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I have to use an API provided by a DLL with a header like this

namespace ALongNameToType {
    class ALongNameToType {
        static void Foo();   
    }
}

Is there a way to use ALongNameToType::ALongNameToType::Foo without having to type ALongNameToType::ALongNameToType each time? I tried using using namespace ALongNameToType but got ambiguous symbol errors in Visual Studio. Changing the namespace name or removing it gives me linker errors.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 17 down vote accepted

I don't know what's ambiguous, but you can avoid all conflicts with other Foo functions like this:

namespace ALongNameToType {
    struct ALongNameToType {
        static void Foo();   
    };
}

typedef ALongNameToType::ALongNameToType Shortname;

int main() {
    Shortname::Foo();
}
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I forgot typedef totally... +1 –  AraK Oct 8 '09 at 17:54
    
you dont actually have to use struct instead of class, do you?? –  2am Oct 13 '13 at 9:36
1  
@2am: you don't have to, you could write class ALongNameToType { public: static void Foo(); }; if you prefer, but the code in the question needs fixing one way or the other. I generally use struct for types with no non-public members. You should lay out the conditions for using struct in whatever style guide applies to the code. Some people use struct specifically for POD types, or specifically for types whose definition will compile as C, or specifically for types with no user-defined constructors or member functions, or just use it haphazardly for types they consider "simple" ;-) –  Steve Jessop Oct 13 '13 at 9:37
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namespace myns = ALongNameToType;

It seems that you can't alias a class scope like this:

// second ALongNameToType is a class
namespace myns = ALongNameToType::ALongNameToType;

Maybe you could alias the function it self:

namespace foo
{
 class foo
 {
 public:
  static void fun()
  {

  }
 };
}

int main()
{
 void (*myfunc)() = foo::foo::fun;

 myfunc();
}
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using ALongNameToType::ALongNameToType::Foo;

if you just want to use it as Foo().

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Works for me on gcc4. –  Bill Oct 8 '09 at 18:28
3  
Unfortunately it doesn't work for me in Visual Studio 2008 error C2885: 'ALongNameToType::ALongNameToType::Foo': not a valid using-declaration at non-class scope –  Steven Oct 8 '09 at 20:52
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There are three ways to use using. One is for an entire namespace, one is for particular things in a namespace, and one is for a derived class saying it doesn't want to hide something declared/defined in a base class. You can use the second of those:

using ALongNameToType::ALongNameToType


Unfortunately this isn't working for you (due to the ambiguity of the namespace and the class having the same name). Combining this type of using with a previous answer should get rid of the ambiguity:

namespace alntt = ALongNameToType;
using alntt::ALongNameToType;

But once you've renamed the namespace, you really don't need the using statement (as long as you're comfortable writing the (shortened) namespace every time you use the class:

namespace alntt = ALongNameToType;
alntt::ALongNameToType a;
...
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This gives me error C2874: using-declaration causes a multiple declaration of 'ALongNameToType::ALongNameToType' in Visual Studio 2008 –  Steven Oct 8 '09 at 20:54
    
Oh well, it's useful in cases where there isn't ambiguity (eg., "using std::cout"). –  Max Lybbert Oct 9 '09 at 6:42
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