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Can anyone please explain like how to analyze jmeter's Summary Report?

Example:

Label : Login Action(sampler)
Sample# : 1
average: 104             // What does this mean actually?
min : 104                // What does this mean actually?
max : 104
stddev : 0               // What does this mean actually?
error% : 0
Throughput : 9.615384615 // What does this mean actually?
Kb/Sec : 91.74053486     // What does this mean actually?
Average Bytes : 9770     // What does this mean actually?
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It is pretty straightforward:

  • Average, min and max is the response times for the request in milliseconds. The response time os from the request is sent to the response is received. Since you have only one request they are of course all equal.

  • stddev is a measure of the variation of the response times: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_deviation.

  • Throughput is number of requests per second. With a average response time a little over 100ms the throughput is a little below 10.

  • Kb/Sec is the number of kilobytes transferred per second. It is Average Bytes (per request) * Throughput. I am not sure if the average bytes is for only the response or both the request and the response. My guess is that it is the latter. It is the latter: response headers and body.

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I have just found the very nice and simple explanation here: http://jmeterresults.blogspot.jp/2012/07/jmeterunderstanding-summary-report.html

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This is not the answer. Pleas add your suggestions in the comment. You can comment on the questions once you earn certain reputation – Sulthan Allaudeen Mar 25 '14 at 6:23

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