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I am trying to plot means with standard deviations using the error.bars and it works quite good. I know I could also use the ggplot approach but I could not implement that for my data...

So far so good, the problem that I ran into now, is that not all variables on the x-axis are printed, in fact only every second or so.

In boxplot, I could fix this with the command, names, las=2. Is there something similar for the error.bars function? I could not find anything in the manual.

Here's the code I am using:

psych:::error.bars(orderedcols,sd=TRUE,add=TRUE,arrow.len=0.05,bars=TRUE, xlab="Adjectives", ylab="Mean Intensity", main="Mean Intensities and Standard Deviations")

EDIT:

dput(orderedcols) structure(list(brilliant = c(50, 82, 80, 12, 80, 80, 85, 72, 80, 85, 65, 100, 90, 97, 85, 95, 100, 100), ingenious = c(75, 70, 50, 79, 85, 80, 100, 50, 95, 90, 50, 100, 100, 1, 80, 83, 83, 100), intelligent = c(40, 70, 45, 87, 75, 60, 80, 42, 86, 80, 29, 100, 50, 45, 61, 77, 40, 90), bright = c(20, 60, 40, 58, 65, 50, 75, 40, 77, 55, 50, 58, 50, 56, 76, 83, 30, 75), smart = c(30, 62, 25, 47, 45, 50, 50, 32, 54, 75, 27, 81, 70, 69, 40, 85, 29, 80), brainy = c(60, 66, 20, 52, 70, 60, 50, 20, 66, 35, 31, -9, -10, 44, 78, 91, 50, 70), foolish = c(-15, -35, -20, -44, -30, -10, -20, -10, -32, -25, -27, -23, -10, -15, -25, 43, -36, -10), daft = c(-10, -60, -30, -14, -20, -10, -77, 0, -90, -20, -36, -61, 10, 0, -33, -100, -21, -50 ), dim = c(-35, -62, -20, 8, -80, -30, -35, -24, -60, -35, -34, -9, -100, -34, -83, -71, -27, -20), dumb = c(-25, -50, -60, -37, -40, -30, -25, -29, -76, -75, -78, -37, 0, -30, -39, -91, -38, -10), mindless = c(-50, -55, -60, -12, -30, -50, -25, 0, -62, -50, -100, -100, 0, -6, -39, -52, -59, -25), inane = c(-20, -80, -30, -6, -35, -30, -90, -25, -50, -50, -38, -100, -75, -25, -12, -100, -22, -10), stupid = c(-25, -80, -30, -75, -50, -40, -80, -28, -37, -75, -41, -50, -11, -100, -51, -91, -36, -15), dimwitted = c(-50, -77, -20, -59, -40, -60, -66, -77, -45, -25, -32, -77, -100, -46, -74, -89, -39, -30), idiotic = c(-60, -91, -50, -26, -60, -50, -83, -41, -58, -80, 30, -86, -100, -46, -91, -89, -60, -40), moronic = c(-90, -87, -40, -19, -65, -60, -90, -85, -78, -75, -59, -100, -80, -22, -71, -95, -65, -15), brainless = c(-75, -85, -80, -55, -20, -100, -90, -35, -85, -90, -31, -100, -90, -73, -31, -63, -100, -95), imbecilic = c(-100, -95, -75, 31, -50, -75, -90, -100, -72, -85, -63, -98, -100, -33, -92, -90, -74, -100)), .Names = c("brilliant", "ingenious", "intelligent", "bright", "smart", "brainy", "foolish", "daft", "dim", "dumb", "mindless", "inane", "stupid", "dimwitted", "idiotic", "moronic", "brainless", "imbecilic"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(2L, 4L, 5L, 6L, 7L, 9L, 10L, 11L, 12L, 13L, 14L, 15L, 16L, 17L, 18L, 19L, 20L, 21L)) 11 72 50 42 40 32 20 -10 0 -24 -29 0 -25 -28 -77 -41 -85 -35 -100 12 80 95 86 77 54 66 -32 -90 -60 -76 -62 -50 -37 -45 -58 -78 -85 -72 13 85 90 80 55 75 35 -25 -20 -35 -75 -50 -50 -75 -25 -80 -75 -90 -85 14 65 50 29 50 27 31 -27 -36 -34 -78 -100 -38 -41 -32 30 -59 -31 -63 15 100 100 100 58 81 -9 -23 -61 -9 -37 -100 -100 -50 -77 -86 -100 -100 -98 16 90 100 50 50 70 -10 -10 10 -100 0 0 -75 -11 -100 -100 -80 -90 -100 17 97 1 45 56 69 44 -15 0 -34 -30 -6 -25 -100 -46 -46 -22 -73 -33 18 85 80 61 76 40 78 -25 -33 -83 -39 -39 -12 -51 -74 -91 -71 -31 -92 19 95 83 77 83 85 91 43 -100 -71 -91 -52 -100 -91 -89 -89 -95 -63 -90 20 100 83 40 30 29 50 -36 -21 -27 -38 -59 -22 -36 -39 -60 -65 -100 -74 21 100 100 90 75 80 70 -10 -50 -20 -10 -25 -10 -15 -30 -40 -15 -95 -100

P.S. can't add a photo, have too little reputation..

share|improve this question
    
<sigh> it's really pretty difficult to comment without a peep at the data you are using and the rest of the code you are using to plot. –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 13 '13 at 18:12
    
sorry, I'll add the dataframe that I am using right now –  henzelbensel Mar 13 '13 at 18:19
    
Great! If you can paste the output from running the R console command dput( mydataframe ) that will allow people to copy and paste it straight back into their R session to recreate your data. You can't copy/paste that –  Simon O'Hanlon Mar 13 '13 at 18:22
    
sorry about that, like that? –  henzelbensel Mar 13 '13 at 18:29
1  
The issue is simply that you're trying to plot more bars than you have room for. It looks like error.bars hard codes a call to axis to draw the axis labels, so you're not going to be able to adjust how they are drawn without modifying the code itself (which isn't that hard in this case). –  joran Mar 13 '13 at 19:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's actually pretty easy, I think: all you have to do is set the las graphical parameter before you run the error.bars command:

par(las=2)
error.bars(orderedcols,sd=TRUE,add=TRUE,arrow.len=0.05,bars=TRUE,
           xlab="Adjectives", ylab="Mean Intensity",
           main="Mean Intensities and Standard Deviations")

A ggplot2 solution (you could rotate the labels for this one too -- search on StackOverflow for how to do it -- but I chose to rotate the whole plot instead)

library("reshape2")
library("ggplot2")
theme_set(theme_bw())
ggplot(melt(orderedcols),aes(x=variable,y=value))+
    stat_summary(geom="bar",fun.y=mean,position="identity",fill="gray")+
    stat_summary(geom="errorbar",width=0.2,
                 fun.data=function(x) { data.frame(y=mean(x), 
                     ymin=mean(x)-sd(x),ymax=mean(x)+sd(x)) })+
    coord_flip()
share|improve this answer
    
<facepalm!> Totally forgot about setting las outside of the function first. –  joran Mar 13 '13 at 20:52
    
thanks, looks perfect to me! i did not no about the par function and that I could set the las outside the error.bars function even though that particular parameter is not included in it. –  henzelbensel Mar 13 '13 at 21:23

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