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I have a problem but can't seem to find anyone else that has tried to do a similar task. I have a grid of numbers in an int array grid[][]

2 5 1 0 8 0 8
2 1 0 9 7 2 4
3 6 2 3 4 9 7
3 3 3 4 7 8 9
3 3 1 2 3 1 4
9 7 4 1 2 3 4

I need a simple algorithm to find where there is the most numbers connected by only going up, down, left and right. So in the example above it would find the 3 at index [2][0].

I know the problem could be solved by simply doing if statement and loop after loop but that would be very repetitive but was wondering if there is an easier way of doing this?

Any help is appreciated, this is for a game I am creating. Thank you :)

EDIT: to help clear this problem up.

2 5 1 0 8 0 8
2 1 0 9 7 2 4
3 6 2 3 4 9 7
3 3 3 4 7 8 9
3 3 1 2 3 1 4
9 7 4 1 2 3 4

the method would return 0,2 as the answer because it would find that

3
3 3 3
3 3

has the most adjacent numbers

another example,

2 5 1 0 8 0 8
2 1 0 9 7 2 4
3 3 3 3 4 6 7
1 0 3 4 7 4 9
3 3 3 2 3 1 6
9 7 4 1 8 4 6

the full find would be

3 3 3 3
    3
3 3 3

Thanks for all the answers so far, Depth first search looks interesting but can only find information on tree style searches so far.

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closed as not constructive by Brian Hoover, Randy, Andrew, user7116, Graviton Mar 14 '13 at 3:57

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4  
what dos 'the most numbers connected' mean? –  Randy Mar 13 '13 at 19:22
    
Try flood fill, removing each visited entry. Trivial recursive implementation without stack size optimizations should do. –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 13 '13 at 19:22
1  
What does "most numbers connected"? Do you mean the cell that has the highest sum of 4-adjacent cells? –  Ted Hopp Mar 13 '13 at 19:22
1  
So...how would you approach it with the if statement and loop? Do you have the code that you've tried? –  Makoto Mar 13 '13 at 19:23
1  
Why 3 in this example? I don't understand this. –  Maroun Maroun Mar 13 '13 at 19:23

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe something like this will work with small tweaks. I have not run it myself, but the concept should be clear. Can also be optimized since the same spaces may be evaluated multiple times.

public class FindConsecutiveNumbersInGrid {

public static int[][] grid = new int[][]{
    {2, 5, 1, 0, 8, 0, 8},
    {2, 1, 0, 9, 7, 2, 4},
    {3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 6, 7},
    {1, 0, 3, 4, 7, 4, 9},
    {3, 3, 3, 2, 3, 1, 6},
    {9, 7, 4, 1, 8, 4, 6}
};

public static void main(String[] args) {
    int maxFound = 0;
    int[] maxFoundPos = new int[2];
    for (int i = 0; i < grid.length; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < grid[0].length; j++) {
            boolean[][] foundGrid = new boolean[grid.length][grid[0].length];
            findConsecutive(i, j, foundGrid);
            int found = getFound(foundGrid);
            if (found > maxFound) {
                maxFound = found;
                maxFoundPos[0] = i;
                maxFoundPos[1] = j;
            }
        }
    }
    System.out.println(maxFoundPos[0] + " " + maxFoundPos[1]);
}

public static void findConsecutive(int i, int j, boolean[][] foundGrid) {
    foundGrid[i][j] = true;
    if (i < grid.length - 1 && grid[i][j] == grid[i+1][j] && !foundGrid[i+1][j]) {
        findConsecutive(i+1, j, foundGrid);
    }
    if (i > 0 && grid[i][j] == grid[i-1][j] && !foundGrid[i-1][j]) {
        findConsecutive(i-1, j, foundGrid);
    }
    if (j < grid[i].length - 1 && grid[i][j] == grid[i][j+1] && !foundGrid[i][j+1]) {
        findConsecutive(i, j+1, foundGrid);
    }
    if (j > 0 && grid[i][j] == grid[i][j-1] && !foundGrid[i][j-1]) {
        findConsecutive(i, j-1, foundGrid);
    }
}

public static int getFound(boolean[][] foundGrid) {
    int found = 0;
    for (boolean[] foundRow : foundGrid) {
        for (boolean foundSpace : foundRow) {
            if (foundSpace) found++;
        }
    }
    return found;
}

}

This prints correctly "2 0".

share|improve this answer
    
Just implemented this and doesn't work fully. seems to only look down? - sorry didn't see your edit. Thanks for the try though! –  mattxo Mar 13 '13 at 20:11
    
Will try to implement it when I got the time, if it has not been answered yet. –  ghdalum Mar 13 '13 at 20:14
    
The reason it did not work was some syntax errors. I have updated it to work, but it is still buggy since it still find the same space twice. You have to remember found spaces and not count them twice. –  ghdalum Mar 13 '13 at 20:42
    
This is awesome, thank you so much! very simple and clean code. This is very close but isn't quite correct like you said. –  mattxo Mar 13 '13 at 20:51
    
Well, we can't do it all for you ;) –  ghdalum Mar 13 '13 at 20:55

in fact,you want to find all connected components. BFS and DFS are famous algorithm about this.and for this problem you can use DFS.so you assume for each number you have a vertex.and this vertex connected by only going up, down, left and right that their numbers are equal.repeat DFS until all vertex will mark.now find a component which it has a maximum number in this graph.

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If you just want the largest flood-fillable area, then you can use a standard flood-fill algorithm, counting the number of nodes you fill, while filling them with a value which indicates that they should not be visited again. This will be O(n2) for a n x n array, which should be optimal.

If you want the longest sequence, as opposed to the largest area, then you would have to search for the longest Hamiltonian path within each flood-fill area. Unfortunately, you're out of luck, according to Hamilton Paths in Grid Graphs (1982) by Alon Itai, Christos H. Papadimitriou, and Jayme Luiz Szwarcfiter. I couldn't find a non-paywall version, but the abstract seems clear enough. (Of course, the fact that a problem is NP-complete doesn't mean that its unsolvable. Maybe your N is small enough to make it practical.)

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I need a simple algorithm to find where there are the most consecutive numbers connected by going down and to the right.

A simple algorithm is to loop through the rows and columns, looking for the longest sequence down and to the right.

Since you only want the first occurrence, you don't have to look left or up.

You can break the loops when you get to indices that are less than the longest string found. In other words, once you find a string of 3 characters, you don't have to loop through the last two columns and last two rows.

However, it's almost as quick, and much easier, to loop through the entire matrix.

In your example, you'll find two strings of 3 threes, one at (2,0) and one at (3,0). You would just take the first answer as your final answer.

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Thank you for replying but this wouldnt find the best answer because it would need to look left and up as in example 2 in the edit i put above. Thanks for your help and sorry my comment explained the problem wrong. –  mattxo Mar 13 '13 at 19:51

You can formulate this as a dynamic programming problem

Calculate the number of adjacent paths that are ascending path[i][j] = 1 for all i,j

for i=0;i<n 
  for j=0;j<n
     for dirx, diry in [(1,0),(0,1) ... etc ... ]
        if arr[i+dirx][j+diry] = arr[i][j] + 1
           path[i+dirx][j+diry] += path[i][j] 

The answer will be max(path[i][j]) for all i,j.

Or recursively, if you prefer

   for i,j<n
       go(i,j)

   def go(i,j)
        if path[i][j]>0 return path[i][j]
        ret = 1;
        for dirx, diry in [(1,0),(0,1) ... etc ... ]

            if arr[i+dirx][j+diry] = arr[i][j] + 1
               ret = max(ret, go(i+dirx,j+diry))

        return ret
share|improve this answer
    
not sure how to implement for dirx, diry in ..., any idea how this could be done in java? it seems you know how to solve it :) - is that python? i am not very skilled with python :( –  mattxo Mar 13 '13 at 19:49
    
it's just pseudocode - dirx diry is just the directions in a coordinate system [0,1],[-1,0]... etc. In java you could iterate over a 2d array like `int[][] = new int[4][2]{ [0,1] ....} –  dfb Mar 13 '13 at 19:51
    
Ahhh so in Java it would be a for loop within a for loop. Thank you, I will try implement it now. –  mattxo Mar 13 '13 at 19:54

First find a non-visited cell, and start recursion. disclaimer: This is not java, it's pseudo C without most declarations and headers. C is anyway much easier to convert to java... Use a global or a class member for the count if necessary.

To make things easier, surround your N*N array by guards.

    // with -1 -1 -1 -1 
    //      -1  x  x -1
    //      -1 -1 -1 -1

for (i=N+2;i<(N+2)*(N+1);i++) { // exact starting and ending locations are disclosed
  if (k=array[i]!=-1) {
      j=1;
      flood_fill(array,i,k,&j);
      if (j>max) { max=j; max_number=k; }
  }
}

#define UP -(N+2)
#define DOWN (N+2)
#define LEFT -1
#define RIGHT 1

int flood_fill(int *array, int position, int value_to_compare, int *count)
{
    // for each direction UP,DOWN,RIGHT,LEFT 
    static const int directions[4]={UP,DOWN,RIGHT,LEFT];
    int t;
    for (t=0;t<4;t++)
    if (array[position + directions[t]]==value_to_compare) {
        array[position + directions[t]] = -1;
        *count+=1;
        flood_fill(array, position+directions[t], value_to_compare, count);
    }
}
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