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I am writing a very simple utility class with the aim to measure the time executed for any method passed in (of any type).

In my case Membership.ValidateUser(model.UserName, model.Password) return bool so I get an exception.

I would like if would be possible write a utililty class of this type an a sample of code on how to fix it. Does it make sense use dynamic in stead of action?

Tracing.Log(Membership.ValidateUser(model.UserName, model.Password), "Membership.ValidateUser");

public static class Tracing
        {
            public static void Log(Action action, string message)
            {
                // Default details for the Log
                string sSource = "TRACE";
                string sLog = "Application";

                // Create the Log
                if (!EventLog.SourceExists(sSource))
                    EventLog.CreateEventSource(sSource, sLog);

                // Measure time Elapsed for an Action
                Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
                action();
                stopwatch.Stop();
                TimeSpan timeElapsed = stopwatch.Elapsed;

                // Write the Log
                EventLog.WriteEntry(sSource, "TIME-ELAPSED: " + timeElapsed .ToString() + message, EventLogEntryType.Warning, 234);
            }
        }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Your current code tries to execute ValidateUser and use the result as the method argument. You want to pass in an action without first executing ValidateUser.

You just need to convert your method call to use a lambda expression to create a delegate:

Tracing.Log(() => Membership.ValidateUser(model.UserName, model.Password), 
            "Membership.ValidateUser");

(Dynamic typing wouldn't affect this at all.)

Note that timing a single method execution is often going to give you very noisy results, unless it's a reasonably long method call. Usually to benchmark a single method you'd want to execute the method many times, until you've spent a reasonably significant amount of time executing it. Using Stopwatch helps, but it doesn't get past the fact that your method may require very few ticks to complete, and if the thread is pre-empted, that will have a disproportionate effect on the results.

EDIT: I'm assuming that you want to use this purely for benchmarking. If you're trying to do this tracing in your real application, you'll want a less invasive approach. Look at Mini-MVC-Profiler for example.

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I would like to thank your for your explanation. How could be rewrite my class and make the use of labda within in? thanks for your time –  GibboK Mar 13 '13 at 12:38
    
@GibboK: I don't know what you mean. I've shown you how you can call the method. –  Jon Skeet Mar 13 '13 at 12:41
    
Thanks Jon, I was not aware of MVC-Profiler. –  GibboK Mar 13 '13 at 12:44

No offense intended, but your design approach seems backward to me. I assume your business goals are more about validating a user than timing code operations. If that's incorrect, ignore me. :)

If I were you, I would inject a timing/tracing class into your validation instead of the other way around. You could use dependency injection in any number of ways (one of the frameworks or simple constructor injection), and use it to do timing if it was provided.

HTH

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1  
While it's fine to want to trace with live traffic, it's also useful to be able to exercise a method purely for the sake of benchmarking it. –  Jon Skeet Mar 13 '13 at 12:37
    
Yes I just need a quick way to trace live traffic –  GibboK Mar 13 '13 at 12:42
    
No argument, but I don't understand why one would offload the responsibility of executing an Action or Func (what happened to the OP's desire to get the bool back?) to a helper class. What if, say, you then wanted to use another helper class designed the same way to provide profiling metrics? ValidateUser already ran in the earlier call.. IDK.. –  Todd Sprang Mar 13 '13 at 12:47
    
Huh, OK. I'm clearly missing something. :) –  Todd Sprang Mar 13 '13 at 12:49

If you can modify the method that is measured, you can introduce a class that will start timer at it's creation, and stop it on disposal. And, if some threshold is exceeded, it will create a log message

Usage will be :

using(var tm = new TimeMeasurementThreshold(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1),"Sending mail block",logger)){
 // measured code here 
}

public class TimeMeasurementThreshold : IDisposable
    {
        private readonly Logger logger;

        private readonly TimeSpan thresholdTime;

        private readonly string codeBlockName;

        private readonly TimeMeasurement timeMeasurement;

        public TimeMeasurementThreshold(TimeSpan thresholdTime, string codeBlockName, Logger logger)
        {
            this.logger = logger;
            this.thresholdTime = thresholdTime;
            this.codeBlockName = codeBlockName;

            timeMeasurement = new TimeMeasurement();
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            TimeSpan elapsed = timeMeasurement.Elapsed;

            if (elapsed >= thresholdTime)
            {
                logger.Debug("{0} execution time is {1:N0}ms", codeBlockName, elapsed.TotalMilliseconds);
            }
        }
    }
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You can easily use a lambda to assign the result of an action that you pass to another method, for example:

using System;

namespace Demo
{
    public static class Program
    {
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            bool result = false;

            Tracing.Log(() =>
            {
                result = test("");  // Assign to result.
            }, "Message");

            Console.WriteLine(result);
        }

        private static bool test(string value)
        {
            return string.IsNullOrEmpty(value);
        }
    }

    public static class Tracing
    {
        public static void Log(Action action, string message)
        {
            action();
            Console.WriteLine(message);
        }
    }
}
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