Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to come up with a method that takes an integer and returns a boolean to say if the number is prime or not and I don't know much C, anyone care to give me some pointers?

basically how i would do this in C# is like so:

static bool IsPrime(int number)
{
    for (int i = 2; i < number; i++)
    {
      if (number % i == 0 && i != number)
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this question
1  
This is more of a math question than a programming question, surely? –  bdonlan Oct 8 '09 at 15:46
25  
Here's some pointers: int *ptr; int *ptr2; int *ptr3. Sorry couldn't help it. How big are the numbers you will be checking? And also, do you want a heuristic or something that always works? –  AlbertoPL Oct 8 '09 at 15:47
3  
Come up with you algorithm (the way you test it without code) and then maybe we can help express it in C. –  BobbyShaftoe Oct 8 '09 at 15:49
7  
What's the point of 'i != number' when you have 'i < number' as a condition to execute the loop? –  Matthieu M. Oct 8 '09 at 17:36
1  
Also note that checking i < number is overkill. By definition, if a number x = a * b, either a or b is < int(sqrt(x)) and the other is greater. So your loop should only need to go up to int(sqrt(x)). –  twalberg May 17 '13 at 14:28
show 2 more comments

11 Answers

up vote 98 down vote accepted

OK, so forget about C. Suppose I give you a number and ask you to determine if it's prime. How do you do it? Write down the steps clearly, then worry about translating them into code.

Once you have the algorithm determined, it will be much easier for you to figure out how to write a program, and for others to help you with it.

edit: Here's the C# code you posted:

static bool IsPrime(int number) {
    for (int i = 2; i < number; i++) {
        if (number % i == 0 && i != number) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

This is very nearly valid C as is; there's no bool type in C, and no true or false, so you need to modify it a little bit (edit: Kristopher Johnson correctly points out that C99 added the stdbool.h header). Also, prior to C99, you couldn't declare a variable in a for statement, and a lot of compilers still don't support it by default, so let's change that too:

int IsPrime(int number) {
    int i;
    for (i=2; i<number; i++) {
        if (number % i == 0 && i != number) return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

This is a perfectly valid C program that does what you want. We can improve it a little bit without too much effort. First, note that i is always less than number, so the check that i != number always succeeds; we can get rid of it.

Also, you don't actually need to try divisors all the way up to number - 1; you can stop checking when you reach sqrt(number). Since sqrt is a floating-point operation and that brings a whole pile of subtleties, we won't actually compute sqrt(number). Instead, we can just check that i*i <= number:

int IsPrime(int number) {
    int i;
    for (i=2; i*i<=number; i++) {
        if (number % i == 0) return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

One last thing, though; there was a small bug in your original algorithm! If number is negative, or zero, or one, this function will claim that the number is prime. You likely want to handle that properly, and you may want to make number be unsigned, since you're more likely to care about positive values only:

int IsPrime(unsigned int number) {
    if (number <= 1) return 0; // zero and one are not prime
    unsigned int i;
    for (i=2; i*i<=number; i++) {
        if (number % i == 0) return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}

This definitely isn't the fastest way to check if a number is prime, but it works, and it's pretty straightforward. We barely had to modify your code at all!

share|improve this answer
3  
FYI, the C99 standard defines a <stdbool.h> header that provides bool, true, and false. –  Kristopher Johnson Oct 8 '09 at 16:38
13  
I know that it is simpler to compute a square than a square root, however computing a square on each iteration ought to cost MORE that computing the square root once and be done with it :x –  Matthieu M. Oct 8 '09 at 17:39
4  
On a modern out-of-order machine, the latency of the mul instruction to square i should be entirely hidden in the latency of the modulus, so there would be no appreciable performance win. On a strictly in-order machine, there is a win to be had using a hoisted square root, but that potentially raises issues of floating-point imprecision if the code were compiled on a platform with a large int type (64 bits or bigger). All that can be dealt with, but I thought it best to keep things simple and trivially portable. After all, if you care about speed, you're not using this algorithm at all. –  Stephen Canon Oct 8 '09 at 17:51
4  
@Tom you can improve a lot more by stopping at the floor(sqrt(number)). Take 11, for example, floor(sqrt(11)) = 3. The number after 3 is 4, 3*4 = 12 > 11. If you're using a naive sieve to check for primality, you only need to check odd numbers up to the sqrt of the original, aside from 2. –  Calyth Oct 8 '09 at 23:08
1  
@Matthieu M.: Agreed. I wrote a ruby script to test this: 331: Stephen: 0.000635 Matthieu: 0.000611 68720001023: Stephen: 1.958449 Matthieu: 0.003167 999999000001: Stephen: 7.293912 Matthieu: 0.005871 –  DJTripleThreat May 30 '10 at 4:39
show 8 more comments

I'm suprised that no one mentioned this.

Use the Sieve Of Eratosthenes

Details:

  1. Basically nonprime numbers are divisible by another number besides 1 and themselves
  2. Therefore: a nonprime number will be a product of prime numbers.

The sieve of Eratosthenes finds a prime number and stores it. When a new number is checked for primeness all of the previous primes are checked against the know prime list.

Reasons:

  1. This algorithm/problem is known as "Embarrassingly Parallel"
  2. It creates a collection of prime numbers
  3. Its an example of a dynamic programming problem
  4. Its quick!
share|improve this answer
3  
It's also O(n) in space, and as long as your computation is for a single value, this is a huge waste of space for no performance gain. –  R.. May 29 '11 at 21:15
1  
(Actually O(n log n) or larger if you're supporting large numbers...) –  R.. May 29 '11 at 21:16
    
Who computes only 1 value for a prime for the life span of the application? Primes are a good candidate to be cached. –  monksy May 30 '11 at 20:14
    
A command line program that terminates after one query would be an obvious example. In any case, keeping global state is ugly and should always be considered a trade-off. And I would go so far as to say the sieve (generated at runtime) is essentially useless. If your prime candidates are small enough that you can fit a sieve that size in memory, you should just have a static const bitmap of which numbers are prime and use that, rather than filling it at runtime. –  R.. May 31 '11 at 0:01
    
Or, as a general rule, memoization is almost always useless unless you can somehow omit large spans, since whenever you can afford that much memory, you could even more easily afford that much disk space/.text segment size. –  R.. May 31 '11 at 0:03
add comment
  1. Build a table of small primes, and check if they divide your input number.
  2. If the number survived to 1, try pseudo primality tests with increasing basis. See Miller-Rabin primality test for example.
  3. If your number survived to 2, you can conclude it is prime if it is below some well known bounds. Otherwise your answer will only be "probably prime". You will find some values for these bounds in the wiki page.
share|improve this answer
2  
+1: complete overkill for what the questioner was asking, but correct nonetheless. –  Stephen Canon Oct 8 '09 at 21:54
add comment

Check the modulus of each integer from 2 up to the root of the number you're checking.

If modulus equals zero then it's not prime.

pseudo code:

bool IsPrime(int target)
{
  for (i = 2; i <= root(target); i++)
  {
    if ((target mod i) == 0)
    {
      return false;
    }
  }

  return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Of course, the downside is that the the sqrt is calculated on every iteration, which will slow it down a lot. –  Rich Bradshaw Oct 8 '09 at 16:23
5  
Any reasonable compiler should be able to detect that root(target) is a loop invariant and hoist it. –  Stephen Canon Oct 8 '09 at 16:29
1  
(and if you have a compiler that can't do that optimization, you should absolutely file a bug to let the compiler writer know that they're missing this optimization.) –  Stephen Canon Oct 8 '09 at 16:30
    
along with many other potential (micro)optimistations, If you manually get the sqrt before the for statement you can check the mod of that as well (and return false if 0). –  Matt Lacey Oct 9 '09 at 7:49
1  
What if the target value is 1? –  f01 Dec 5 '12 at 20:10
add comment

I would just add that no even number (bar 2) can be a prime number. This results in another condition prior to for loop. So the end code should look like this:

int IsPrime(unsigned int number) {
    if (number <= 1) return 0; // zero and one are not prime
    if ((number > 2) && ((number % 2) == 0)) return 0; //no even number is prime number (bar 2)
    unsigned int i;
    for (i=2; i*i<=number; i++) {
        if (number % i == 0) return 0;
    }
    return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

add this before your C# code and you're ready to go

typedef enum{false,true} bool;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Try something like this:

int is_prime(int val)
{
  int div;
  for (div = 2; div < val; div++){
    if (val % div == 0)
      return 0;
  }
  return 1;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This is very inefficient algorithm, one minor thing that can be done is to atleast do Ceiling(val/2) since you never need to check past the first half of numbers. However I do believe there actually is a much better way to solve is a number prime than brute force guess and check –  Chris Marisic Oct 8 '09 at 15:54
    
Sure there are solutions that don't reduce to trial division. See, for instance, the Miller-Rabin test linked to by Eric Bainville. –  jk. Oct 8 '09 at 18:27
add comment
int is_prime(int val)
{
   int div,square;

   if (val==2) return TRUE;    /* 2 is prime */
   if ((val&1)==0) return FALSE;    /* any other even number is not */

   div=3;
   square=9;    /* 3*3 */
   while (square<val)
   {
     if (val % div == 0) return FALSE;    /* evenly divisible */
     div+=2;
     square=div*div;
   }
   if (square==val) return FALSE;
   return TRUE;
}

Handling of 2 and even numbers are kept out of the main loop which only handles odd numbers divided by odd numbers. This is because an odd number modulo an even number will always give a non-zero answer which makes those tests redundant. Or, to put it another way, an odd number may be evenly divisible by another odd number but never by an even number (E*E=>E, E*O=>E, O*E=>E and O*O=>O).

A division/modulus is really costly on the x86 architecture although how costly varies (see http://gmplib.org/~tege/x86-timing.pdf). Multiplications on the other hand are quite cheap.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want to test the prime status efficiently, use the Miller-Rabin test. Here is a C code.

share|improve this answer
add comment
bool IsPrime(int number)
{
    for (int i = 2; i < number; i++)
    {
      if (number % i == 0 && i != number)
      return false;
    }
    return true;
}

Is the correct code. I've tested the code.

share|improve this answer
add comment
int is_prime(int a){

    int r = 1; //return 1 or 0
    int i = 3;
    if(a == 1 ){
        //1 is neither prime nor composite
        return 0;
    }
    if(a == 2){
        return r;
    }

    if(a%2 == 0){
        return 0; //even no.
    } 

    while (i <= (a/2)){
        if (a%i == 0){
            return 0;
        }
        i += 2;
    }
    return r;
}

1 would simply be returned false and 2 returns true. Any even no. returns false.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.