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Is there a smarter way of protecting foreach loops against NullReference exceptions than this:

if (G_Locatie.OverdrachtFormulierList != null)
{
    foreach (OverdrachtFormulier otherform in G_Locatie.OverdrachtFormulierList)
    {
        ...
    }
}

I use a lot of foreach loops, often nested, and a lot of variables where e.g. G_Location certainly exists, but datamember .OverdrachtFormulierList may not have been assigned a list use new yet.


Dear friends, thanks for all your comments. After getting the idea of your suggestions, while having a lot of trouble understanding exactly, after digging through the Lasagna code I got to work on, and after some experimentation, I found that the easiest and cleanest way is to simply avoid having the NULL, by proper initialization. While I kind of resist having to initialize the OverdrachtFormulierList in my code, with the risk of forgetting one instance, I found the proper place for initialization, namely in the original class definition.

For simplicity, look at this code:

    class MyClass
    {
        public List<string> items = new List<string>();

        public IEnumerator<string> GetEnumerator()
        {
            return items.GetEnumerator();
        }
    }

    class MyComplexClass
    {
        private MyClass _itemlist /*= new MyClass()*/;
        public MyClass itemlist
        {
            get { return _itemlist; }
            set { _itemlist = value; }
        }
    }

    void Sandbox()
    {
        MyClass mc /*= new MyClass()*/;
        foreach (string Sb in mc.items)
        {
            string x = Sb;
        }

        MyComplexClass mcc = new MyComplexClass();
        foreach (string Mb in mcc.itemlist) // <--- NullReferenceException
        {
            string x = Mb;
        }

        return;
    }

The fun thing is that C# seems to protect you from a lot of buggy mistakes. This code will not build if you do not uncomment the initialization in Sandbox(), so the first foreach will not get a NullReferenceException.

However, you'd better uncomment the init in MyComplexClass to avoid the exception in the second foreach. C# will build with and without this initialization.

So it turns out that in my real code I just have to add a simple initialization in the Class definition of G_Locatie.

The only issue now is that I always wanted to simplify the above code with {get; set;} but that would not be possible with the initialization as described. I will have to live with that minor issue.

In fact, on object-type properties, you don't really need the setter.

Finally, I realized that I could not find a proper title for my problem. So far, every problem I had was already answered in this forum, and I feel that I had to post today only because I could not find posts similar to this one. Perhaps someone can come up with title and tags that make this solution better findable.

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2  
That's the reason why it's best practise to return an empty collection instead. –  Tim Schmelter Mar 13 '13 at 10:45
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2 Answers

Yes, your collection properties should return empty collections rather than null. One way you can ensure this is by using a backing field and assigning a new list in the getter:

private List<string> overdrachtFormulierList;

public List<string> OverdrachtFormulierList 
{
     get
     {
        return this.overdrachtFormulierList ?? 
            (this.overdrachtFormulierList = new List<string>());
     }

     set
     {
        this.overdrachtFormulierList = value;
     }
}

You can also use Enumerable.Empty<T> if your types are IEnumerable<T>

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Also: If you're using Code Contracts you can formalize this by adding an ensures to the getter: Contract.Ensures(Contract.Result<List<string>>() != null) - I have this sort of contract on all my collection getters. –  Matthew Watson Mar 13 '13 at 11:00
    
+1, the Enumerable.Empty suggestion is particularly nice. It would be even better to highlight that IEnumerable is often a more appropriate property type than the go-to-without-thinking List. –  Jon Mar 13 '13 at 13:03
    
Now that I added my fix to the question, I see that you already had the same solution, in a slightly different place. +1 –  Roland Mar 13 '13 at 14:50
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One option would be to create an extension method:

public static IEnumerable<T> EmptyIfNull<T>(this IEnumerable source)
{
    return source ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>();
}

Then:

foreach (var otherform in G_Locatie.OverdrachtFormulierList.EmptyIfNull())
{
    ...
}

It would still be preferable to always use an empty collection instead of a null reference, mind you.

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Seems a little wasteful but, works and directly answer's the question. If you can't ensure a number of IEnumerable<T>s are instantiated this makes sense. –  Jodrell Mar 13 '13 at 10:55
    
@Jodrell: Why is it wasteful? Enumerable.Empty() only creates a new object the first time it's called for a particular type argument. The only cost here is a method call... –  Jon Skeet Mar 13 '13 at 10:59
    
just the cost of the method call. Now I'm questioning if its more wasteful to always have an empty collection. –  Jodrell Mar 13 '13 at 11:18
    
@Jodrell: It sounds like you're micro-optimizing here. Optimize for readability - where EmptyIfNull is better than having to use an if statement, but worse than not having to do anything at all. I prefer it over devdigital's suggestion which lazily creates the collection though. –  Jon Skeet Mar 13 '13 at 11:20
    
I don't know, I think it moves the responsibility to the consumer which doesn't really solve the issue. Particularly as the extension method is likely to sit in another namespace so its existence isn't obvious and therefore is unlikely to be used by new consumers. –  devdigital Mar 13 '13 at 12:05
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