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I have this piece of html

<button ui:confirm ng:click="action"></button>

and a bit of JavaScript

.directive('uiConfirm', function()
{
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs)
        {
            element.bind('click.confirm', function(event)
            {
                event.preventDefault();
                event.stopPropagation();
            });
        }
    }
})

Now, what I'm trying to do, is to cancel the ng:click event, from within the directive. But the ng:click still get's triggered, no matter what I do.

Demo: Fiddle

Edit: By the way, causing an error within the this scope:

element.bind('click.confirm', function(event)
{
    causeAnError();
    event.preventDefault();
    event.stopPropagation();
});

Does the trick, and canceles the event propagation, but also throws and ugly error =)

Edit 2: Finally I've found a solution!

.directive('uiConfirm', function()
{
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs)
        {
            element.bind('click', function(event)
            {
                scope.$eval(attrs.uiConfirm); // this line of code does the magic!
            });
        }
    }
})

Edit 3:

FINAL SOLUTION

.directive('uiConfirm', function()
{
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs)
        {
            /**
             * Clicking the trigger start the confirmation process.
             */
            element.bind('click.confirm', function(event)
            {
                // not confirmed?
                if( ! element.data().confirmed)
                {
                    element.data().confirmed = true;
                    element.addClass('btn-danger');
                }
                // is already confirmed..
                else
                {
                    element.trigger('mouseout.confirm');
                    scope.$eval(attrs.uiConfirm);
                }
            });

            /**
             * Leaving the element, resets the whole process.
             */
            element.bind('mouseout.confirm', function()
            {
                // reset all values
                element.data().confirmed = false;
                element.removeClass('btn-danger');
            });

            // reset the whole process on the first run
            element.trigger('mouseout.confirm');
        }
    }
})

Clicking a button the first time, gonna make it red, and doesn't trigger any action. Clicking a second time, calls the action. Leaving the button resets the whole process.

share|improve this question
1  
@Arun P Johny - thank you for the Fiddle!! – M K Mar 13 '13 at 13:19
    
what you are trying to do may be related to this groups.google.com/forum/#!msg/angular/ADylKzNT5oI/n6ZagosZZgsJ – Arun P Johny Mar 13 '13 at 13:24
    
@ArunPJohny I've already seen this, but it's another scenario. – M K Mar 13 '13 at 13:27
    
What does bind('click.confirm') do? I haven't seen that before. – Mark Rajcok Mar 13 '13 at 16:34
1  
click = event, confirm = namespace – M K Mar 13 '13 at 18:09
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As discussed in the comments on @Flek's answer, to call a function defined in an attribute,

ui:confirm="action()"

use scope.$eval():

element.bind('click', function(event) {
    scope.$eval(attrs.uiConfirm);  // calls action() on the scope
});
share|improve this answer
1  
As of Angular 1.2.0-rc.3 and probably earlier, you should use scope.$apply() instead so that any actions that effect the scope will show up... – JustMaier Nov 8 '13 at 21:40
    
im using angular 1.3.15 and it doesnt stop ng-click from executing. – boi_echos Jul 14 '15 at 17:38

You have two nested directives:

  1. uiConfirm
  2. ngClick

You then bind two event handlers to it (one by uiConfirm and the other one by ngClick). With preventDefault you want to stop the default action but I guess the default action of a button is not calling the action() method. stopPropagation just prevents the event from bubbling up the DOM tree but since you only care about the button itself it doesn't change anything.

What I would do is to create a custom action method within the directive and then check whether it should do something or not.

.directive('uiConfirm', function()
{
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function(scope, element, attrs)
        {
            scope.action = function(){
                // Check whether there is something to do or not.
            };
        }
    }
})
share|improve this answer
    
Let's assume, instead of the ng:click, I create ui:confirm that will be a mix of ng:click and previous ui:confirm. But how can I evaluate the function that I've passed into the directive, from within the directive? ui:confirm="action()" -> in the directive it's a simple string, not a function. – M K Mar 13 '13 at 18:11
1  
@maximkott, scope.$eval(attrs.uiConfirm). – Mark Rajcok Mar 13 '13 at 19:18
    
@MarkRajcok gonna try this, post you the result later) – M K Mar 14 '13 at 20:53
    
@MarkRajcok Dude, this did the trick! post a real answer so I can give you an "accept", Cheers!)) – M K Mar 14 '13 at 21:02
    
This solution feels much better than the accepted answer. – itsafire Feb 19 '14 at 10:45

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