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I know this is a duplicate topic, but this topic is different because i use very simple examples. I have a JavaScript function like this:

(function myfunction($){
    function a(){
        alert("A section"); 
    }
    function b(){
        alert("B section")
    }
})();

I want to create a HTML button which calls function A, and function B. How can i do that?

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3  
You cannot access those functions from outside the closure. –  Mathletics Mar 13 '13 at 15:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Make them global by declaring the names outside the closure, then assign them within the closure.

var a, b;
(function myfunction($){
    a = function() {
        alert("A section"); 
    }
    b = function() {
        alert("B section")
    }
})();

You can reduce the pollution of the global namespace by wrapping them in an object:

var myfuns = (function myfunction($) {
                 return { a: function() {alert("A section");},
                          b: function() {alert("B section");}
                        };
              })();

Then call myfuns.a and myfuns.b.

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If it's the best, why haven't you accepted it? –  Barmar Mar 13 '13 at 16:00
    
Done, its ok now! –  user962775 Mar 13 '13 at 16:18
    
It would be nice to other posters if you accepted answers in your old questions, too. –  Barmar Mar 13 '13 at 16:18
    
I'll do it. btw, I new to this site. –  user962775 Mar 13 '13 at 16:53
    
Huh? You've been here for a year and a half! –  Barmar Mar 13 '13 at 16:55

You can create an object that has these function and call your functions like below :

myFunctions = {

  a : function(){ alert("A section"); },
  b : function(){ alert("B section"); }

}

and then call them like below :

myFunctions.a();
myFunctions.b();

This is the jsfiddle to check it.

UPDATE:

As answer to your comment, this is an updated jsfiddle to show you how it works from HTML.

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This method can't call myFunctions.a(); and myFunctions.b(); through a HTML button. –  user962775 Mar 13 '13 at 15:28
1  
Yes you can, if you are including your javascript in the header. –  Mehdi Karamosly Mar 13 '13 at 15:32
    
@Julek I updated my post to include an example with HTML. –  Mehdi Karamosly Mar 13 '13 at 17:40

Assign function to global variables in closure is one way. Other way to do it is following.

(function myfunction($){
    $("#button1").click(function {
        alert("A section"); 
    });
    $("#button2").click(function {
        alert("B section"); 
    });
})(jQuery);

This doesn't spoil your global scope. And binds on click event for your buttons.

When not using jQuery

(function myfunction($){
    var button1 = getElementById("idOfButton1");
    button1.onclick = function {
        alert("A section"); 
    };
    var button2 = getElementById("idOfButton2");
    button1.onclick = function {
        alert("B section"); 
    };
})();
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When did he say he's using jQuery? –  Barmar Mar 13 '13 at 15:16

You can create a variable first, and then expose it to global context:

(function myfunction($){
    var global = {
        a: function(){
            alert("A section");
        },
        b: function(){
            alert("B section")
        }
    };

    window.global = global;
})();
global.a();
global.b();
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1  
This is how jquery works? No it isn't. –  Mathletics Mar 13 '13 at 15:23
    
@Mathletics Would you mind telling me if I mislead something? –  Xiaodan Mao Mar 14 '13 at 10:59
    
Well you didn't use any jQuery, so I don't know what that statement is supposed to mean. –  Mathletics Mar 14 '13 at 14:01
    
@Mathletics Thanks for telling me. I don't mean I use jQuery code here. In jQuery, we can find such code: "window.jQuery = window.$ = jQuery;", so I use the similar syntax in the answer. I've deleted the ambiguous words. –  Xiaodan Mao Mar 15 '13 at 10:34

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