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I am trying to overload the ifstream operator >> in order to read from a text file and place the data in a class belonging to State.

The format of the file I am reading from is Name of State > State Capital > Population. I just want to read the name of the state into the array.

I have been having trouble with operator overloading. I somewhat understand it and was able to make the ostream work, but reading in has proven to be more difficult.

Not sure if it makes a difference, but this is for a school assignment and I am still working on it. Just not sure where to go from here.

main.cpp

This is my main CPP file.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <fstream>
#include "State.h"

using namespace std;

int main(){

    State s, h;

    string null;

    ifstream fin("states.txt");

    while(fin.good())
    {   
        fin >> h;       //This doesn't read anything in. 
        fin >> null;    //Dumping the Capital City to a null string
        fin >> null;    //Dumping the Population to a null string   
    }

    cout << s;          //Testing my overloaded << operator

    system("pause");

    return 0;

}

State.cpp

This is a secondary CPP file.

#include "State.h"
#include <fstream>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

    using namespace std;

int i = 0;
string name, x, y;

State::State()
{
    arrayStates[50];
}

//Trying to overload the input from fstream
ifstream& operator >> (ifstream& in, State h)
{
    for(i = 0; i < 21; i++)
    {
        in >> h.arrayStates[i];
    }
    return in;
}

ostream& operator << (ostream& out, State s)
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 21; i++)
    {
        out << s.arrayStates[i] << endl;
    }
    return out;
}

State.h

This is my header file that contains my class.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

class State{
private:
    string arrayStates[50];
public:
    State();
    friend ostream& operator << (ostream& out, State s);
    friend ifstream& operator >> (ifstream& in, State h);
};
share|improve this question
    
The constructor is pointless, you're inputting one thing and outputting another, you're passing by value, operator>> usually takes a std::istream &, and your array is bigger than what you use it for. –  chris Mar 13 '13 at 4:40
    
Why is the constructor pointless? And yes, I am trying to input the names of my states into the array and then later output the entire array. I know the operator >> usually takes a std::istream but I thought it would be ifstream in this case since I am trying to read from a file. Is that incorrect? And the array is meant to be bigger. I just need it set up and 50 was a around number. Just have to have it big enough for everything to get read in from the file. –  karadorde Mar 13 '13 at 4:51
    
The constructor is pointless because the array of strings is initialized to empty strings anyway, and this one just accesses an out-of-bounds element. This constructor would also be implicitly there if you took it out. You can still pass an ifstream & into an istream & because the former is derived from the latter. –  chris Mar 13 '13 at 5:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The error is in this function, as you suggest.

ifstream& operator >> (ifstream& in, State h)
{
    for(i = 0; i < 21; i++)
    {
        in >> h.arrayStates[i];
    }
    return in;
}

That function makes a temporary copy of your State, calls the copy h, and initializes that copy.

Pass the original State by reference instead. So it refers to the same object.

ifstream& operator >> (ifstream& in, const State &h)
share|improve this answer
    
Trying to work with this. It is still giving me some errors but at least it gives me something to try. Thank you, sir. –  karadorde Mar 13 '13 at 11:45

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