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>>> import numpy as np
>>> x = np.eye(3)
>>> x[1, 2] = .5
>>> x
array([[ 1. ,  0. ,  0. ],
       [ 0. ,  1. ,  0.5],
       [ 0. ,  0. ,  1. ]])
>>> 0 < x.any() < 1
False
>>> 

I would like to check if numpy array contains any value between 0 and 1.
I read 0 < x.any() < 1 as 'if there is any element with size greater then 0 and less then 1, return true', but that's obviously not the case.

How can I do arithmetic comparison on numpy array?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
>>> np.any((0 < x) & (x < 1))
True

What x.any() actually does: it's the same as np.any(x), meaning it returns True if any elements in x are nonzero. So your comparison is 0 < True < 1, which is false because in python 2 0 < True is true, but True < 1 is not, since True == 1.

In this approach, by contrast, we make boolean arrays of whether the comparison is true for each element, and then check if any element of that array is true:

>>> 0 < x
array([[ True, False, False],
       [False,  True,  True],
       [False, False,  True]], dtype=bool)
>>> x < 1
array([[False,  True,  True],
       [ True, False,  True],
       [ True,  True, False]], dtype=bool)
>>> (0 < x) & (x < 1)
array([[False, False, False],
       [False, False,  True],
       [False, False, False]], dtype=bool)

You have to do the explicit &, because unfortunately numpy doesn't (and I think can't) work with python's built-in chaining of comparison operators.

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I get ValueError: The truth value of an array with more than one element is ambiguous. Use a.any() or a.all() using your code. –  user2136786 Mar 13 '13 at 19:55
    
Yeah, sorry, I was faking it initially (always forget that operator chaining doesn't work in numpy). Updated, with explanations. –  Dougal Mar 13 '13 at 19:55
    
The reason comparison chaining doesn't (and can't) work with numpy arrays is that python interprets a<b<c as a<b and b<c, while with numpy arrays, we need it to be interpreted as a<b & b<c –  shx2 Mar 13 '13 at 20:03
    
@shx2 It would technically be possible (I think) if numpy chose to interpret a and b like a & b. It doesn't, though, and that's probably a good choice overall – just one I often forget about. :) –  Dougal Mar 13 '13 at 20:26
    
You can't overload the boolean and and or operators in python. It's not numpy's choice. –  shx2 Mar 13 '13 at 20:32

Your code first tests x.any(), which evaluates to True, as x includes a nonzero value. It then tests 0 < True (=1) < 1, which is False. Do:

((0 < x) & (x < 1)).any()
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