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A Brute Force approach is not intended to solve to question but aid in its research. I am working on a Project Euler problem that has me finding all the numbers from X to one less than Y that have have exactly one "substring" divisible by the number of digits in a number.

These are called one-child numbers. 104 is a one-child number. Of its substrings, [1, 0, 4, 10, 04, 104] only 0 is divisible by 3. The question asks to find the amount of one-child numbers that occur less then 10*17. A brute force method is not the correct approach; however, I have a theory that requires me to know the amount of one child numbers occuring before 10*11.

I haven't been successful in finding this number even after leaving my laptop on for half a day. I tried Cython, put i am a novice programmer who knows nothing about C. The result was really bad. I even tried cloud computing, but my ssh pipe always breaks before the process is complete.

If someone could help me pinpoint some different approaches to or optimization for preforming a BRUTE FORCE method for this problem up to 10**11, it would be greatly appreciated.

PLEASE DO NOT...

lend me advice on number theory or your answers to this problem, as I have been working on it for a good deal of time, and I really wish to come to the conclusion on my own.

## a one child number has only one "substring" divisable by the
## number of digits in the number. Example: 104 is a one child number as 0
## is the only substring which 3 may divide, of the set [1,0,4,10,04,104]

## FYI one-child numbers are positive, so the number 0 is not one-child


from multiprocessing import Pool
import os.path

def OneChild(numRange): # hopefully(10*11,1)
    OneChild = []
    start = numRange[0]
    number = numRange[1]

    ## top loop handles one number at a time
    ## loop ends when start become larger then end
    while number >= start:

        ## preparing to analayze one number
        ## for exactly one divisableSubstrings
        numberString = str(start)
        numDigits = len(numberString)
        divisableSubstrings = 0
        ticker1,ticker2 = 0, numDigits

        ## ticker1 starts at 0 and ends at number of digits - 1
        ## ticker2 starts at number of digits and ends +1 from ticker1
        ## an example for a three digit number: (0,3) (0,2) (0,1) (1,3) (1,2) (2,3)
        while ticker1 <= numDigits+1:
            while ticker2 > ticker1:
                if int(numberString[ticker1:ticker2]) % numDigits == 0:
                    divisableSubstrings += 1
                    if divisableSubstrings == 2:
                        ticker1 = numDigits+1
                        ticker2 = ticker1

                ##Counters    
                ticker2 -= 1
            ticker1 += 1
            ticker2 = numDigits             
        if divisableSubstrings == 1: ## One-Child Bouncer 
            OneChild.append(start) ## inefficient but I want the specifics
        start += 1 
    return (OneChild)

## Speed seems improve with more pool arguments, labeled here as cores
## Im guessing this is due to pypy preforming best when task is neither
## to large nor small
def MultiProcList(numRange,start = 1,cores = 100): # multiprocessing
    print "Asked to use %i cores between %i numbers: From %s to %s" % (cores,numRange-start, start,numRange)
    cores = adjustCores(numRange,start,cores)
    print "Using %i cores" % (cores)

    chunk = (numRange+1-start)/cores
    end = chunk+start -1 
    total, argsList= 0, []
    for i in range(cores):
        # print start,end-1
        argsList.append((start,end-1))
        start, end = end , end + chunk
    pool = Pool(processes=cores)
    data = pool.map(OneChild,argsList)
    for d in data:
        total += len(d)
    print total

##    f = open("Result.txt", "w+")
##    f.write(str(total))
##    f.close()

def adjustCores(numRange,start,cores):
    if start == 1:
        start = 0
    else:
        pass
    while (numRange-start)%cores != 0:
        cores -= 1
    return cores

#MultiProcList(10**7)
from timeit import Timer
t = Timer(lambda: MultiProcList(10**6))
print t.timeit(number=1)
share|improve this question
    
Why are you using a bruteforce approach? –  Blender Mar 13 '13 at 6:46
    
He's only using brute force for a tiny subset of the problem, then number theory for the actual solution –  max k. Mar 13 '13 at 6:47
2  
The most efficient approach that I can come up with takes 15 seconds to get through 10**7, even with PyPy. I really doubt there's a way to bruteforce this. –  Blender Mar 13 '13 at 6:59
    
Have you run it through any testing software to see what's taking up the most time? VisualStudio has a pretty good one from memory –  max k. Mar 13 '13 at 7:00
1  
@max k is completely correct. The the solutions to 10**i (i being a prime) have large prime divisors that lead to smaller primes if pi() is preformed. The divisors for 10**i i=[2,3,5,7] sequentially require +1 pi operations to reach a non prime. These non primes also have an underlying order. The problem is that 7 and 5 are the only numbers, in which their strange prime devisors are smaller than the solution. I suspect that 2 and 5 wont give me the info i am after because they divide 10 evenly. Having a third prime number that dousnt divide ten will make things alot more clear. Plz! dont spoil –  James Beezho Mar 13 '13 at 7:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is my fastest brute force code. It use cython to speedup the calculation. Instead of check all the numbers, it finds all the One-Child numbers by recursion.

%%cython
cdef int _one_child_number(int s, int child_count, int digits_count):
    cdef int start, count, c, child_count2, s2, part, i
    if s >= 10**(digits_count-1):
        return child_count
    else:
        if s == 0:
            start = 1
        else:
            start = 0
        count = 0
        for c in range(start, 10):
            s2 = s*10 + c
            child_count2 = child_count
            i = 10
            while True:
                part = s2 % i
                if part % digits_count == 0:
                    child_count2 += 1
                    if child_count2 > 1:
                        break
                if part == s2:
                    break
                i *= 10

            if child_count2 <= 1:
                count += _one_child_number(s2, child_count2, digits_count)
        return count 

def one_child_number(int digits_count):
    return _one_child_number(0, 0, digits_count)

To find the number of F(10**7), it takes about 100ms to get the result 277674.

print sum(one_child_number(i) for i in xrange(8))

You need 64bit integer to calculate large results.

EDIT: I added some comment, but my English is not good, so I convert the code to pure python code, and add some print to help you figure out how it works.

The _one_child_number adds digit from left to s recursively, child_count is the child count in s, digits_count is the final digits of s.

def _one_child_number(s, child_count, digits_count):
    print s, child_count
    if s >= 10**(digits_count-1): # if the length of s is digits_count
        return child_count # child_count is 0 or 1 here, 1 means we found one one-child-number.
    else:
        if s == 0: 
            start = 1 #if the length of s is 0, we choose from 123456789 for the most left digit.
        else:
            start = 0 #otherwise we choose from 0123456789 
        count = 0 # init the one-child-number count
        for c in range(start, 10): # loop for every digit
            s2 = s*10 + c  # add digit c to the right of s

            # following code calculates the child count of s2
            child_count2 = child_count 
            i = 10
            while True:
                part = s2 % i
                if part % digits_count == 0:
                    child_count2 += 1
                    if child_count2 > 1: # when child count > 1, it's not a one-child-number, break
                        break
                if part == s2:
                    break
                i *= 10

            # if the child count by far is less than or equal 1, 
            # call _one_child_number recursively to add next digit.
            if child_count2 <= 1: 
                count += _one_child_number(s2, child_count2, digits_count)
        return count 

Here is he ouput of _one_child_number(0, 0, 3), and the count of one-child-number of 3 digits is the sum of the second column that the first column is a 3 digits number.

0 0
1 0
10 1
101 1
104 1
107 1
11 0
110 1
111 1
112 1
113 1
114 1
115 1
116 1
117 1
118 1
119 1
12 1
122 1
125 1
128 1
13 1
131 1
134 1
137 1
14 0
140 1
141 1
142 1
143 1
144 1
145 1
146 1
147 1
148 1
149 1
15 1
152 1
155 1
158 1
16 1
161 1
164 1
167 1
17 0
170 1
171 1
172 1
173 1
174 1
175 1
176 1
177 1
178 1
179 1
18 1
182 1
185 1
188 1
19 1
191 1
194 1
197 1
2 0
20 1
202 1
205 1
208 1
21 1
211 1
214 1
217 1
22 0
220 1
221 1
222 1
223 1
224 1
225 1
226 1
227 1
228 1
229 1
23 1
232 1
235 1
238 1
24 1
241 1
244 1
247 1
25 0
250 1
251 1
252 1
253 1
254 1
255 1
256 1
257 1
258 1
259 1
26 1
262 1
265 1
268 1
27 1
271 1
274 1
277 1
28 0
280 1
281 1
282 1
283 1
284 1
285 1
286 1
287 1
288 1
289 1
29 1
292 1
295 1
298 1
3 1
31 1
311 1
314 1
317 1
32 1
322 1
325 1
328 1
34 1
341 1
344 1
347 1
35 1
352 1
355 1
358 1
37 1
371 1
374 1
377 1
38 1
382 1
385 1
388 1
4 0
40 1
401 1
404 1
407 1
41 0
410 1
411 1
412 1
413 1
414 1
415 1
416 1
417 1
418 1
419 1
42 1
422 1
425 1
428 1
43 1
431 1
434 1
437 1
44 0
440 1
441 1
442 1
443 1
444 1
445 1
446 1
447 1
448 1
449 1
45 1
452 1
455 1
458 1
46 1
461 1
464 1
467 1
47 0
470 1
471 1
472 1
473 1
474 1
475 1
476 1
477 1
478 1
479 1
48 1
482 1
485 1
488 1
49 1
491 1
494 1
497 1
5 0
50 1
502 1
505 1
508 1
51 1
511 1
514 1
517 1
52 0
520 1
521 1
522 1
523 1
524 1
525 1
526 1
527 1
528 1
529 1
53 1
532 1
535 1
538 1
54 1
541 1
544 1
547 1
55 0
550 1
551 1
552 1
553 1
554 1
555 1
556 1
557 1
558 1
559 1
56 1
562 1
565 1
568 1
57 1
571 1
574 1
577 1
58 0
580 1
581 1
582 1
583 1
584 1
585 1
586 1
587 1
588 1
589 1
59 1
592 1
595 1
598 1
6 1
61 1
611 1
614 1
617 1
62 1
622 1
625 1
628 1
64 1
641 1
644 1
647 1
65 1
652 1
655 1
658 1
67 1
671 1
674 1
677 1
68 1
682 1
685 1
688 1
7 0
70 1
701 1
704 1
707 1
71 0
710 1
711 1
712 1
713 1
714 1
715 1
716 1
717 1
718 1
719 1
72 1
722 1
725 1
728 1
73 1
731 1
734 1
737 1
74 0
740 1
741 1
742 1
743 1
744 1
745 1
746 1
747 1
748 1
749 1
75 1
752 1
755 1
758 1
76 1
761 1
764 1
767 1
77 0
770 1
771 1
772 1
773 1
774 1
775 1
776 1
777 1
778 1
779 1
78 1
782 1
785 1
788 1
79 1
791 1
794 1
797 1
8 0
80 1
802 1
805 1
808 1
81 1
811 1
814 1
817 1
82 0
820 1
821 1
822 1
823 1
824 1
825 1
826 1
827 1
828 1
829 1
83 1
832 1
835 1
838 1
84 1
841 1
844 1
847 1
85 0
850 1
851 1
852 1
853 1
854 1
855 1
856 1
857 1
858 1
859 1
86 1
862 1
865 1
868 1
87 1
871 1
874 1
877 1
88 0
880 1
881 1
882 1
883 1
884 1
885 1
886 1
887 1
888 1
889 1
89 1
892 1
895 1
898 1
9 1
91 1
911 1
914 1
917 1
92 1
922 1
925 1
928 1
94 1
941 1
944 1
947 1
95 1
952 1
955 1
958 1
97 1
971 1
974 1
977 1
98 1
982 1
985 1
988 1
share|improve this answer
    
Well done! Thanks for your help. –  James Beezho Mar 13 '13 at 15:44
    
Because this program is recursive, print statements and nested print statements are not effective in communicating the magic behind your code. If it doesn't reveal some greater underlying structure behind one child numbers that would "Spoil" the problem for me, could you please explain the way it works. –  James Beezho Mar 14 '13 at 20:41

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