Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →
+--------------------+
|                    |
|                    |
|                    |
|                    |
|         1          |
|                    |
|                    |
|                    |
|                    |
+--------------------+
|                    |
|                    |
|                    |
|                    |
|         2          |
|                    |
|                    |
|                    |
|                    |
+--------------------+

Contents of (1) as shown above are unknown, as it may increase or decrease in dynamically generated pages. The second div (2) as shown above, should fill the remaining space.

here is an example of my html

<div id="full">
<!--contents of 1 -->
<div id="someid">
<!--contents of 2 -->
</div>
</div>

css...

#full{width: 300px; background-color: red;}
#someid{height: 100%;}

Or is this method wrong? How should I do this? please see my demo and show me my mistake.

share|improve this question
    
Do you want the height of 1 + 2 to be the exact height of the viewport? Or 2 is the same size as the viewport and it scrolls down equal to the height of 1? – thgaskell Mar 13 '13 at 3:54
    
height of 1 I don't know, and remaining of 1 then 2 be full height. – Bhojendra Nepal Mar 13 '13 at 3:56
    
@C-Link Nowcheck to this demo i think u want to this tinkerbin.com/6V6X0uAw – Rohit Azad Mar 13 '13 at 4:06
    
@C-Link What do you mean by height:100% ? Do you mean the div should occupy the remaining height? – Mr_Green Mar 13 '13 at 4:37
    
@Mr_Green yes! remaining height. – Bhojendra Nepal Mar 13 '13 at 5:00
up vote 17 down vote accepted

You should be able to do this if you add in a div (#header below) to wrap your contents of 1.

  1. If you float #header, the content from #someid will be forced to flow around it.

  2. Next, you set #header's width to 100%. This will make it expand to fill the width of the containing div, #full. This will effectively push all of #someid's content below #header since there is no room to flow around the sides anymore.

  3. Finally, set #someid's height to 100%, this will make it the same height as #full.

JSFiddle

HTML

<div id="full">
    <div id="header">Contents of 1</div>
    <div id="someid">Contents of 2</div>
</div>

CSS

html, body, #full, #someid {
  height: 100%;
}

#header {
  float: left;
  width: 100%;
}

Update

I think it's worth mentioning that flexbox is well supported across modern browsers today. The CSS could be altered have #full become a flex container, and #someid should set it's flex grow to a value greater than 0.

html, body, #full {
  height: 100%;
}

#full {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
}

#someid {
  flex-grow: 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
please se my **demo and rectify it where is mistake. – Bhojendra Nepal Mar 13 '13 at 6:05
    
I think you are right but my problem couldn't be solved but anyway this helped me to understand about this. So I'm accepting your answer. – Bhojendra Nepal Mar 14 '13 at 2:59
    
Your answer works beautifully, but I am slightly confused as to why it works: If you play with the background colors, you can see that #someid is ALWAY equal to the height of #full, despite the height of #header. Logically, the content of #someid should start at the top of #full. Why does #header push the content down? – Hunter S Oct 10 '15 at 19:00
2  
The problem with this is it makes #someid the same height as #full, so #someid overflows #full by the height of #header. It doesn't set #someid to 100% of the remaining space. If you set overflow: scroll; on #someid you would see the problem. – Old Pro Nov 17 '15 at 22:25
2  
Yeah, this answer should be updated. It was a hack that abused the fact that float pushed content down, which was a "good enough" at the time when dealing with browsers that didn't support things like calc and flexbox layouts weren't widely supported. Look how far we've come in less than 3 years! – thgaskell Nov 18 '15 at 0:25

To get a div to 100% height on a page, you will need to set each object on the hierarchy above the div to 100% as well. for instance:

html { height:100%; }
body { height:100%; }
#full { height: 100%; }
#someid { height: 100%; }

Although I cannot fully understand your question, I'm assuming this is what you mean.

This is the example I am working from:

<html style="height:100%">
    <body style="height:100%">
        <div style="height:100%; width: 300px;">
            <div style="height:100%; background:blue;">

            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

Style is just a replacement for the CSS which I haven't externalised.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry! this method doesn't work. I already did it. – Bhojendra Nepal Mar 13 '13 at 3:49
    
which element do you want to be 100% height? and in relation to what? – Serdalis Mar 13 '13 at 3:52
    
(2) should be 100% in height. Your method may work in without wrapper but I'm using a wrapper. – Bhojendra Nepal Mar 13 '13 at 3:54
    
if you want someid to also be 100% then you have to add 100% to it, and set the container to 100% too. I've edited my question to show this. – Serdalis Mar 13 '13 at 3:56
    
I already said it may not work coz I use a wrapper and then setting it to 100% also don't work. – Bhojendra Nepal Mar 13 '13 at 3:59

This can be done with tables:

<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" height="100%">
    <tr height="0%"><td>
        <div id="full">
            <!--contents of 1 -->
        </div>
    </td></tr>
    <tr><td>
        <div id="someid">
            <!--contents of 2 -->
        </div>
    </td></tr>
</table>

Then apply css to make someid fill the remaining space:

#someid {
    height: 100%;
}

Now, I can just hear the angry shouts from the crowd, "Oh noes, he's using tables! Feed him to the lions!" Please hear me out.

Unlike the accepted answer which accomplishes nothing aside from making the container div the full height of the page, this solution makes div #2 fill the remaining space as requested in the question. If you need that second div to fill the full height allotted to it, this is currently the only way to do it.

But feel free to prove me wrong, of course! CSS is always better.

share|improve this answer

I added this for pages that were too short.

html:

<section id="secondary-foot"></section>

css:

section#secondary-foot {
    height: 100%;
    background-color: #000000;
    position: fixed;
    width: 100%;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried this in @BhojendraNepal's JSFiddle, but couldn't get it to work. Could you show in you own JSFiddle or describe where you added your element? – Dag Høidahl May 7 '15 at 19:39

I know this is a late entry but even in 2016 I am surprised by the complete lack of IE support for flex (currently 11 is the only one to support it and its majorly buggy at that http://caniuse.com/#feat=flexbox) which from a business perspective is not great! So I think until IE is shut down the best solution and most cross-browser friendly one surely must be a JS/Jquery one?

Most sites already use Jquery and a very simple example (for my code) is:

$('#auto_height_item').height($(window).height() - $('#header').height());

You can obviously replace window and header and let the basic math do the work. Personally I'm still not convinced about flex yet...

share|improve this answer

If your spaces need to fix exactly the borders of the screen you can try

make a big div with :

top:0; 
bottom:0;
margin:0px auto; 

and inside make 2 divs with

height:50%; 
margin:0px auto;

It's very similar to the approach of thgaskell, but it's more flexible and CSS3 compliant. You can try to have a merge and test it to see if it fits best on all orientations and devices you need.

share|improve this answer

    html,
    body {
        height: 100%;
    }

    .parent {
        display: flex;
        flex-flow:column;
        height: 100%;
        background: white;
    }

    .child-top {
        flex: 0 1 auto;
        background: pink;
    }

    .child-bottom {
        flex: 1 1 auto;
        background: green;
    }
    <div class="parent">
        <div class="child-top">
          This child has just a bit of content
        </div>
        <div class="child-bottom">
          And this one fills the rest
        </div>
    </div>

share|improve this answer
    
Could you please elaborate a bit on this code-only answer? Thanks! – arkascha Feb 15 at 13:59
    
Hello @arkascha, I've just updated my post with a working code example. Thanks for the suggestion. Cheers. – Ernesto Hegi Feb 16 at 15:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.