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How do I create a jQuery plugin so that I can use namespaces in my plugin ?

$("#id1").amtec.foo1();
$("#id1").amtec.foo2();

None of these seem to work.

(function($) {
    var amtec = {
        $.fn.foo1 : function(){ return this.each(function(){}); },
        $.fn.foo2 : function(){ return this.each(function(){}); }
        };

    })(jQuery);
(function($) {
    $.fn.amtec = function(){
        var foo1 = function(){ return this.each(function(){}); };
        var foo2 = function(){ return this.each(function(){}); };
        }
    })(jQuery);
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would you please check out my solution. it's more accurate to what you are trying to achieve. –  qwfddq Oct 28 at 16:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted
(function($) {
    $.fn.amtec = function () {
        var jq = this;
        return {
            foo1: function(){
                return jq.each(function(){});
            },

            foo2: function(){
                return jq.each(function(){});
           }
       }
    };
})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
    
Alexander, error console in FireBug shows : this.each is not a function –  MotionGrafika Oct 8 '09 at 14:14
    
I guess I messed things up - I've updated my answer. –  Alex Gyoshev Oct 8 '09 at 18:49
    
Thanks a lot Alexandar ! It does work but as $("#id1").amtec().foo1(); and not as $("#id1").amtec.foo2(); –  MotionGrafika Oct 9 '09 at 5:07
    
well, I guess it's inevitable - because you need to preserve the this reference, and you cannot get it within an instantiated object. –  Alex Gyoshev Oct 9 '09 at 8:01
    
You just saved my day! –  nagylzs Nov 27 '13 at 17:51

I know I'm almost three years late to the party, but hopefully future readers of this question can benefit from my answer. The answer by GSto looks great from a jQuery plugin design standpoint, but has one small issue: calling mynamespace() clobbers the returned jQuery instance with new methods. Here is an example of that being an issue:

$myDiv = $('.mydiv');
$myDiv.mynamespace().height(); // this will be `height' from mynamespace
$myDiv.height();               // this will STILL be `height' from mynamespace
                               //   because it has overwritten $myDiv.height

The chosen answer does not have this issue because there amtec() is not a jQuery instance and is instead an object that calls its methods with the jQuery instance as context. I have taken concepts from both answers and written the namespace plugin below:

(function($) {
  $.namespace = function(namespaceName, closures) {

    if ($.fn[namespaceName] === undefined) {
      $.fn[namespaceName] = function executor(context) {
        if (this instanceof executor) {
          this.__context__ = context;
        }
        else {
          return new executor(this);
        }
      };
    }

    $.each(closures, function(closureName, closure) {
      $.fn[namespaceName].prototype[closureName] = function() {
        closure.apply(this.__context__, arguments);
      };
    });

  };
})(jQuery);

Example usage:

$.namespace('milosz', {
    redify: function() {
        $(this).css('color', '#ff0000');
    },
    greenify: function() {
        $(this).css('color', '#00ff00');
    }
});

$.namespace('milosz', {
    blueify: function() {
        $(this).css('color', '#0000ff');
    }
});

$('.mydiv').milosz().redify(); // The HTML elements with class `mydiv' are now red

The code uses some pretty low-level details of JavaScript that are well-explained by John Resig's Advanced JavaScript tutorial, but loosely speaking what is happening in the example is this:

When milosz (internally $.fn[namespaceName]) is called, this points to the jQuery instance returned by $('.mydiv'). Hence, the if statement falls through to the else block and the constructor version of milosz is called (referred-to internally as executor for reasons that are about to become apparent). The constructor is passed a single parameter: this, a pointer to the jQuery the instance that is going to be the execution context for all members of the milosz namespace. We enter back into the if statement, this time executing the first block, wherein the passed-in jQuery instance is stored in a member variable called __context__ (which hopefully has a low chance of being overwritten). The constructed object is returned, complete with a reference to the original jQuery instance and any wrappers added to its prototype by invocations of $.namespace. These wrappers simply execute the methods passed into the milosz namespace with the original jQuery object as context, as happens when redify is executed.

Bah, I know it's a mouthful, anyway the point is it works like the accepted answer but looks like the jQueryish answer, which to me is the best of both worlds.

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1  
Great approach, thanks from a year after, three years after the party. –  cmsjr Oct 18 '12 at 16:45
1  
I will be using this technique in my new jQuery plugin factory library. Makes my head hurt, but it works! –  Greg Franko May 24 '13 at 19:02
    
I know it has been a while, but this method doesn't allow me to call a function as $.myNamespace().function() - but it works as $().myNamespace().function() - anybody have a solution to this? –  Nick Barone May 14 at 1:54
1  
@NickBarone, that is a solution to a different problem. Here we specifically wanted to give namespaces to jQuery instances, not to the jQuery object itself. I believe if you simply replace all instances of $.fn in the above code with $ you will have what you need. However, if you don't need the namespace to be a function you can simply do $.myNamespace = {}; $.myNamespace.func = function() { return 'bar'; }; to get a "namespace" effect. –  Milosz May 17 at 4:49
(function($){
  $.namespace = function(ns, functions){
    $.fn[ns] = function() {return this.extend(functions)};
  };
  $.namespace('$', $.fn); // the default namespace
})(jQuery);

So now you can have a plugin:

$.fn.func = function(){alert('plugin'); return this'};

and create plugins in a namespace:

$.namespace ('mynamespace', {
  func: function() {alert('namespaced plugin'); return this;},
  otherfunc: function() {return this.css('color', 'yellow');}
});

And if you do

$('div').func(); // alerts 'plugin' -- no namespace

But

$('div').mynamespace().func(); // alerts 'namespaced plugin'

And

$('div').mynamespace().func().$().func(); // alerts 'namespaced

plugin', then resets to the normal jquery and alerts 'plugin'

share|improve this answer
    
To call otherFunc would it jsut be $(div).mynamespace.otherFunc(); ? –  Chris Feb 1 '11 at 1:16
    
Be careful with this. Clever answer but behaves more like the Decorator Pattern than a Namespace. That could could get you into trouble if you're not familiar with the usual pros & cons of that pattern. –  colllin Feb 26 '13 at 20:55

I know it's an old question... But why write all this extra code when you can just replace . with _?

$.fn.amtec_foo1 = function(){ return this.each(function(){}); }
$.fn.amtec_foo2 = function(){ return this.each(function(){}); }

Better yet, give your plugin a name that's original & project agnostic.

$.fn.fooize = function(){ return this.html('Element has been Fooized!'); }
share|improve this answer
    
That polutes the namespace, and doesn't look at all good. –  Hugo Jul 23 '12 at 21:22
    
refreshingly pragmatic. thanks! –  colllin Feb 26 '13 at 5:43
 $.cg = {
  foo1: function(weq){
      return console.log(weq);
  },
  foo2: function(rw){
      return console.log(rw);
 }
}; 
$.cg = { // will result in error because $.cg is already declared above

  foo4: function(rw){ // will result in error
      return console.log(rw); // will result in error
 } // will result in error
}; // will result in error

$.cg.foo3 = function(weq){ //to add anything new to $.cg , you have to do it this way.
      return console.log(weq);
  }

$.cg.foo1("12");
$.cg.foo2("22"); //works fine.
$.cg.foo3("112"); //works fine.
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