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I'm trying to understand why the following program gives the output that it does. I know it has something to do with references and values but I neither know the terminology nor do I know where to go to learn more.

        for (int x = 0; x < 2; x++)
        {
            int y = x;
            new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
                {
                    Thread.Sleep(100);
                    Console.WriteLine("Thread sees x = {0}, y = {1}", x, y);
                })).Start();
        }
        Thread.Sleep(1000);

Output:

Thread sees x = 2, y = 0
Thread sees x = 2, y = 1

A reference explaining this sort of thing would be very much appreciated.

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marked as duplicate by Servy, AD7six, dreamlax, Steven Penny, phs Mar 14 '13 at 2:23

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
blackwasp.co.uk/CSharpClosures.aspx –  Oded Mar 13 '13 at 19:47

3 Answers 3

NOTE: This is not actually the full story, and I probably got something wrong, but the idea still stands.

This happens because of closures.

Closures happen in for loops (and used to happen in foreach loops, but that was changed in C# 5). What gets compiled is something like this:

int x = 0;
while (x < 2)
        {
            int y = x;
            new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
                {
                    Thread.Sleep(100);
                    Console.WriteLine("Thread sees x = {0}, y = {1}", x, y);
                })).Start();
            x++;
        }
        Thread.Sleep(1000);

As x exists outside the scope of the for loop, the lambda does not take in. So it's still x. However, as y's scope ends outside the for loop, the lambda HAS to keep the variable, it can't just get it later, when it runs, as it'd be gone by then. So in fact, the lambda is something like this at runtime:

First loop run:

() => Thread.Sleep(100); Console.WriteLine("Thread sees x = {0}, y = {1}, x, 0);

Second loop run:

() => Thread.Sleep(100); Console.WriteLine("Thread sees x = {0}, y = {1}, x, 1);

And by the time the lambda actually runs, x is already 2, and as it didn't take it in, it reads it as 2.

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You're passing an anonymous method / lambda to the constructor of the ThreadStart object. The compiler creates a class to contain this anonymous method, and elevates x and y from being local variables in the method to class variables in this compiler-created class. That's why it is able to access the values of those variables.

See this MSDN article: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0yw3tz5k(v=vs.80).aspx

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This is how closure works in C# 4.0 and older. The variable x is more intuitive in C# 5.0 (indeed for foreach, not for loops as pointed out).

Closure captures the same variable each iteration. So you end up with the last value.

        List<Action> actions = new List<Action>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            Action anonymousFunction = () => Console.WriteLine(i);                
            actions.Add(anonymousFunction);
        }
        foreach (var action in actions)
        {
            action();//prints out the last value every time
        }

However you can change the behavior by copying a new value.

        List<Action> actions = new List<Action>();
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            int copyOfOriginalValue = i;
            Action anonymousFunction = () => Console.WriteLine(copyOfOriginalValue);                
            actions.Add(anonymousFunction);
        }
        foreach (var action in actions)
        {
            action();//prints out unique values
        }
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2  
Only in foreachs, still works the same as C# 4 for for loops. –  It'sNotALie. Mar 13 '13 at 19:47
    
Again, for whoever keeps downvoting me, please explain why –  P.Brian.Mackey Mar 13 '13 at 19:55
1  
@P.Brian.Mackey 1) The answer was wrong, and even now, is rather misleading, 2) There wasn't "no comment". There was in fact a comment explaining an important error with your post 3) closure semantics never changed at all in C# 5.0 over any previous version, all that changed is the scope of the loop variable in a foreach loop. As the OP's code has none of those, it's not relevant here. 4) You never actually do explain what a closure means/does, all you do is provide a code snippet that demonstrates the behavior, which is what the OP has in his code snippet. He wants it explained. –  Servy Mar 13 '13 at 19:58
    
@Servy - There is nothing wrong with my answer. You keep attacking my questions and answers and I don't appreciate it. You need to stop. You downvote my answers while they are still being actively written. –  P.Brian.Mackey Mar 13 '13 at 19:59
1  
I don't think a crucial failure in an answer is pedantry... –  It'sNotALie. Mar 13 '13 at 20:30

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