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I am trying to create a prolog program that accept input "i love you" as a string and then output

"i love you"
"i love yo"
"i love y"
"i love "
"i love"
"i lov"
"i lo"
"i l"
"i "
"i"

I am currently using SWI-Prolog, and the code I have is the following.

sublist(S, L) :-
  append(_, L2, L),
  append(S, _, L2).

contains(A, B) :-
  atom(A),
  name(A, AA),
  contains(AA, B).

contains(A, B) :-
  sublist(B, A),
  B \= [].

I use the following to execute the code :

?- forall(contains('i love you',X),writef("%s\n",[X])).

The following is the output generated exactly as shown.

i
i 
i l
i lo
i lov
i love
i love 
i love y
i love yo
i love you

 l
 lo
 lov
 love
 love 
 love y
 love yo
 love you
l
lo
lov
love
love 
love y
love yo
love you
o
ov
ove
ove 
ove y
ove yo
ove you
v
ve
ve 
ve y
ve yo
ve you
e
e 
e y
e yo
e you

 y
 yo
 you
y
yo
you
o
ou
u

I appreciate any and all help. Thanks a lot in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I dont fully understand your request (what do you mean with that accept input "i love you" as a string ?) but you don't really need a program to produce that output:

?- forall(append(_, [F|S], "I love you"), format('"~s"~n', [[F|S]])).
"I love you"
" love you"
"love you"
"ove you"
"ve you"
"e you"
" you"
"you"
"ou"
"u"
true.

the second argument of append/3 has been 'patterned' to be at least of length 1, to avoid the last empty string that would result otherwise.

edit the answer so far it's wrong: I didn't noticed that it shows the tail! Here is a debugged procedure, but not acting as a generator:

pheader([X]) :-
    format('~s~n', [[X]]), !.
pheader(L) :-
    format('~s~n', [L]),
    L = [_|Xs],
    pheader(Xs).

yields

?- pheader("i love you").
"i love you"
" love you"
"love you"
"ove you"
"ve you"
"e you"
" you"
"you"
"ou"
"u"
true.

then you need a 'program' to do it, at last!

edit to regain the initial behaviour (header generator), here a 2 argument procedure

pheader([X|Xs], [X|Xs]).
pheader([_|Xs], R) :-
    pheader(Xs, R).

yields, at last, the desidered output:

?- forall(pheader("i love you",X),format('"~s"~n', [X])).
"i love you"
" love you"
"love you"
"ove you"
"ve you"
"e you"
" you"
"you"
"ou"
"u"
true.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your answer. I remember clicking and marking this as the answer but somehow it was not done. Thanks a lot again CapelliC –  Kiong Jan 3 '14 at 3:37

To remove the last element of a list, you can use append(WithoutLast, [Last], List):

foo([]) :- !.
foo(S) :- format('"~s"~n', [S]), append(S1, [_Last], S), !, foo(S1).

?- foo("i love you").
"i love you"
"i love yo"
"i love y"
"i love "
"i love"
"i lov"
"i lo"
"i l"
"i "
"i"
true.

If you don't want it to be deterministic you can remove the cuts.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot to both for the questions. However, Boris is the closest. Boris, I do not really get where do I put that 2 statements and how does it integrate into my code. Sorry as I am very new to prolog (from OOP) –  Kiong Mar 17 '13 at 3:32
    
@user2164707 Those are not statements, the first two lines are a predicate definition and the third line is a query in the interactive interpreter. It could be useful if you did go through a Prolog tutorial of some sort, I haven't found a definitive "best" place to go but you will definitely find the answers of such easy questions. –  Boris Mar 17 '13 at 14:55
    
I did go through some prolog tutorials and then I got stuck with here. What I do not understand is what should I do with the 2 line of code? Should I do it like this? I am sorry but I am a bit blur _italic_**bold** sublist(S, L) :- append(_, L2, L), append(S, _, L2). %append(WithoutLast, [Last], List) contains(A, B) :- atom(A), name(A, AA), contains(AA, B). contains(A, B) :- sublist(B,A), B \= []. foo([]) :- !. foo(s) :- format('"~s"~n', [S]), append(S1, [_Last], S), !, foo(S1). –  Kiong Mar 17 '13 at 15:40
    
@user2164707 In the code example above, the first two lines (which define the predicate foo, which is a horrible name, a product of my lack of imagination) are the complete "program" that does what you originally stated you need. Put them in a file called something, then start the interactive Prolog interpreter and "consult" the file. You can then use the defined predicate as in the example starting on line 4. You should get output identical to what you see in the example. –  Boris Mar 17 '13 at 17:30

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