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I installed the pcap library on my linux system but when including it I get the errors

 /usr/include/pcap/bpf.h:88:1: error: unknown type name ‘u_int’
 /usr/include/pcap/bpf.h:108:2: error: unknown type name ‘u_int’
 /usr/include/pcap/bpf.h:1260:2: error: unknown type name ‘u_short’
 /usr/include/pcap/bpf.h:1261:2: error: unknown type name ‘u_char’
 /usr/include/pcap/bpf.h:1262:2: error: unknown type name ‘u_char’
 In file included from ../src/test.c:1:0:
 /usr/include/pcap/pcap.h:125:2: error: unknown type name ‘u_short’
 /usr/include/pcap/pcap.h:126:2: error: unknown type name ‘u_short’
 /usr/include/pcap/pcap.h:171:2: error: unknown type name ‘u_int’
 ...
 make: *** [src/test.o] Error 1

I included

 #include <pcap/pcap.h>
 #include <sys/types.h>
 #include <pcap-bpf.h>

in the program, what am I missing?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Make sure you do NOT define any of:

  • __STRICT_ANSI__
  • _ISOC99_SOURCE
  • _POSIX_SOURCE
  • _POSIX_C_SOURCE
  • _XOPEN_SOURCE
  • _SVID_SOURCE

when building your program; they may prevent the BSD data types, such as the ones the compile is complaining about, from being defined.

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No I didn't I simply compile it with 'gcc -std=c99 test.c -o test' –  wasp256 Mar 13 '13 at 19:26
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Actually, yes, you did define at least one of them, by specifying -std=c99. The GCC man page says -std= has the same effect as -ansi, and -ansi defines __STRICT_ANSI__. -std=c99 may define _ISOC99_SOURCE as well as, or instead of, __STRICT_ANSI__. -std=c99 means you want your code to be compiled as strict ISO C99, meaning it can't use any features not in ISO C99 - and libpcap isn't in ISO C99, so.... If you're trying to use C99 features and they're not supported by default, try -std=gnu99. –  Guy Harris Mar 13 '13 at 19:32
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Try adding

     -D_BSD_SOURCE

az a CFLAG to your Makefile.

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Alternatively, consider -D_GNU_SOURCE. This will allow you to use features derived from BSD without linking the BSD compatibility library. See the GNU documentation on feature test macros for more information on the different values that can be specified and when you need to use the BSD compatibility library. –  Trevor A. Sep 19 '13 at 12:59
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