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C/C++ allows the return of pointers:

int* returnpointer() {
    int c = 1;
    int *d = &c;
    return d;
}

so that it may be used in the caller function:

int* p = returnpointer();

This is the style I am most accustomed to as it makes the most natural sense.

Why then, would C/C++ provide a language feature to return an address if the above suffices in normal conditions? i.e.:

int& returnpointer() {
    int c = 1;
    int *d = &c;
    return *d;
}

called through the caller:

int* p = &returnpointer();

Given that I am more versed in the former, are there any features of the latter that the former isn't as well suited to do?

PS: I am aware that such code is dangerous because it can involve pointers pointing to variables that no longer exist as functions exit the stack. However that is not the scope of this question.

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1  
Returning a reference guarantees you'll get something - i.e. there's no way to pass NULL, as you could with a pointer. Also, a pointer could be cast to a different type - a reference cannot. –  Roger Rowland Mar 13 '13 at 15:22
1  
The first returnpointer() has a lovely side effect of undefined behavior, so its a pretty bad example; the second is just plain wrong. –  WhozCraig Mar 13 '13 at 15:23
    
@WhozCraig They both have undefined behviour! –  Alex Chamberlain Mar 13 '13 at 15:39
2  
@AlexChamberlain .. and an unnecessary d along for the ride. –  WhozCraig Mar 13 '13 at 15:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

int& is not address-of operator. int a = 0; int *ptr = &a; that is the address-of operator.

int& returnpointer() {
    int c = 1;
    int *d = &c;
    return *d;
}

This does not return an address, but a reference to an int. Think of a reference as an alias to another variable.

int a = 15; int& ref = a;

ref is now just another name for a.

The difference between references and pointers is that a reference can never be NULL, it always must refer to something.

A little note:

int* returnpointer() {
    int c = 1;
    int *d = &c;
    return d;
}

You are returning a pointer to a local function variable c here, which is undefined behaviour, because that variable is destroyed when the function exits. In order to return a pointer you need to create it on the heap like so int * f = new int; *f = 5; return f;. Now you can return f and use it outside the function.

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You are confusing returning an address with returning a reference:

int& returnpointer() { ... }

Here, returnpointer() returns a reference to an int. A reference is an alias for an object of a certain type. References have different semantics to pointers, so they tend to serve different purposes.

A couple of differences that are very important are that references cannot be default constructed (there is nothing to construct), and they cannot be reset. They need to be initialized to refer to an existing object and they refer to that same object during their lifetime.

Pointers on the other hand hold values (representing addresses), and these values can be changed during their lifetime. A pointer can be made to point to a different object, be a nullptr, or point somewhere completely random (potentially leading to undefined behaviour if de-referenced).

Note that both your examples are wrong: the first returns a pointer to a variable that is local to the function. The second does the same, this time with a reference.

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C++ allows the return of pointers and references because it's entirely legal.

Consider this (and I do not advocate this, because returning memory allocated within a function in a naked sense is mostly discouraged due to a question of ownership):

MyObject* create() {
    return new MyObject();
}; // eo create

All fine. We're returning a pointer, and we allocated the object dynamically. Logically nothing wrong (other than allocating and returning a pointer without ownership... booo!). And yet, some functions are going to have to do this:

void* operator new(std::size_t size) {
    return malloc(size);
};

References (as you seem to have got a little confused), are also utterly viable, even on pointer allocated things. If we have a manager that maintains the instances, they can return a reference quite simply:

class Manager {
private:
    std::list<MyClass*> objects_;

public:
    Manager() {
    };
    ~Manager() {
        for(auto& o : objects_) {
            delete o;
        };
    };

    Myclass& create() {
        o = new MyClass();
        objects_.push_back(o);
        return *o;
    };
};

The above is perfectly fine, as the manager manages the lifetime of the objects.

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