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I have a managed object that has a one-to-one relationship to itself. An example of this could be a person object could be linked to one other person to represent a marriage.

If one of the properties of the person was address and it was changed for one person, how would I follow the relationship and make sure it was changed for the linked person object.

Initially I thought about doing this in the setter, i.e setAddress but I quickly realised that this would cause infinite recursion between the two objects.

What's an elegant solution to this type of problem?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could still do that in the setter, but just check, if the destination value is already the one you want to set, return from setter, without any infinite loop.

You could try something like

- (void)setAddress:(NSString *)address
{
    // common setter here

    // then set your relationship's address
    if (![self.personRelationship.address isEqual:address]) {
        self.personRelationship.address = address;
    }
}
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Thanks for response, could you please provide a brief example? –  olly Mar 13 '13 at 10:39
    
You need to incorporate -willChangeValueForKey: and -didChangeValueForKey: in your setter, and the common setter should be setPrimitiveAddress:. See deepflame's answer. –  paulmelnikow Mar 13 '13 at 16:38
    
Works perfectly, thanks –  olly Mar 13 '13 at 21:59

Based on your description I would move the address into a separate entity Address that has a relationship to Person. Set up the relationship so that each person has one address and each address can be used by more than one person.

By doing this, you only need to change the address in one place, and then it immediately takes effect for any person who uses that address. If two people who have the same address later need to have different addresses, create a new Address entity for them.

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Much more elegant solution! –  Nikita Pestrov Mar 13 '13 at 19:52

1. Step

If you want to override the setter in CoreData you should follow the documentation here:

http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/CoreData/Articles/cdAccessorMethods.html#//apple_ref/doc/uid/TP40002154-SW14

The key in this is to use the "primitive" accessors like in the example:

- (void)setAddress:(NSString *)newAddress
{
    [self willChangeValueForKey:@"address"];
    [self setPrimitiveAddress:newAddress];
    [self didChangeValueForKey:@"address"];
}

Then you will not get an infinite loop trying to set the attribute.

2. Step

Apply it to the address question you can set the partner's address as well.

The code will change to

- (void)setAddress:(NSString *)newAddress
{
    [self willChangeValueForKey:@"address"];
    [self setPrimitiveAddress:newAddress];
    [self didChangeValueForKey:@"address"];

    [self.partner willChangeValueForKey:@"address"];
    [self.partner setPrimitiveAddress:newAddress];
    [self.partner didChangeValueForKey:@"address"];
}

Alternative suggested by noa:

- (void)setAddress:(NSString *)newAddress
{
    [self willChangeValueForKey:@"address"];
    [self setPrimitiveAddress:newAddress];
    if (![self.partner.address isEqual:newAddress])
        [self.partner setAddress:newAddress];
    [self didChangeValueForKey:@"address"];
}
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Good advice re the KVO methods, but I don't understand what the rest of your code has to do with OP's question about updating the address. Core Data relationships will automatically update their inverses, so I don't know if that code is necessary or will even work. Invoking willChangeValueForKey and setPrimitive... on something other than self also seems skeevy to me. –  paulmelnikow Mar 13 '13 at 16:34
    
good point. let me rephrase later and update the code. seems it was too late here when I answered the question. –  deepflame Mar 13 '13 at 17:27
    
this is updated now. Thanks again for the comment @noa –  deepflame Mar 14 '13 at 1:53
    
Sure. I posted an alternative code block which incorporates what I think is the best of both of your answers. Feel free to keep it or delete it as you see fit. –  paulmelnikow Mar 14 '13 at 2:17

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