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So, someone came to me with a project that failed linking with the error LNK2005: symbol already defined in object (using Visual Studio 2010). In this case, I know what is wrong (and hence could point them to the correct solution), but I don't know why this is wrong on a level to give a good explanation about it (to prevent it happening again).

// something.h
#ifndef _SOMETHING_H
#define _SOMETHING_H
int myCoolFunction();

int myAwesomeFunction() // Note implementing function in header
{
    return 3;
}
#endif

-

// something.cpp
#include "something.h"
int myCoolFunction()
{
    return 4;
}

-

// main.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include "something.h"

int main()
{
    std::cout << myAwesomeFunction() << std::endl;
}

This fails linking, and is fixed by putting myAwesomeFunction() into the .cpp and leaving a declaration in the .h.

My understanding of how the linker works comes pretty much from here. To my understanding, we are providing a symbol that is required in one place.

I looked up the MSDN article on LNK2005, which matches how I expect linkers to behave (provide a symbol more than once -> linker is confused), but doesn't seem to cover this case (which means I'm not understanding something obvious about linking).

Google and StackOverflow yield issues with people not including an #ifndef or #pragma once (which leads to multiple declarations of provided symbols)

A related question I found on this site has the same problem, but the answer doesn't explain why we're getting this problem adequately to my level of understanding.

I have a problem, I know the solution, but I don't know why my solution works

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps it would make more sense if you run all your .cpp files through the preprocessor then count how many global-namespace instances of myAwesomeFunction()there are. You know what the problem is, the solution for future avoidance of this "problem" is trivial "Doctor, it hurts when I do this.." "Then don't do that.". –  WhozCraig Mar 13 '13 at 12:21
    
I like to know why I do something, so that if someone says "Hey, why are you doing that?" I have a better response than "Oh, someone told me to". But yes, in day-to-day life, not abusing the linker is generally something I try and avoid. –  KidneyChris Mar 13 '13 at 12:32
    
You and me both. The compiler is open-game, but I try to respect the linker =P It is, after all, the closer in the ninth-inning. –  WhozCraig Mar 13 '13 at 12:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In a typical C++ project, you compile each of the implementation (or .cpp) files separately - you generally never pass a header (or .h) file to the compiler directly. After all preprocessing and inclusions are performed, each of these files becomes a translation unit. So in the example you've given, there are two translation units that look like this:

  • main.cpp translation unit:

    // Contents of <iostream> header here
    
    int myCoolFunction();
    
    int myAwesomeFunction() // Note implementing function in header
    {
        return 3;
    }
    
    int main()
    {
        std::cout << myAwesomeFunction() << std::endl;
    }
    
  • something.cpp translation unit:

    int myCoolFunction();
    
    int myAwesomeFunction() // Note implementing function in header
    {
        return 3;
    }
    
    int myCoolFunction()
    {
        return 4;
    }
    

Notice that both of these translation units contain duplicate content because they both included something.h. As you can see, only one of the above translation units contains a definition of myCoolFunction. That's good! However, they both contain a definition of myAwesomeFunction. That's bad!

After the translation units are compiled separately, they are then linked to form the final program. There are certain rules about multiple declarations across translation units. One of those rules is (§3.2/4):

Every program shall contain exactly one definition of every non-inline function or variable that is odr-used in that program; no diagnostic required.

You have more than one definition of myAwesomeFunction across your program and so you are breaking the rules. That's why your code doesn't link correctly.

You can think of it from the linker's perspective. After these two translation units are compiled, you have two object files. The linker's job is to connect the object files together to form the final executable. So it sees the call to myAwesomeFunction in main and tries to find a corresponding function definition in one of the object files. However, there are two definitions. The linker doesn't know which one to use so it just gives up.

Now let's see what the translation units look like if you define myAwesomeFunction in something.cpp:

  • Fixed main.cpp translation unit:

    // Contents of <iostream> header here
    
    int myCoolFunction();
    
    int myAwesomeFunction();
    
    int main()
    {
        std::cout << myAwesomeFunction() << std::endl;
    }
    
  • Fixed something.cpp translation unit:

    int myCoolFunction();
    
    int myAwesomeFunction();
    
    int myCoolFunction()
    {
        return 4;
    }
    
    int myAwesomeFunction()
    {
        return 3;
    }
    

Now it's perfect. There is only one definition of myAwesomeFunction across the whole program now. When the linker sees the call to myAwesomeFunction in main, it knows exactly which function definition it should link it to.

share|improve this answer
    
So, continuing my trend of dumb questions: what are the include guards doing if my whole header file is dumped in each translation unit? How do they work? –  KidneyChris Mar 13 '13 at 12:30
2  
@KidneyChris The include guards prevent the header from being included in the same translation unit twice. Headers are supposed to be included across multiple translation units. –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 13 '13 at 12:31
    
@stfrabbit Heh. I asked a question on "I don't want to do this without knowing why it works", and as part of it I took for granted that I slap #ifndef at the top of every header. My mental model is coming together now. Would I be correct in assuming that, for this example, the include guards are completely unnecessary because nothing is including a file that included something.h? –  KidneyChris Mar 13 '13 at 12:37
2  
@KidneyChris Yes, that's true. But it's always a good idea to prevent problems in the future. I think understanding the compilation process of C++ is a big part of understanding why we do the things we do. Some things becoming blindingly obvious when you think about them in terms of translation units and linking. –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 13 '13 at 12:39
    
@stfrabbit While you're editing and explaining basic concepts to me, I don't think iostream ends up in something.cpp's translation unit –  KidneyChris Mar 13 '13 at 12:43

The linker is merely letting you know that you broke the one definition rule. This is a basic, well-documented rule of C++ - it isn't solved by using include guards or #pragma once directives, but, in case of a free function, by marking it inline or moving the implementation to a source file.

When a non-inline method is implemented in a header, all translation units that include that header will define it. When the corresponding .obj files are linked together, the linker detects the same symbol is exported (and defined) multiple times, and complains.

Moving the implementation to a cpp file effectively transforms your initial definition into a declaration.

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myAwesomeFunction is defined in two source files: something.cpp and main.cpp. Move its implementation to one of source files, or declare this function as static.

share|improve this answer
    
He knows that part. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 13 '13 at 13:30

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