Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I get a segmentation fault when freeing the buffer 'pkt' after the function sendto()

u_char* create_pkt(u_char* pkt)
{
  ....
  pkt = (u_char *)malloc(40);
  ...
  return pkt
}


int main()
{
 ....
 u_char* pkt;
 create_pkt(pkt);
 if (sendto(sd, pkt, 40, 0, (struct sockaddr *)&sin, sizeof(struct sockaddr)) < 0)
 free(pkt);
 }

the debugging information shows:

Program received signal SIGSEGV, Segmentation fault.
0x0000003897482864 in __GI___libc_free (mem=0x7fffffffe010) at malloc.c:2986

what is wrong with this? thanks!

2986      ar_ptr = arena_for_chunk(p);
2986      ar_ptr = arena_for_chunk(p);
share|improve this question
    
Why is create_pkt() even taking an argument? –  NPE Mar 13 '13 at 16:14

3 Answers 3

The create_pkt function returns the newly allocated value, so you'll need to use that in the calling function.

pkt =create_pkt(pkt);

Otherwise the program will just ignore the pointer to the allocated memory and use the original (unassigned) value of pkt.

Edit: if you want to use the argument as something to assign the value to, you can write something like this

void create_pkt(u_char** pkt)
{
  ....
  *pkt = (u_char *)malloc(40);
  ...
}

and call it with

create_pkt(&pkt);

but I can't really recomment that.

share|improve this answer
    
ah, yes, so this means my function should be u_char* create_pkt() but not u_char* create_pkt(u_char *)? the argument is useless? –  user1944267 Mar 13 '13 at 16:16
    
In the current version, yes. Unless you use a "pointer-to-pointer" approach that lets you assign a value to the argument. And in that case, you won't need a return value. See edit to my answer. –  Mr Lister Mar 13 '13 at 16:18

u_char* create_pkt(u_char* pkt) copies your pointer and then allocates it inside, but only allocates the copy. When the function returns your original pointer is still as it was, unallocated.

Now you can either return a pointer from this function or pass in a double pointer u_char** pkt and assign the address of pkt to it.

pkt = create_ptk(pkt); now you'll have allocated pkt.

for double pointer version this is how you'd call it:

create_pkt(&pkt);

share|improve this answer

You are trying to allocate the memory and loosing the allocated reference. So the garbage is sent and then attempt to release kills it.

u_char* create_pkt()
{
   u_char* pkt;
   ....
   pkt = (u_char *)malloc(40);
  ...
   return pkt;
}


int main()
{
   ....
   u_char* pkt;
   pkt = create_pkt();
   if (sendto(sd, pkt, 40, 0, (struct sockaddr *)&sin, sizeof(struct sockaddr)) < 0)
   free(pkt);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.