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I am using some classes which need to connect to databases. The connection is only really needed when performing a real action. I want to delay the connection phase until it is really needed. For that, I want to do something similar to this:

class MyClass

    def __init__(self):
        self.conn = None

    def connect(self):
        if self.conn : return
        self.conn = ConnectToDatabase()

    @connect
    def do_something1(self):
        self.conn.do_something1()

    @connect
    def do_something2(self):
        self.conn.do_something2()

But I do not know how to define the connect decorator for the class.

I could of course do something like this:

    def do_something1(self):
        self.connect()
        self.conn.do_something1()

But using decorators seems a more readable solution. Is it possible?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Rather than trying to decorate the functions that require connections, use a property for getting the connection itself.

class MyClass(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self._conn = None

    @property
    def conn(self):
        if self._conn is None:
            self._conn = ConnectToDatabase()
        return self._conn

    def do_something1(self):
        self.conn.do_something1()

    def do_something2(self):
        self.conn.do_something2()

As for a straight decorator example, playing off F.J's answer:

def prerequisite(prerequisite_function, *pre_args, **pre_kwargs):
    def wrapper(func):
        def wrapped(self, *args, **kwargs):
            prerequisite_function(self, *pre_args, **pre_kwargs)
            return func(self, *args, **kwargs)
        return wrapped
    return builder

 class MyClass(object):

     def __init__(self):
         self.conn = None

     def connect(self):
         if self.conn is None:
             self.conn = ConnectToDatabase()

     @prerequisite(connect)
     def do_something(self):
         self.conn.do_something()

You could also make prerequisite more robust by making it create descriptors so that it can behave correctly for functions and static methods as well as class and instance methods.

share|improve this answer
    
This is great, thanks. When will I stop learning? –  jeckyll2hide Mar 13 '13 at 17:29
    
When you die. :) –  Silas Ray Mar 13 '13 at 17:29
    
If you ever stop learning, you are obsolete and will be replaced with a newer model. –  kindall Mar 13 '13 at 17:37

I do like sr2222's approach of using a property for getting the connection, however here is an approach with decorators which may be useful or at least informative (use of functools.wraps() is optional):

import functools

def require_connection(f):
    @functools.wraps(f)
    def wrapped(self, *args, **kwargs):
        self.connect()
        return f(self, *args, **kwargs)
    return wrapped

class MyClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.conn = None

    def connect(self):
        if self.conn : return
        self.conn = ConnectToDatabase()

    @require_connection
    def do_something1(self):
        self.conn.do_something1()

    @require_connection
    def do_something2(self):
        self.conn.do_something2()
share|improve this answer
    
I haven't tried this, but looks interesting. Nevertheless, sr2222 reply does in a simpler way what I wanted to do, and although this is directly replying to my question, I prefer the other solution. –  jeckyll2hide Mar 13 '13 at 17:42
    
Why even make that a method on the class? require_connection is going to be available yet confusingly useless/broken at any point after the class has been created. Either make it a straight helper function or make it more meaningful with a metaclass. –  Silas Ray Mar 13 '13 at 17:45
    
@sr2222 Good point, I moved require_connection out of the class. –  Andrew Clark Mar 13 '13 at 17:55
    
Oh, right as I post up my generic alternative. ;) –  Silas Ray Mar 13 '13 at 17:57

Similar to sr2222's solution, but calling it what it is: a cached_property.

The code is more compact, uses reusable building blocks, and in my opinion more readable.

class MyClass(object):

    @cached_property
    def conn(self):
        return ConnectToDatabase()

    def do_something1(self):
        self.conn.do_something1()

    def do_something2(self):
        self.conn.do_something2()

The definition of cached_property is found here.

share|improve this answer
    
The property decorator is a built-in though, while cached_property is not. –  Silas Ray Mar 13 '13 at 18:03
    
correct. it is still a very useful building block. grab it once, use it plenty. –  shx2 Mar 13 '13 at 18:05

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