Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a program using C just to find the max and min numbers from my input file that contains about 500 floating numbers such as 54.54. I can get the program to run but the output says my min is 0 and my max is 54.88 which is the very first number from the file. Here is what i have so far.

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    FILE * fp;

    fp=fopen("file.txt","r");
    if (fp==NULL)
    {
        printf("Failed to open");
    }

    float i;
    float min ;
    float max ;

    {
        fscanf( fp, "%f", &i);

        if (i < min)
            min = i;
        if (i > max)
            max = i;
        }
    printf("Data range is: %f  %f \n", min, max);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Maybe you should consider looping through the file and not just reading the first number? Possibly with a while loop until the end of the file? – Benjamin Gruenbaum Mar 13 '13 at 4:42
    
@Aniket: your comment is ambiguous. It might mean "No; in fact, floats are default initialized to zero", or it might mean "Floats are never initialized to zero by default". The latter is more nearly accurate for automatic and dynamically allocated float variables; the former more nearly accurate for static and external variables. I suspect there's been some cleanup work done on the comments, so it may just be best to delete your comment (and let me know to delete this one). – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 5:30
    
@JonathanLeffler I meant floats are always 0 initialized. There was a comment by ACB when I posted that - which said he has to initialize float values and I said nope - not necessary :-) – Aniket Mar 13 '13 at 5:31
1  
@Aniket: local (automatic) variables must be initialized. They are only zeroed by accident. You will actually often get away with it in main(), but you usually won't get away with it in functions called from main(), because the stack is zeroed when main() is invoked, but not when functions are called after other functions have stored values on the stack (and subsequently returned). But it is pure bad luck that you get away with; C says that the behaviour is undefined, and you initialize variables before use. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 5:44
1  
Ok. WTH is the sudden love-affair with arrays in the answers below when in the end all you care about is two values ? The OP's code was actually closer to the end-game. – WhozCraig Mar 13 '13 at 6:00

The min / max should be initialized to proper values. Eg.

float inf = 1.0 / 0.0;  // also in math.h as INFINITY?
float max = -inf;
float min = inf;
float i;

Another option is to initialize min and max to the first value read from the file. And this is one way to code a loop:

while (fscanf(fp, "%f", &i)==1)   // 
{
   ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
The core information here is a little scanty but it is accurate, so I'll give you an up-vote too, despite my comment to WhozCraig's answer. And your comments on another answer were on target too. Well done. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 6:11

Keeping most of your code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    float i=0, min=0, max=0;
    FILE * fp fp=fopen("file.txt","r");
    if (fp==NULL)
    {
        perror("Failed to open file.");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
    }

    if (fscanf(fp,"%f", &i) == 1)
    {
        min = max = i;
        while (fscanf( fp, "%f", &i) == 1)
        {
            if (i < min)
                min = i;
            else if (i > max)
                max = i;
        }
    }

    printf("Data range is: %f  %f \n", min, max);
    return 0;
}

Sorry for any typos.

share|improve this answer
    
Yay! An up-votable answer! – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 6:07
1  
@JonathanLeffler Pfft. it was killing me watching this thread =P – WhozCraig Mar 13 '13 at 6:08

This program will fit the bill.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() 
{
    float num;
    float min = 999.99; /*Max value of number your file will not exceed*/
    float max = 0;
    int i = 0;

    FILE *fp;
    fp = fopen("file.txt", "r");

     while(fscanf(fp,"%f",&num) == 1)
     {
          if (num < min)
             min = num;
          if (num > max)
             max = num;
     }

    fclose(fp);

    printf("Data range is: %f  %f \n", min, max);

    return 0; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please do not use feof() like that; C is not Pascal. Also, check the return value from fscanf(): while (fscanf(fp, "%f, &float_var) == 1) (assuming float float_var;). Note that the problem speaks of 500 numbers; an array of size 10 is inadequate for holding all the numbers. However, intriguingly, your code won't crash and burn; that's because you set i to 0 and you never increment it, so you only use the zeroth element of the array, so 10 was too big after all. In C, constants are conventionally written in ALL CAPS: enum { NUM_ELEMENTS = 500 };, for example. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 6:06
    
@JonathanLeffler Thanks for the corrections (was not aware of feof()) , i will look into it immediately and make appropriate changes – Barath Bushan Mar 13 '13 at 6:12
    
@JonathanLeffler , you were right , using an array was useless , all it took was one variable , the program works fine , but i still have to find a suitable replacement for 'feof()' , keeping the logic intact. – Barath Bushan Mar 13 '13 at 6:20
    
The trouble with while (!feof(fp)) is that the fscanf() that follows can still fail when it tries to read a character when there are none left to read — so it can encounter EOF before feof() reports it. The standard trick is to try the I/O operation, and if it fails or is incomplete, then use feof() and ferror() to distinguish what went wrong. So, in my original comment, I suggested: float f; while (fscanf(fp, "%f", &f) == 1) { ...body of loop... } to check that fscanf() read one value (the only conversion specification), and continues with the loop if all was OK; else it stops. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 6:25
    
Always check the result of fscanf() and family. In depressingly close to 30 years of C programming, I've really used feof() so seldom I can probably still count the times on my fingers without needing to use my toes too. It's there; it just isn't needed 99.9% of the time. (3 source files I've written use it — and two of those I'm surprised to find it in — out of around multiple thousands of files total; the raw file count was 19,000, but that included 'not my files' and both RCS files and checked out files, for example. It is not used often—there were less than a dozen other uses of it). – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 6:35

You don't have a loop of reading all the numbers in the file. What you get is just the first one.

share|improve this answer
    
i am not sure what to put in the for loop for the 2nd condition where the ? mark is for(i=0; i<?; i++) – mogley Mar 13 '13 at 5:05

Here's one way you could do it, if you know you will have exactly one double on each line. It's maybe not the most elegant, but compiling it in my head it seems like it would get the job done.

(I have not bug-tested this code, and also I'm not sure if that's the right macro for the maximum and minimum double values)

char buf[10]; /* as big as the biggest number */
char c;
int i = 0;
double d, dmax = -INFINITY, dmin = INFINITY;

while ((c = getc(fp)) != EOF) {
    if (c != '\n')
        buf[i++] = c;
    else {
        buf[i] = '\0';
        d = atof(buf);
        if (d > dmax) dmax = d;
        if (d < dmin) dmin = d;
        i = 0;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In C99, <math.h> defines INFINITY which will be a positive infinity if the FPU supports them, so you're probably good to go. The other trick (avoiding infinities) is to read a first value and assign it to both dmax and dmin; thereafter, compare the new values with those saved values. Both work quite well; they're equivalent if there's at least one number to read. Of course, your code is vulnerable to buffer overflows; if I type 3.14159265389 in, I've written beyond the bounds of buf. That buffer should be much larger. You could consider scanf() or use fgets() and sscanf(). – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 5:35
    
Yeah, I took a (conservative) guess on how big the buffer should be, but the implementer should be able to fix it accordingly. – limp_chimp Mar 13 '13 at 5:39
    
Hmmm...interesting; my version of a conservative guess would have started at 256 and gone up by powers of two to 4096; that (4096) is what I use to store a line when I can't be bothered to check for overflows (but I use fgets() to read the line, which avoids overflows; I simply don't usually bother to detect that the end of line did not appear in the first 4095 characters). Clearly, if your machine only has KiB of memory, then you worry about it; if it has MiB or GiB of memory, 4096 is small change. – Jonathan Leffler Mar 13 '13 at 5:48
    
Good point. It's good to hear from a veteran programmer on this - sometimes I'm over-conservative on things like this, and that's probably a good habit to break :) – limp_chimp Mar 13 '13 at 5:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.