Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there an integer square root somewhere in python, or in standard libraries? I want it to be exact (i.e. return an integer), and bark if there's no solution.

At the moment I rolled my own naive one:

def isqrt(n):
  i = int(math.sqrt(n) + 0.5)
  if i**2 == n:
    return i
  raise ValueError('input was not a perfect square')

But it's ugly and I don't really trust it for large integers. I could iterate through the squares and give up if I've exceeded the value, but I assume it would be kinda slow to do something like that. Also I guess I'd probably be reinventing the wheel, something like this must surely exist in python already...

share|improve this question
2  
It's not a requirement that comes up often so there's no built-in. There's nothing wrong with the solution you have, but I'd make one stylistic change - reverse the condition of the if so the return comes last. –  Mark Ransom Mar 13 '13 at 16:22
2  
Can't it overflow/screw up for large inputs because of working with floats? –  wim Mar 13 '13 at 16:24
4  
@wim: it can and will. –  DSM Mar 13 '13 at 16:24
    
code.activestate.com/recipes/…\ –  NPE Mar 13 '13 at 16:24
1  
It will overflow when n becomes too large to fit in a float without truncation, which is at 2**53. Even so it might still work because of the rounding you do to the result. Are you really going to be working with numbers that large? –  Mark Ransom Mar 13 '13 at 16:32
show 1 more comment

7 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Newton's method works perfectly well on integers:

def isqrt(n):
    x = n
    y = (x + n // x) // 2
    while y < x:
        x = y
        y = (x + n // x) // 2
    return x

This returns the largest integer x for which x * x does not exceed n. If you want to check if the result is exactly the square root, simply perform the multiplication to check if n is a perfect square.

I discuss this algorithm, and three other algorithms for calculating square roots, at my blog.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your function fails for large inputs:

In [26]: isqrt((10**100+1)**2)

ValueError: input was not a perfect square

There is a recipe on the ActiveState site which should hopefully be more reliable since it uses integer maths only. It is based on an earlier StackOverflow question: Writing your own square root function

share|improve this answer
add comment

Sorry for the very late response; I just stumbled onto this page. In case anyone visits this page in the future, the python module gmpy2 is designed to work with very large inputs, and includes among other things an integer square root function.

Example:

>>> import gmpy2
>>> gmpy2.isqrt((10**100+1)**2)
mpz(10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000001L)
>>> gmpy2.isqrt((10**100+1)**2 - 1)
mpz(10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000L)

Granted, everything will have the "mpz" tag, but mpz's are compatible with int's:

>>> gmpy2.mpz(3)*4
mpz(12)

>>> int(gmpy2.mpz(12))
12

Download: https://code.google.com/p/gmpy/

share|improve this answer
add comment

One option would be to use the decimal module, and do it in sufficiently-precise floats:

import decimal

def isqrt(n):
    nd = decimal.Decimal(n)
    with decimal.localcontext() as ctx:
        ctx.prec = n.bit_length()
        i = int(nd.sqrt())
    if i**2 != n:
        raise ValueError('input was not a perfect square')
    return i

which I think should work:

>>> isqrt(1)
1
>>> isqrt(7**14) == 7**7
True
>>> isqrt(11**1000) == 11**500
True
>>> isqrt(11**1000+1)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<ipython-input-121-e80953fb4d8e>", line 1, in <module>
    isqrt(11**1000+1)
  File "<ipython-input-100-dd91f704e2bd>", line 10, in isqrt
    raise ValueError('input was not a perfect square')
ValueError: input was not a perfect square
share|improve this answer
add comment

Seems like you could check like this:

if int(math.sqrt(n))**2 == n:
    print n, 'is a perfect square'

Update:

As you pointed out the above fails for large values of n. For those the following looks promising, which is an adaptation of the example C code, by Martin Guy @ UKC, June 1985, for the relatively simple looking binary numeral digit-by-digit calculation method mentioned in the Wikipedia article Methods of computing square roots:

from math import ceil, log

def isqrt(n):
    res = 0
    bit = 4**int(ceil(log(n, 4))) if n else 0  # smallest power of 4 >= the argument
    while bit:
        if n >= res + bit:
            n -= res + bit
            res = (res >> 1) + bit
        else:
            res >>= 1
        bit >>= 2
    return res

if __name__ == '__main__':
    from math import sqrt  # for comparison purposes

    for i in range(17)+[2**53, (10**100+1)**2]:
        is_perfect_sq = isqrt(i)**2 == i
        print '{:21,d}:  math.sqrt={:12,.7G}, isqrt={:10,d} {}'.format(
            i, sqrt(i), isqrt(i), '(perfect square)' if is_perfect_sq else '')

Output:

                    0:  math.sqrt=           0, isqrt=         0 (perfect square)
                    1:  math.sqrt=           1, isqrt=         1 (perfect square)
                    2:  math.sqrt=    1.414214, isqrt=         1
                    3:  math.sqrt=    1.732051, isqrt=         1
                    4:  math.sqrt=           2, isqrt=         2 (perfect square)
                    5:  math.sqrt=    2.236068, isqrt=         2
                    6:  math.sqrt=     2.44949, isqrt=         2
                    7:  math.sqrt=    2.645751, isqrt=         2
                    8:  math.sqrt=    2.828427, isqrt=         2
                    9:  math.sqrt=           3, isqrt=         3 (perfect square)
                   10:  math.sqrt=    3.162278, isqrt=         3
                   11:  math.sqrt=    3.316625, isqrt=         3
                   12:  math.sqrt=    3.464102, isqrt=         3
                   13:  math.sqrt=    3.605551, isqrt=         3
                   14:  math.sqrt=    3.741657, isqrt=         3
                   15:  math.sqrt=    3.872983, isqrt=         3
                   16:  math.sqrt=           4, isqrt=         4 (perfect square)
9,007,199,254,740,992:  math.sqrt=9.490627E+07, isqrt=94,906,265
100,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,020,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,001:  math.sqrt=      1E+100, isqrt=10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,001 (perfect square)
share|improve this answer
1  
fails for large inputs –  wim Mar 13 '13 at 16:34
    
@wim: True...I believe the last update I made to my answer fixes that shortcoming and is therefore a very usable solution. –  martineau Mar 14 '13 at 15:41
add comment

Floats cannot be precisely represented on computers. You can test for a desired proximity setting epsilon to a small value within the accuracy of python's floats.

def isqrt(n):
  epsilon = .00000000001
  i = int(n**.5 + 0.5)
  if abs(i**2 - n) < epsilon:
    return i
  raise ValueError('input was not a perfect square')
share|improve this answer
    
This too seems to fail for larger values of n. Newton's method looks promising or the decimal.Decimal solution. –  Octipi Mar 13 '13 at 17:14
add comment

Try this condition (no additional computation):

def isqrt(n):
  i = math.sqrt(n)
  if i != int(i):
    raise ValueError('input was not a perfect square')  
  return i

If you need it to return an int (not a float with a trailing zero) then either assign a 2nd variable or compute int(i) twice.

share|improve this answer
    
An alternative can be if not i.is_integer(). Anyway, this function fails for big inputs, where the number cannot be represented as float(and probably even before that). –  Bakuriu Mar 13 '13 at 16:28
    
Try calling this function with (10**10)**2-1 and see it mistakenly think that the argument is a perfect square. –  NPE Mar 13 '13 at 16:28
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.