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I have this Enum code:

enum Duration { Day, Week, Month };

Can I add a extension methods for this Enum?

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1  
Why do you want to do this? – LukeHennerley Mar 13 '13 at 14:27
1  
Have you seen this?stackoverflow.com/questions/2422113/… – badpanda Mar 13 '13 at 14:27
1  
Also, this. stackoverflow.com/questions/276585/… – badpanda Mar 13 '13 at 14:30
    
short answer, yes. In this specific case you might want to consider the use of TimeSpan – Jodrell Mar 13 '13 at 14:31
1  
Using extension methods on an enum would make me feel dirty. Create a class to encapsulate what is needed. Keep an enum as simple as possible. If you need more logic associated with it, then create a Duration class that exposes day, week, month plus contains any other logic that would have been in the extension method. – Jason Evans Mar 13 '13 at 14:31
up vote 32 down vote accepted

According to this site:

Extension methods provide a way to write methods for existing classes in a way other people on your team might actually discover and use. Given that enums are classes like any other it shouldn’t be too surprising that you can extend them, like:

enum Duration { Day, Week, Month };

static class DurationExtensions {
  public static DateTime From(this Duration duration, DateTime dateTime) {
    switch duration {
      case Day:   return dateTime.AddDays(1);
      case Week:  return dateTime.AddDays(7);
      case Month: return dateTime.AddMonths(1);
      default:    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("duration")
    }
  }
}

I think enums are not the best choice in general but at least this lets you centralize some of the switch/if handling and abstract them away a bit until you can do something better. Remember to check the values are in range too.

You can read more here at Microsft MSDN.

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40  
"enums are evil"? What's next in line? Kittens? – Jon Mar 13 '13 at 14:30
1  
I have to agree with @Jon, what in the world? What do you mean enums are evil? – Michael Perrenoud Mar 13 '13 at 14:34
    
It is an evocative and off topic way of saying yes. – Jodrell Mar 13 '13 at 14:35
    
I believe the "enums are evil" comment is out of place but has a basis in reality. I do find that enums can be a problem is overused, as they sort of lock you in to certain contexts and behaviors. – Ed Schwehm Mar 13 '13 at 14:37
1  
@Ed Schwehm I changed the evil as you suggest – One Man Crew Mar 13 '13 at 14:40

You can create an extension for anything, even object(although that's not considered best-practice). Understand an extension method just as a public static method. You can use whatever parameter-type you like on methods.

public static class DurationExtensions
{
  public static int CalculateDistanceBetween(this Duration first, Duration last)
  {
    //Do something here
  }
}
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See MSDN.

public static class Extensions
{
  public static void SomeMethod(this Duration enumValue)
  {
    //Do something here
  }
}
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5  
A void return value on an enum is kind of weird. I'd think about a more realistic sample. – psubsee2003 Mar 13 '13 at 14:41
2  
@psubsee2003 the OP surely has enough knowledge to change this to suit his needs? Why does the sample matter, it's enough to answer the initial question. – LukeHennerley Mar 13 '13 at 14:46

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