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var x = String.fromCharCode(65);

console.log(x);  //returns "A"

It accepts an integer and returns corresponding character (string), but that character's code is exactly equal to the input!

What happens under the hood here? Does it really just returns what it accepted? or is there any additional logic?

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You can have a look at the specification: es5.github.com/#x15.5.3.2. –  Felix Kling Mar 13 '13 at 19:38
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3 Answers

have a look @ spidermonkey source code

fromCharCode is defined in jsstr.cpp

it uses a unitStringTable for the mapping. The table is defined via preprocessor directives...

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I believe it just maintains a dictionary of ASCII codes and return character {value} for input integer{key}

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fromCharCode is used to convert a Unicode number into a character. Unicode 65 is character A. So String.fromCharCode(65) returns A.

What happens under the hood here?

The implementation may be HashMap with key-value pair, where Unicode value is mapped to corresponding character or it may be switch statement which takes Unicode and returns character.

Pseudocode of implementation using switch:

function fromCharCode(*args)
{
   return args.map(unicodeToChar).join('')
}

function unicodeTochar(unicode)
{
   switch(unicode)
   {
      //something

      case 65:
        return 'A'
      case 66:
        return 'B'

     //something
   }
}
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Thanks! I know what it does! I am interested about how it's implemented... (in JS interpreter) –  DrStrangeLove Mar 13 '13 at 19:23
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