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Hi i have a SQL which is extremely slow.

select case when (value=1) 
then (select <Some Math Logic> from table where table.id=table_2.id) 
else 'false' end 
from table_2 where <where clause>

what i want to know is how does the case clause work..??

the part select <Some Math Logic> from table is working on huge table set.

in Java we see that for an if statement

if(condition_1==true) 
{return output;} 
else 
{return false;}

if the if statement is false then the part inside it is never processed, then what i want to know is if it is the same in the oracle SQL also.

does it work on the following logic..??

  • Check Case condition
  • if true, process inside output
  • else process other output.

or does it take the below logic:

  • pre-process all sub-queries
  • Check Case condition
  • if true, display inside output
  • else display other output.

please help

edit: Guys i dont want to tune the query shown above... this is just a dummy one.

what i need to know is how the case clause works step by step.

please share if any one has some input for that

share|improve this question
    
How your subquery correlates with main query? –  Hamlet Hakobyan Mar 13 '13 at 12:13
    
there are join clauses ill edit the query..,. –  Vineet Verma Mar 13 '13 at 12:15
    
To the best of my knowlege, the case logic works as per your example in java. What happens when you switch (value = 1) to something that will always return false? Is it still slow? Maybe the problem lies elsewhere. –  Dan Bracuk Mar 13 '13 at 12:20
    
Did you tried explain plan? I guess a third scenario takes place: the query is probably rewritten to a join between table and table_2 on their id columns. This is one select on both tables. For each resulting row either <some math logic> is evaluated or false is use - depending on value. If possible set indexes on both id columns. –  Claude Mar 13 '13 at 12:24
    
Where does value come from? Is is a parameter or a column on TABLE_2? –  APC Mar 13 '13 at 12:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems that the logic is exactly like that in java.

I used the following logic to test your scenario:

I created a dummy function as below which will just write something on the dbms_output and return only 10.

CREATE OR REPLACE
  FUNCTION DISP_MSG
    RETURN VARCHAR2
  AS
    ret_val VARCHAR2(20):='10';
  BEGIN
    dbms_output.enable;
    dbms_output.put_line('executed');
    RETURN ret_val;
  END DISP_MSG;

then i created an anonymous block to test the same:

DECLARE
  var VARCHAR2(100);
BEGIN
  SELECT CASE WHEN (1!=1) THEN DISP_MSG ELSE '1' END INTO var FROM dual;
  dbms_output.put_line('j = '||var);
END;

Output:

j = 1

but when i tried the below:

DECLARE
  var VARCHAR2(100);
BEGIN
  SELECT CASE WHEN (1=1) THEN DISP_MSG ELSE '1' END INTO var FROM dual;
  dbms_output.put_line('j = '||var);
END;

Output:

executed

j = 10

so its quite clear what is the execution logic

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this prooves anything- the DISP_MSG function is like a constant - it will do a "FAST DUAL", more than that, you compare a constant to a constant not a value from the table, try to see the execusion plan of this query: select case when dummy='Y' then (select count(*) from user_objects) else 0 end from dual. When I checked this I found that even though dummy is always 'X' it had the "TABLE ACCESS FULL" –  A.B.Cade Mar 13 '13 at 13:48
    
u are not getting the question...it is not about full scan or not...the user has clearly stated that he only wants to know what is the process of execution.. " edit: Guys i dont want to tune the query shown above... this is just a dummy one. what i need to know is how the case clause works step by step. please share if any one has some input for that" –  user1805212 Mar 14 '13 at 5:21
    
I do understand, I'm just saying that you haven't prooven anything, because if there is - in the execusion plan - a full table scan on the table which is in the select statement (which according to your answer is never evaluated) then something is incorrect in your answer... –  A.B.Cade Mar 14 '13 at 5:25

Does this solve your problem?

SELECT
   COALESCE(<Some Math Logic>, 'false')
FROM table_2 T2
    LEFT JOIN table T
        ON T.Id = T2.Id
           and T2.value = 1
WHERE <where clause>
share|improve this answer
    
i dont want the tuning of the query, i just want the execution plan of the clause... anyways, how does COALESCE work..?? and by who does it work means going 1 step at a time –  Vineet Verma Mar 13 '13 at 12:27

Good question. You need to see the execution plan to know for sure. The database engine is free to use any algorithm it sees fit so long as it gets you the results you asked for.

It could even outer join table to get the results in anticipation of value = 1. Or it could run the select from table and store the results into a temporary table that it can scan when it runs the main query.

Most likely, however, it is running the subquery for every row where value = 1. Hard to tell without seeing the plan.

It also depends on the details of . Are you taking aggregates? If so, a true join may be impossible and it may have to recalculate the answer for every row. If it's looking at values right on the table rows, then it may be able to optimize that away.

If you take the case statement out, does the overall query perform much faster? Want to make sure you are analyzing the correct sub-query.

share|improve this answer
    
I think in this case no need of plan. Correlated subquery with huge data in select clause. I think that says it all. –  Hamlet Hakobyan Mar 13 '13 at 12:26
    
No it doesn't say it all. Firstly, I have seen cases where two queries independently run quickly, but merging them into a single query with joins or sub-queries or what-not, they don't perform well. Secondly, the OP didn't ask for code. He asked which plan it would follow. So I suggested he ask Oracle for an execution plan. –  Brandon Mar 13 '13 at 12:34

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