '09 at 13:10
2  
Tell that to the people on broadway –  Yannick Motton Oct 8 '09 at 13:12
    
chortle chortle. –  John McAleely Oct 10 '09 at 10:37
    
It would appear that no-one has actually answered the question though. None of the responses use the table name, preferring instead to use constants that happen to be the same. –  John McAleely Oct 10 '09 at 10:38
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6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted
select ID, 'Actor' as Career, Name from Actor
union all
select ID, 'Singer' as Career, Name from Singer

Or something along these lines.

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I'm accepting this answer, but I note that it doesn't actually answer the question. The table name does not appear in the result, rather there is a constant that happens to be the same. I'm assuming my actual question can't be answered in SQL. –  John McAleely Oct 16 '09 at 13:29
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OK, two people beat me to the sample query I was posting.

But, I think the better answer to your root question is, if "Career" is a relevant attribute in your data, and the IDs are expected to be unique, why not have one table in which Career is an actual column?

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+1 While others, as me (already deleted), were answered as asked, this one is the best answer, actually. –  Viktor Jevdokimov Oct 8 '09 at 13:07
1  
Normalization is for suckers :p This is the eternal tradeoff between answering the question, or solving his problem :) –  Yannick Motton Oct 8 '09 at 13:11
    
It's part of a larger problem, reduced for the purposes of asking a question on SO. I'm trying to figure out a minimally disruptive way of adding a minor feature. –  John McAleely Oct 10 '09 at 10:39
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SELECT ID, 'Actor' AS Career, Name FROM Actor
UNION
SELECT ID, 'Singer' AS Career, Name FROM Singer
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1  
It's a nitpick, but you should use UNION ALL if you don't need duplicates removed. –  Dave Costa Oct 8 '09 at 13:02
    
It's not a nitpick. You are exactly right. If there were a unique constraint on (Id, Name) UNION ALL would effectively yield the same result as UNION, but only faster. But honestly I wouldn't care for duplicate records in this case. –  Yannick Motton Oct 8 '09 at 13:08
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Since you know the table names you're querying from you can simply include the table name as a literal value in the result set:

SELECT ID, 'Actor', Name FROM Actor
  UNION SELECT ID, 'Singer', Name FROM Singer;
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Try:

select id, 'Actor' as Career, Name
from Actor
union
select id, 'Singer' as Career, Name
from Singer
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This is not ideal either but it does answer your question assuming the database has only two tables.

declare @t1 nvarchar(10) = (SELECT top 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES) declare @t2 nvarchar(10) = (SELECT top 1 TABLE_NAME FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TABLES where not TABLE_NAME = @t1 )

declare @SQLcommand nvarchar(400)

set @SQLcommand = 'select ID, '+ @t1 +' as Career, Name from ' + @t1 + ' union all select ID, '+ @t2 +' as Career, Name from ' +@t2

exec(@SQLcommand)

I agree with above that the design really does need to get looked at for you to need this.

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