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After having had code-golf contests on ordinary mathematical expressions, I just thought it would also be quite interesting how short an evaluation function for postfix notation (RPN) can be.

Examples for RPN:

1 2 + == 3
1 2 + 3 * == 9
0 1 2 3 + + - 2 6 * + 3 / 1 - == 1
3 2 / 2.0 + == 3.5

To make things shorter, only +, -, * and /, all just in their binary version, must be supported. Operators/Operands are delimited by one space, divsions by zero don't have to be handled.

The resulting code should be a function that takes the postfix string as input and returns the resulting number.

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3  
Bad spec, voted to close. Input format (any whitespace, single space; floating point)? I assume the '=' are meant to show output? Output format? Dvision by zero? –  Brian Oct 8 '09 at 16:36
2  
meta.stackexchange.com/questions/24242/… has some suggestions concerning code-golf questions –  dmckee Oct 8 '09 at 16:45
    
It's a community wiki, so... –  PiPeep Oct 8 '09 at 22:19
2  
@PiPeep, "It's community wiki" is an excuse now? –  strager Oct 8 '09 at 22:38
    
It's normal to have a "no use of eval" rule, otherwise the problem is reduced to a boring RE in almost all scripting languages. –  DigitalRoss Oct 10 '09 at 0:43
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21 Answers

dc

4 chars

Yes, this is a very cheap approach:

$ cat rpn
9k?p
$ echo "3 2 / 2.0 +" | dc -f rpn
3.500000000
$ echo "1 2 + 3 *" | dc -f rpn
9

9k sets the floating precision to 9 spots after the decimal; ? reads a line from stdin and immediately evaluates it; p prints the top number on the stack. dc -f rpn executes the file named rpn.

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I was just going to run off and do dc. Good thing I scrolled down –  gnibbler Oct 10 '09 at 1:03
    
Heh, but you wouldn't want to be charged for the size of dc.c :-) –  DigitalRoss Oct 10 '09 at 1:12
10  
dc surely has a smaller source base than Perl, Python, Haskell, Ruby, etc... right? :) –  Mark Rushakoff Oct 10 '09 at 12:51
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Scheme

(define (rpn . args)
  (define (p s a)
    (if (procedure? a)
        (cons (a (cadr s) (car s)) (cddr s))
        (cons a s)))
  (car (fold-left p '() args)))

Usage

(rpn 1 2 + 3 +) ;=> 6
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For non-Schemers, bear in mind that this is effectively using a sophisticated form of eval (exploiting the reader directly). Technically, the question did say "take the [...] string as input", but since this solution is so clever, I think it's worth the upvote. :-) –  Daniel Spiewak Jun 6 '10 at 20:51
    
@Daniel Spiewak: This has nothing to with eval. Scheme has 1st class procedures, and all that is done is moving the arguments about so it can be applied. –  leppie Jun 7 '10 at 5:24
    
It's still not taking a string, which is part of the requirements. As I said, it's not really eval because you're exploiting Lisp's homoiconicity, but just because Lisp has a more sophisticated form of metaprogramming doesn't make it valid. The restriction on eval is generically to prevent the use of such metaprogramming, since it puts static languages at such a heavy disadvantage in these little competitions. –  Daniel Spiewak Jun 7 '10 at 14:23
    
@Daniel Spiewak: if it was a string, I would have to eval it :) –  leppie Jun 7 '10 at 15:27
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PostScript - 114 (no eval) 113 (with eval)

No eval, except on individual tokens, which isn't really eval.

{[/+{add}/-{sub}/*{mul}/{div}/D{dup()ne{token pop dup where{pop load}if exch D}if}>>begin[exch D pop]{exec}forall}

Usage:

(0 1 2 3 + + - 2 6 * + 3 / 1 -)
{[/+{add}/-{sub}/*{mul}/{div}/D{dup()ne{token pop dup where{pop load}if exch D}if}>>begin[exch D pop]{exec}forall}
exec ==

-> 1.0

Note that this is the standard way of executing an unnamed procedure and that the procedure itself does not print the output value (though it takes in a string and returns a value, as specified in the instructions).

Replacing operators with PS ones, then executing (that is, eval), for one byte less:

{[{+ add - sub * mul/ div D{dup()ne{token pop dup where{pop load}if exch D}if}}aload/>>begin[exch D pop]cvx exec}

This version would have been 46 characters, but unfortunately '/' is a special character in PS so any expressions with division would fail. Here's the 46-character version, with 'd' substituting for '/'.

{cvx[/+{add}/-{sub}/*{mul}/d{div}>>begin exec}
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If you say that eval on individual tokens is "2+3", then it is eval –  user216441 Jun 6 '10 at 21:08
    
'/' will tokenize as a literal empty name. If you cvx exec, you can execute it. –  luser droog Oct 27 '12 at 0:42
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Perl, 73 characters, corrected

sub r{push @_,m{^[-+*/]$}?
eval"pop(\@_)$_".pop:$_ for split" ",shift;pop}

Linebreak is for clarity only.

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I guess it's unclear from the problem statement whether it's required or not, but if the input or anything on the stack goes negative, this kinda doesn't work too good... –  ephemient Oct 8 '09 at 23:12
    
Oops, my mistake. It looks like it's an input processing bug only though; "0 10 - 10 *" gives -100 just fine; "-10 10 *" freaks out :) –  hobbs Oct 9 '09 at 4:08
    
Ah you're right, it was an input bug only; things on the stack going negative is okay. Well, it's all better now :) –  ephemient Oct 9 '09 at 14:55
    
Would it be shorter to condition on /\d/ rather than on the set of operators? Then you could also use -10 as a token. –  mob Oct 13 '09 at 7:56
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From Wikipedia / Haskell,

calc = foldl f [] . words
  where 
    f (x:y:zs) "+" = (y + x):zs
    f (x:y:zs) "-" = (y - x):zs
    f (x:y:zs) "*" = (y * x):zs
    f (x:y:zs) "/" = (y / x):zs
    f xs y = read y : xs

can be shortened to 108 characters.

c=foldl(&)[].words where(x:y:z)&"+"=y+x:z;(x:y:z)&"-"=y-x:z;(x:y:z)&"*"=y*x:z;(x:y:z)&"/"=y/x:z;z&y=read y:z

Of course, one could always "cheat" with Perl: 83 characters

sub c{local($_)=@_;1while+s#(-?[\d.]+) (-?[\d.]+) ([-+/*])(?!\S)#eval"$1$3$2"#e;$_}
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Python 2.6 - 89 chars with newlines

Reads expression from first line of STDIN. Only works with integers.

E=[]
P=E.pop
for t in raw_input().split():E+=[t>"/"and t or`eval(P(-2)+t+P())`]
print P()
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Python - 157 (without using eval)

the try/except is indented with tabs


def f(s):
 E=s.split();i=0
 while len(E)>1:
    try:a,b=map(float,E[i:i+2]);c=E[i+2];E[i:i+3]=[[a+b,a-b,a*b,a/b]["+-*/".index(c)]];i=0
    except:i+=1
 return E[0]
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Ruby, 80, RE, eval

Really, it should be stated whether eval is permitted. (I suggest no.) Anyway, run each with ruby -a -p rpn.rb

s=[]
$F.each { |e|
  s << if /\d/===e
    e.to_f
  else
    a,b = s.pop 2
    eval "a %s b" % e
  end
}
$_ = s.pop

Ruby, 107, RE, no eval

s=[]
$F.each { |e|
  s << if e=~/\d/ 
    e.to_f
  else
    a,b = s.pop 2
    { ?+ => a+b, ?* => a*b, ?- => a-b, ?/ => a/b }[e[0]]
  end
}
$_ = s.pop

Ruby, 109, no RE, no eval

s=[]
$F.each { |e|
  s << if '*+/-'[e]
    a,b = s.pop 2
    {'+' => a + b, '-' => a - b, '*' => a * b, '/' => a / b}[e]
  else
    e.to_f
  end
}
$_ = s.pop
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C, 142 chars

Whitespace added for your sanity.

s[99],*t=s,y;
e(char*x)
{
  while(y=*x)
    y & 16 ?
      *++t = strtol(x,&x,10)
    :
      (y+1 & 4 ?
        (t[-1] += y&2 ? *t : -*t)
      :
        y & 2 ?
          y & 1 ?
            (t[-1] /= *t)
          :
            (t[-1] *= *t)
        :
          t++,
          t--,
          x++);
  return *t;
}
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Perl 115 char

Without eval.

sub Y{push@s,@_}sub Z{pop@s}$_=<>;for(split){/-/&&Y-&Z+Z;/\+/&&Y&Z+Z;
y@/@*@&&Y 1/Z;/\*/&&Y&Z*Z;/\d/&&Y$_}print&Z,$/

Maintains a stack of operands in @s. When an operator + - * / is encountered, pop two elements of the stack, perform the operation, and push them back onto the stack. Pops and prints the top of the stack when we run out of input.

/ is a special case:

y@/@*@ && push @s,1/(pop @s)

When / is encountered, replace the top of the stack with its reciprocal and change the operation to *. We could do something similar with +/-, but it would cost a character.

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Python 3

111 chars

Reads statement from stdin:

$ echo "3 2 / 2.0 +" | python3 q.py
3.5
L=[]
p=L.pop
a=L.append
for w in input().split():a(str(eval("1.*"+p(-2)+w+p()))if w in"-*+/"else w)
print(p())

Python 2.X

114 chars

L=[]
p=L.pop
a=L.append
for w in raw_input().split():a(str(eval("1.*"+p(-2)+w+p()))if w in"-*+/"else w)
print p()
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Clojure - 193 chars.

I really like the Scheme answer, as it's short and simple. This is made complicated by taking in a string as an argument.

Golf'd (remaining whitespace is important):

(def f first)(def $
#(if(>(count%)0)(let[o{"*"*"/"/"+"+"-"-}](if(o(f%))(recur(next%)(cons((o(f%))(second%2)(f%2))(nnext%2)))(recur(next%)(cons(Float.(f%))%2))))(f%2)))(def
r #($(.split%" ")[]))

Call like so: (r "1 2 +").

Ungolf'd:

(defn rpn
  ([stmt] (rpn (.split stmt " ") [])) ;split the string by spaces, use an empty vector as a stack
  ([in stack]
    (if (> (count in) 0)              ;if there's something to process '
      (let [ops {"*" *                ;here, we map strings to their respective functions
                 "/" /
                 "+" +
                 "-" -}]
        (if (ops (first in))          ;check if the next item to process is an operator
          (recur 
            (next in) 
            (cons                     ;stick the result of the operation at the head of the stack
              ((ops (first in))  ;execute the operation on...
                (second stack)   ; the second item in the stack and...
                (first stack))   ; the first item in the stack
              (nnext stack)))  ;we've consumed the first two items, so disregard them '
          (recur
            (next in)
            (cons 
              (Float. (first in))     ;convert the string to a float, and stick it in the stack
              stack))))
      (first stack))))                ;return the head of the stack.  should also be the only item in the stack

In order to make the short version... shorter, first is redefined as just f. Doing that to any other func would cost more chars than would be slimmed down, or would be a no-win game. Other than that no fancy tricks were used.

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If there were a way to call a string's content as a function, there would be a quick way to shave off a lot of chars by eliminating the string-to-func mapping. Unfortunately I'm not that awesome with Clojure yet to know if that's possible. –  nilamo Oct 10 '09 at 6:01
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F#: 196 chars

Minimized code:

let rpn input=String.split[' ']input|>Seq.fold (fun xs x->match((["*",(*);"+",(+);"-",(-);"/",(/)]|>Map.of_list).TryFind x),xs with|Some f,x::y::rest->f x y::rest|None,xs->xs@[float x])[]|>List.hd

Readable code:

let rpn input =
    String.split [' '] input
    |> Seq.fold (fun xs x ->
        let lookup = ["*", (*); "+", (+); "-", (-); "/" ,(/)] |> Map.of_list
        match lookup.TryFind x, xs with
        | Some f, x::y::rest -> f x y::rest
        | None, xs -> xs @ [float x]) []
    |> List.hd

Explanation: I have a lookup table which maps strings to functions. If we find a function f in the lookup table, we replace the first two values on our eval queue -- which is really a stack -- with f(pop first two values off stack). If we don't find our function, we append the value to end of our queue. Finally, we return the first value from the top of our queue.

Guaranteed to be very inefficient, would probably get you fired from your job if implemented like this in practice.

Here's the function in fsi:

val rpn : string -> float

> rpn "1 2 +";;
val it : float = 3.0
> rpn "1 2 + 3 *";;
val it : float = 9.0
> rpn "0 1 2 3 + + - 2 6 * + 3 / 1 -";;
val it : float = 1.0
> rpn "3 2 / 2.0 +";;
val it : float = 3.5
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Scala 171 Characters

def e(s: String)=(List[Int]()/:s.split(" ")){case(x::y::t,"+")=>x+y::t case(x::y::t,"-")=>x-y::t case(x::y::t,"*")=>x*y::t case(x::y::t,"/")=>x/y::t case(t,n)=>n.toInt::t}

Ungolfed

def eval(s: String) = s.split(" ").foldLeft(List[Int]()) {
  case (x :: y :: tail, "+") => x + y :: tail
  case (x :: y :: tail, "-") => x - y :: tail
  case (x :: y :: tail, "*") => x * y :: tail
  case (x :: y :: tail, "/") => x / y :: tail
  case (tail, n) => n.toInt :: tail
}

Pretty close to the Haskell version, actually. The main difference is that Scala is substantially more verbose that Haskell (and not just in type annotations).

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JavaScript

With Eval: 141 Characters

function Z(o){o=o.split(' ');s=[];for(i in o)if(o[i].match(/^[0-9.]+$/))
s.push(o[i]);else{f=s.pop();s.push(eval(s.pop()+o[i]+f))}return s[0]}

Without Eval: 171 Characters

function Z(o){o=o.split(' ');s=[];for(i in o)if(o[i].match(/^[0-9.]+$/))
s.push(+o[i]);else{f=s.pop();p=s.pop();
s.push([p+f,p-f,p*f,p/f]['+-*/'.indexOf(o[i])])}return s[0]}

(New lines are all for readability)

share|improve this answer
    
+1. The trick to use an array and indexOf to avoid the more verbose switch is kind of clever. I'd change the regexp in the if to this, though: if(!isNaN(parseFloat(o[i]))). It adds 1 char, but that way your function could handle negative numbers and scientific notation. –  Juan Pablo Califano Jun 6 '10 at 22:23
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Perl - 87 chars

.

sub e{$_=$_[0];0while s/(-?\d+(\.\d+)?) (-?\d+(\.\d+)?) ([-+*\/])/eval("$1$5$3")/ge;$_}

Or in a more readable fashion:

sub e{
    $_ = $_[0];
    0 while (s/(-?\d+(\.\d+)?) (-?\d+(\.\d+)?) ([-+*\/])/eval("$1$5$3")/ge)
    $_
}

Call:

print e("1 2.0 + 3 *")
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Input validation isn't in the spirit of golf! Use \S+ for the numbers and save 20 characters ;) –  hobbs Oct 9 '09 at 15:14
    
Thanks hobbs I can use that too ;) –  gnibbler Oct 10 '09 at 3:03
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Python - 171 (without using eval)

hobbs idea to replace the [--9] with \S


import re
def g(x):a,b,c=x.groups();a,b=map(float,[a,b]);return "%s"%[a-b,a*b,a/b,a+b]["-*/".find(c)]
f=lambda s:s.count(' ')and f(re.sub("(\S+) (\S+) ([*-/])",g,s,1))or s

Python - 177 (without using eval)

This is slightly longer than my other Python solution, but
How often do you get to use [--9] in a regexp?


import re
def g(x):a,b,c=x.groups();a,b=map(float,[a,b]);return "%s"%[a-b,a*b,a/b,a+b]["-*/".find(c)] 
f=lambda s:s.count(' ')and f(re.sub("([--9]+) ([--9]+) ([*-/])",g,s,1))or s
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Lua, 186 characters

function f(v)s,r={},table.remove for x in v:gmatch("[^%s]+")do n=x=="+"and r(s)+r(s)or x=="-"and -r(s)+r(s)or x=="*"and r(s)*r(s)or x=="/"and 1/r(s)*r(s)or x s[#s+1]=n end return s[1]end

Or, using loadstring() (similar to eval), 150 characters.

function f(v)s,r={},table.remove for x in v:gmatch("[^%s]+")do n=tonumber(x)or loadstring("return "..r(s,#s-1)..x..r(s))()s[#s+1]=n end return s[1]end
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Nice one (the first version). But you can remove the whitespace before the and, or, and do keywords to save 9 characters, putting you ahead of F# and Clojure! –  John Zwinck Nov 10 '09 at 13:35
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FORTH 42 characters

This is the answer in ciforth:

[1]: ciforth

You force me to reimplement evaluate? fine!

: == . ;
: E 1 ARG[] SET-SRC INTERPRET ;

This illustrates the assignment is silly. Adapt evaluate but if you have it you can't use it. So I just reimplement EVALUATE. As there is no restriction in using the factors of evaluate the reimplementation is very short in a highly factored language.

Usage : after lina -c e.frt

e '78 8 * == '

gives the expected 624

The statically linked executable for the ``e'' program is 30Kbyte (linux 32) Without even looking I know that no language here comes close. (Other Forths migh, like 4th).

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Perl 63 chars

function :

sub r{$_=pop;1while(s!(\S+) (\S+) ([*/+-])!eval"$1$3$2"!eg);$_}

call :

print r("12 3 / 6 6 + *"),"\n";

result :

48
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F# - Complete with REPL

Readable:

let execute = Seq.fold (|>)
let binary f = function _ :: a :: b :: t -> f b a :: t
let add      = binary (+) 
let subtract = binary (-) 
let multiply = binary (*) 
let divide   = binary (/)
let digit v = function x :: t -> 10 * x + v :: t
let enter s = 0 :: s
let codes = 
    Map.ofList [ 
        '0', digit 0 
        '1', digit 1 
        '2', digit 2 
        '3', digit 3 
        '4', digit 4 
        '5', digit 5 
        '6', digit 6 
        '7', digit 7 
        '8', digit 8 
        '9', digit 9 
        '+', add 
        '-', subtract 
        '*', multiply 
        '/', divide 
        ' ', enter]
let flip f a b = f b a
let compile = flip Map.find codes |> Seq.map
let eval = compile >> execute [0] >> Seq.head
let rec repl () = System.Console.ReadLine() |> eval |> printf "%i\n>" |> repl 
printf "Welcome to TinyRPN\n>" 
repl ()

Usage:

Welcome to TinyRPN 
>1 2 + 4 * 2 / 42 + 
48
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