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I have a ListView with a custom adapter that extends BaseAdapter and has 2 view types. When I run my adapter.removeRow(position) method, the data for the adapter is correctly updated, and the list reflects this, but the view types are not correctly updated. The Adapter is backed by

ArrayList<Map<String, String>> rows = new ArrayList<Map<String, String>>();

and I have a subset

List<Integer> flashSet = new ArrayList<Integer>();

which is a list of all the positions that are of ViewType 1 (as opposed to the standard view type 0).

Here is my adapter removeRow(position) method:

    public void removeRow(int position) {
        if (getItemViewType(position) == TYPE_FLASH) {
            flashSet.remove(position);
        }
        for (int flashPosition:flashSet) {
            System.out.println(tag+"is "+flashPosition+" going to be moved?");
             if (flashPosition > position) {
                 flashPosition -= 1;
                 System.out.println(tag+"Yes! It's been moved to "+flashPosition);
             }
        }
        rows.remove(position);
        notifyDataSetChanged();
    }

Here is my getView method:

@Override
    public View getView(int position, View convertView, ViewGroup parent) {
        FlashHolder flashHolder;
        ClipHolder clipHolder;
        int type = getItemViewType(position);
        if (convertView == null) {
            if (type == TYPE_CLIP) {
                convertView = rowInflater.inflate(R.layout.clip_note_row_layout, null);
                clipHolder = new ClipHolder();
                flashHolder = null;
                clipHolder.textView = (TextView)(convertView.findViewById(R.id.clip_text));
                convertView.setTag(clipHolder);
            } else {
                convertView = rowInflater.inflate(R.layout.flash_row_layout, null);
                clipHolder = null;
                flashHolder = new FlashHolder();
                flashHolder.front = (TextView)(convertView.findViewById(R.id.flash_text));
                flashHolder.back = (TextView)(convertView.findViewById(R.id.clip_text));
                convertView.setTag(flashHolder);
            }
        } else {
            if (type == TYPE_CLIP) {
                clipHolder = (ClipHolder)convertView.getTag();
                flashHolder = null;
            } else {
                clipHolder = null;
                flashHolder = (FlashHolder)convertView.getTag();
            }
        }
        if (type == TYPE_CLIP) {
            clipHolder.textView.setText(rows.get(position).get("clip"));
        } else {
            flashHolder.front.setText(rows.get(position).get("flash_text"));
            flashHolder.back.setText(rows.get(position).get("clip"));
        }
        return convertView;
    }

I know that I could create a new adapter, give it the updated ArrayList and call listView.setAdapter(adapter) but this seems total overkill when I'm simply trying to remove one item from a potentially long list. See pics for a before and after deleting: Before

Then I delete the first item. The word "which" was hidden behind the "Let's watch it" item and now the "inspired by…" item is hidden behind a blank item 3.

After

So, data is updating, view types aren't. Thanks for the help!

share|improve this question
    
+1 for the look and feel of the app and good explaination of the issue –  Nezam Mar 13 '13 at 10:48
    
Thank you. I'll let you know when it's released if you're interested. –  willlma Mar 13 '13 at 11:05
    
Have you overriden getViewTypeCount() and getItemViewType() methods in your adapter? –  M-WaJeEh Mar 13 '13 at 11:15
    
Yeah, I figured out the issue. See my answer below. Pure stupidity on my part and it took putting a question up here for me to figure out where I was going wrong. –  willlma Mar 13 '13 at 11:16
    
And I can see inconsistency in your { and } in getView() method. Please update your question if its not a coding fault. –  M-WaJeEh Mar 13 '13 at 11:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I figured it out. This will be useful to no one as I don't expect others to make the same mistake.

I naively thought that by doing this

    for (int flashPosition:flashSet) {
        System.out.println(tag+"is "+flashPosition+" going to be moved?");
         if (flashPosition > position) {
             flashPosition -= 1;
             System.out.println(tag+"Yes! It's been moved to "+flashPosition);
         }
    }

I was changing the actual value stored in the List<Integer> flashSet = new ArrayList<Integer>();

In fact, I need to do the following instead:

for (int flashPosition:flashSet) {
    System.out.println(tag+"is "+flashPosition+" going to be moved?");
     if (flashPosition > position) {
         flashSet.remove((Object)flashPosition);
         flashPosition -= 1;
         flashSet.add(flashPosition);
         System.out.println(tag+"Yes! It's been moved to "+flashPosition);
     }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Wouldn't it be easier to have ArrayList<MyListData>. MyListData being an abstract class and having an int type; variable. Now you will just need different concrete implementations. This way you can have as many View types as you want in your ListView, without having to manage complex and slow mechanisms for maintaining indices. E.g. in your getItemViewType() I guess you rely on List.contains() method whereas in above approach you can just call return rows.get(position).type. –  M-WaJeEh Mar 13 '13 at 11:34
    
Yeah, I'm using List.contains(). I see what you mean. It's a good idea. Do you think it would offer performance improvements or do you just think it's more elegant. I'll implement it if I need a third view type. Thanks. –  willlma Mar 13 '13 at 12:08
1  
contains() method takes O(n) time to find an item. getIteViewType() is called many times when user scrolls through ListView and every time contains() method iterates over your flasSet which consumes more resources, in my opinion. That's what I am saying. Its better to write flexible code first time instead of coming back and changing the whole code just because you want to add headers or fancy lines at some places in your ListView :) –  M-WaJeEh Mar 13 '13 at 12:45
1  
Also using this approach you can have totally different data types for each row of your ListView as well, not just Strings. One row could contain small Bitmap while other is a combination of boolean and Strings etc. –  M-WaJeEh Mar 13 '13 at 12:49
    
Point taken. Implementing now. Thanks. –  willlma Mar 13 '13 at 13:18

Try this, After delete or add item you need to call adapter refresh.

Youradapter.notifyDataSetChanged();
share|improve this answer
    
I have done this at the end of the removeRow() method. –  willlma Mar 13 '13 at 10:44

use yourlistview.invalidateViews()

instead of

notifyDataSetChanged();

it works for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, I get the same same result. –  willlma Mar 13 '13 at 10:43

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