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I'm looking for a fast algorithm with gives me all the indexes of the set bits in a BitSet object. This is slow:

BitSet bitSet = ...
Collection<Integer> indexes = new ArrayList<Integer>(bitSet.cardinality());
int nextSetBit = bitSet.nextSetBit(0);
for (int i = 0; i < bitSet.cardinality(); ++i ) {
    indexes.add(nextSetBit);
    nextSetBit = bitSet.nextSetBit(nextSetBit + 1);
}
...

Any help is appreciated!

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how did you measure? –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Mar 13 '13 at 16:18
    
Please read this nice article java-performance.info/bit-sets –  Shmil The Cat Mar 13 '13 at 16:19

2 Answers 2

No need to use bitSet.cardinality() at all:

for (int i = bitSet.nextSetBit(0); i != -1; i = bitSet.nextSetBit(i + 1)) {
    indexes.add(i);
}
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Change the loop (you increase the complexity to O(N^2) because you call cardinality() in each loop iteration):

for (int e = bitSet.cardinality(), i = 0; i < e; ++i ) {
    indexes.add(nextSetBit);
    nextSetBit = bitSet.nextSetBit(nextSetBit + 1);
}
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I tried to initialize bitSet.cardinality() just once, didn't help.. –  myborobudur Mar 13 '13 at 16:55
    
@myborobudur If it didn't help your perceived slowness most likely is not caused by the BitSet (either its so small it doesn't matter or the autoboxing to Integer overshadows it by far). Use a profiler to measure. –  Durandal Mar 13 '13 at 17:02

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