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We have the following scenario:

  1. MVVM userinterface where a user can place his password (actually a PasswordBox)
  2. Server that shall do some work
  3. Server connects to some Database that requires authentification

And I already read this Question on PasswordBox in MVVM

But there is no answer on how to do! Just lots over "never ever do that".

What is the correct way of passing a password around? How to resolve the security issues?

There is no proper way of Binding to the PasswordBox and the Password shall not be stored somewhere, okay.

So, what is the MVVM way of doing such things?

Even if the pattern is broken, is there a good way to achieve such things?

Thought of a Func<string> to retrieve it, but without Binding this will get a mess...

Update Same for initialising the PasswordBox from a (hopefully encrypted) password store. Isn't that breaking the MVVM pattern? The User does not want to enter the password each time he starts the application or wants to work with the database I believe.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Personally I just pass the entire PasswordBox control to my LoginCommand

I know it breaks MVVM because the ViewModel layer now references a View-specific object, but I think in this specific case it's OK.

So I might have XAML that looks like this:

<Button Content="Login" 
        Command="{Binding LoginCommad}" 
        CommandParameter="{Binding ElementName=MyPasswordBox}" />

And a LoginCommand that does something like this:

private void Login(object obj)
{
    PasswordBox pwBox = obj as PasswordBox;

    SomeBlackBoxClass.ValidatePassword(UserName, pwBox.Password);
}

I suppose you could also run some kind of encryption algorithm on the value and compare the hash of that value to the hash of the user's password too

private void Login(object obj)
{
    PasswordBox pwBox = obj as PasswordBox;
    var encryptedPassword = SomeLibrary.EncryptValue(pwBox.Password, someKey);

    if (encryptedPassword == User.EncryptedPassword)
        // Success
}

I'm no expert on the PasswordBox control or security, but I do know that you don't want to be storing the user's password in plain text anywhere in memory within your application

(Technically, it's stored as plain text in PasswordBox.Password - you can use something like Snoop to verify this if you want - however typically the PasswordBox doesn't exist for longer than it takes the user to login, and the actual "password" is just text entered by the user, which may or may not be correct. A keylogger could get you the same information.)

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2  
Thinking outside the box, pun intended... –  Charleh Mar 13 '13 at 16:43
    
So I shall really hand over a PasswordBox to the Server? –  Mare Infinitus Mar 13 '13 at 16:50
1  
@MareInfinitus Personally I would encrypt the PasswordBox.Password on the Client side, and pass the UserName and encrypted password to the server instead of passing the unencrypted PasswordBox object to the server. PasswordBox.Password is plain text, so I don't like keeping the PasswordBox object around longer than I have to. –  Rachel Mar 13 '13 at 16:53
    
Sounds good, will have a closer look at that. At the moment I have a command binding like you suggested –  Mare Infinitus Mar 13 '13 at 16:56
    
Please have a look at my updated question. –  Mare Infinitus Mar 13 '13 at 21:49

depending on your understanding of mvvm (in my way code behind is allowed in some cases)

so i create a PasswordBox and also a named TextBlock

Xaml

<PasswordBox Height="23" Width="156" PasswordChar="*" PasswordChanged="pwBoxUser_PasswordChanged"/>
<TextBlock Height="1" Width="1" Name="MD5pw" Text="{Binding Passwort, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged, Mode=OneWayToSource}" VerticalAlignment="Top" />

codebehind

    private void pwBoxUser_PasswordChanged(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var pBox =sender as PasswordBox;
        string blank=pBox.Password;

        //to crypt my blank Password
        var sMD5 = myMD5.toMD5(blank); //implement your crypt logic here
        blank ="";

        MD5pw.Text = sMD5;
    }

like you can see your password is save and you can easy bind to it

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So you now have a plain text password in PasswordBoxEdit and an encrypted one in your TextBlock. How does that make things safer? –  ProfK Nov 9 '13 at 6:36
    
it doesn't and it also doesn't make thinks worse, you can bind to it and you don't need to hand over your PasswordBox which is more MVVM than Rachel's version but it all still depends on you both solutions work and both are safe –  WiiMaxx Nov 11 '13 at 7:22
    
Yes, excuse me please. I'm new to WPF and I didn't know Password wouldn't bind because it's not a dependency property. –  ProfK Nov 11 '13 at 11:35

Leaving that article aside - there are a few other posts related to this particular question. You can achieve binding using attached properties. Please see:

  1. I believe this question is a duplicate of PasswordBox Binding
  2. The above post points to - http://www.wpftutorial.net/PasswordBox.html
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Thank you for your answer. But I really want the security! –  Mare Infinitus Mar 13 '13 at 16:54

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