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Is it possible to write a type trait, say is_callable<T> which tells if an object has an operator() defined? It is easy if the arguments to the call operator are known in advance, but not in the general case. I want the trait to return true if and only if there is at least one overloaded call operator defined.

This question is related and has a good answer, but it doesn't work on all types (only int convertible). Also, std::is_function works but only on real functions and not functors, I'm looking for a more general solution.

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2  
Is C++11 available? – Richard J. Ross III Mar 13 '13 at 18:51
    
This may be relevant – Andy Prowl Mar 13 '13 at 18:52
    
Do you have a list of possible argument types? If so, that makes it definitely possible. Not quite sure, however, about a generic overload, though. – Richard J. Ross III Mar 13 '13 at 19:11
    
Why do you need this? I mean, why would you want to know if something is callable if you don't know any of the argument types? Handling things like overloaded operators won't be possible if you don't know them. – mfontanini Mar 13 '13 at 19:15
    
@RichardJ.RossIII: yes C++11 is fine, and no I don't have a liste of argument types. – Antoine Mar 14 '13 at 9:27
up vote 18 down vote accepted

I think this trait does what you want. It detects operator() with any kind of signature even if it's overloaded and also if it's templatized:

template<typename T>
struct is_callable {
private:
    typedef char(&yes)[1];
    typedef char(&no)[2];

    struct Fallback { void operator()(); };
    struct Derived : T, Fallback { };

    template<typename U, U> struct Check;

    template<typename>
    static yes test(...);

    template<typename C>
    static no test(Check<void (Fallback::*)(), &C::operator()>*);

public:
    static const bool value = sizeof(test<Derived>(0)) == sizeof(yes);
};

Live demo.

The principle is based on Member Detector idiom. As it is, it will fail to compile if you pass it a non-class type, but that shouldn't be hard to fix, I just left it out for brevity. You can also extend it to report true for functions.

Of course it doesn't give you any info about the signature(s) of operator() whatsoever, but I believe that's not what you asked for, right?

EDIT for Klaim:

It's simple enough to make it work (return false) with non-class types. If you rename the above class to is_callable_impl, you can write this, for example:

template<typename T>
struct is_callable
    : std::conditional<
        std::is_class<T>::value,
        is_callable_impl<T>,
        std::false_type
    >::type
{ };
share|improve this answer
    
+1, you have the real solution. – Andy Prowl Mar 13 '13 at 23:30
    
Great! Good and short code, live demo and explanation. +1 for using liveworkspace.org, thanks. – Antoine Mar 14 '13 at 9:30
    
Nice but this don't compile if the type is not inheritable from, like int. I'm not sure how to modify it so that it work in this case (and should return false I guess). – Klaim Jun 30 '14 at 16:01
1  
@Klaim See the edit, hope that helps. – jrok Jun 30 '14 at 16:34
    
This is great but doesn't work for final types :( – Matt Clarkson Aug 29 '14 at 15:49

The answers here were helpful but I came here wanting something that could also spot whether something was callable regardless of whether it happened to be an object or a classic function. jrok's answer to this aspect of the problem, alas, didn't work because std::conditional actually evaluates the types of both arms!

So, here's a solution:

// Note that std::is_function says that pointers to functions
// and references to functions aren't functions, so we'll make our 
// own is_function_t that pulls off any pointer/reference first.

template<typename T>
using remove_ref_t = typename std::remove_reference<T>::type;

template<typename T>
using remove_refptr_t = typename std::remove_pointer<remove_ref_t<T>>::type;

template<typename T>
using is_function_t = typename std::is_function<remove_refptr_t<T>>::type;

// We can't use std::conditional because it (apparently) must determine
// the types of both arms of the condition, so we do it directly.

// Non-objects are callable only if they are functions.

template<bool isObject, typename T>
struct is_callable_impl : public is_function_t<T> {};

// Objects are callable if they have an operator().  We use a method check
// to find out.

template<typename T>
struct is_callable_impl<true, T> {
private:
    struct Fallback { void operator()(); };
    struct Derived : T, Fallback { };

    template<typename U, U> struct Check;

    template<typename>
    static std::true_type test(...);

    template<typename C>
    static std::false_type test(Check<void (Fallback::*)(), &C::operator()>*);

public:
    typedef decltype(test<Derived>(nullptr)) type;
};


// Now we have our final version of is_callable_t.  Again, we have to take
// care with references because std::is_class says "No" if we give it a
// reference to a class.

template<typename T>
using is_callable_t = 
    typename is_callable_impl<std::is_class<remove_ref_t<T>>::value,
                              remove_ref_t<T> >::type;

But in the end, for my application, I really wanted to just know whether you could say f() (i.e., call it with no arguments), so I instead went with something much simpler.

template <typename T>
constexpr bool noarg_callable_impl(
    typename std::enable_if<bool(sizeof((std::declval<T>()(),0)))>::type*)
{
    return true;
}

template<typename T>
constexpr bool noarg_callable_impl(...)
{
    return false;
}

template<typename T>
constexpr bool is_noarg_callable()
{
    return noarg_callable_impl<T>(nullptr);
}

In fact, I went even further. I knew the function was supposed to return an int, so rather than just check that I could call it, I checked the return type, too, by changing the enable_if to:

    typename std::enable_if<std::is_convertible<decltype(std::declval<T>()()),
                                                int>::value>::type*)

Hope this helps someone!

share|improve this answer

Here is a possible solution using C++11 that works without requiring to know the signature of the call operator for functors, but only as long the functor does not have more than one overload of operator ():

#include <type_traits>

template<typename T, typename = void>
struct is_callable : std::is_function<T> { };

template<typename T>
struct is_callable<T, typename std::enable_if<
    std::is_same<decltype(void(&T::operator())), void>::value
    >::type> : std::true_type { };

This is how you would use it:

struct C
{
    void operator () () { }
};

struct NC { };

struct D
{
    void operator () () { }
    void operator () (int) { }
};

int main()
{
    static_assert(is_callable<C>::value, "Error");
    static_assert(is_callable<void()>::value, "Error");

    auto l = [] () { };
    static_assert(is_callable<decltype(l)>::value, "Error");

    // Fires! (no operator())
    static_assert(is_callable<NC>::value, "Error");

    // Fires! (several overloads of operator ())
    static_assert(is_callable<D>::value, "Error");
}

Here is a live example.

share|improve this answer
    
Hum... The limitation on overload operators is really restricting, but your solution is very compact. – Antoine Mar 14 '13 at 9:36

Note: These assume that the default constructor is valid for the type your checking. Not sure offhand how to get around that.

The following seems to work if it's callable with 0 arguments. Is there something in is_function's implementation that might help to extend this to 1 or more argument callables?:

template <typename T>
struct is_callable {
    // Types "yes" and "no" are guaranteed to have different sizes,
    // specifically sizeof(yes) == 1 and sizeof(no) == 2.
    typedef char yes[1];
    typedef char no[2];

    template <typename C>
    static yes& test(decltype(C()())*);

    template <typename>
    static no& test(...);

    // If the "sizeof" the result of calling test<T>(0) would be equal to the     sizeof(yes),
    // the first overload worked and T has a nested type named foobar.
    static const bool value = sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes);
};   

If you know the type of the argument (even if it's a template parameter), the following would work for 1 argument, and I imagine one could extend pretty easily from there:

template <typename T, typename T2>
struct is_callable_1 {
    // Types "yes" and "no" are guaranteed to have different sizes,
    // specifically sizeof(yes) == 1 and sizeof(no) == 2.
    typedef char yes[1];
    typedef char no[2];

    template <typename C>
    static yes& test(decltype(C()(T2()))*);

    template <typename, typename>
    static no& test(...);

    // If the "sizeof" the result of calling test<T>(0) would be equal to the     sizeof(yes),
    // the first overload worked and T has a nested type named foobar.
    static const bool value = sizeof(test<T>(0)) == sizeof(yes);
};

Edit here is a modification that handles the case where default constructor isn't available.

share|improve this answer
1  
Re These assume that the default constructor is valid for the type your checking. Not sure offhand how to get around that. Take a look at std::declval. – jrok Mar 13 '13 at 21:28
    
@jrok Thanks, I hadn't seen that one yet. in the pastebin I attached, I just used a helper struct that had the necessary conversion operator defined, but I supposed I could replace it with declval. – EHuhtala Mar 13 '13 at 22:17

There are several other answers already, of course, and they are useful, but none of them seem to cover every use case AFAICT. Borrowing from those answers and this possible implementation of std::is_function, I created a version that covers every possible use case of which I could think. It's kind of lengthy, but very feature complete (Demo).

template<typename T, typename U = void>
struct is_callable
{
    static bool const constexpr value = std::conditional_t<
        std::is_class<std::remove_reference_t<T>>::value,
        is_callable<std::remove_reference_t<T>, int>, std::false_type>::value;
};

template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...), U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(*)(Args...), U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(&)(Args...), U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......), U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(*)(Args......), U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(&)(Args......), U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)const, U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)volatile, U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)const volatile, U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)const, U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)volatile, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)const volatile, U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)&, U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)const&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)volatile&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)const volatile&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)&, U> : std::true_type {};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)const&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)volatile&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)const volatile&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)&&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)const&&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)volatile&&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args...)const volatile&&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)&&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)const&&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)volatile&&, U> : std::true_type{};
template<typename T, typename U, typename ...Args>
struct is_callable<T(Args......)const volatile&&, U> : std::true_type{};

template<typename T>
struct is_callable<T, int>
{
private:
    using YesType = char(&)[1];
    using NoType = char(&)[2];

    struct Fallback { void operator()(); };

    struct Derived : T, Fallback {};

    template<typename U, U>
    struct Check;

    template<typename>
    static YesType Test(...);

    template<typename C>
    static NoType Test(Check<void (Fallback::*)(), &C::operator()>*);

public:
    static bool const constexpr value = sizeof(Test<Derived>(0)) == sizeof(YesType);
};

This works correctly with non-class types (returns false, of course), function types (<T()>), function pointer types, function reference types, functor class types, bind expressions, lambda types, etc. This works correctly even if the class constructor is private and/or non-defaulted, and even if operator() is overloaded. This returns false for member function pointers by design because they are not callable, but you can use bind to create a callable expression.

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Note: Visual Studio 2015 seems to choke on the "variadic function" overloads ("Args......"), and I'll confess I'm not entirely sure what that means or why it has that syntax. – monkey_05_06 Mar 4 at 2:47
    
Actually, I did some further testing, and I think I understand. If a function such as template<typename ...Args> void bar(Args &&...args, ...); were defined (although why you would mix a variadic function template with the unsafe variadic ... is beyond me!), then is_callable<decltype(bar<>)> will refer to the Args...... overload. Because the Args parameter pack may be empty, you can't type Args..., ... as the parameter list, and if it isn't empty then it will automatically insert the necessary comma for you (except, apparently, in Visual Studio 2015). – monkey_05_06 Mar 4 at 3:20

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