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I have a loop

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    outPut.innerHTML += "<div id='file" + i + "'>" + i + "</div>";
    $('#file' + i).on('click', function(event) {
        alert('User clicked on ' + i);
    }).css('cursor', 'pointer');
}

and only last element gets event attached. What is the problem?

See the test here http://jsfiddle.net/haF7Y/

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2  
3  
OMG, dont do that... use a class and/or data attribute and bind once... Why bind n different functions that do the same thing!? –  prodigitalson Mar 13 '13 at 20:28
2  
If you're wondering why you've been downvoted, it's apparently due to the percieved lack of research. –  Jan Dvorak Mar 13 '13 at 20:29
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marked as duplicate by DCoder, Matt, Jan Dvorak, ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ, zzzzBov Mar 13 '13 at 20:47

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is what you are missing - event listeners are asynchronous in nature! So always use a closure function inside the loop when performing such task as this! See below -

for (i = 0; i <10; i++){
  (function(i){
    outPut.innerHTML +="<div id='file"+ i + "'>" + i+ "</div>";
    $('#file' + i).on('click', function(event) {
      alert('User clicked on ' + i);
    }).css('cursor', 'pointer');
  }(i))
}
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Remove the click event from the for loop.

$(document).on('click', '[id^=file]', function(e){
    alert('user clicked on '+ this.id.split('file')[1]);
});
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work with jquery objects like this (and create a closure)

var jOutPut = $('div:first');

var create = function(i) {
    var j = $('<div/>')
        .attr('id', 'file' + i)
        .css('cursor', 'pointer')
        .html(i)
        .click(function(event){
            alert('User clicked on ' + i);
        });

    jOutPut.append(j);
}

for(i=0;i<10;i++) {
    create(i);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Matt try again... sorry –  silly Mar 13 '13 at 20:34
    
@Matt and @JanDvorak ... never post untested code ... now! –  silly Mar 13 '13 at 20:38
    
If I post untested code to demonstrate an algorithm, I mark it as such: "Something along the lines of", "here's a sketch of the solution"... Note that this won't work when fixing someone's code, and it's always a good idea to debug later on :-) –  Jan Dvorak Mar 13 '13 at 20:46
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This is how your code should be written:

for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    var newEl = $("<div class='file' data-index='"+i+"'>" + i + "</div>").css('cursor', 'pointer');
    outPut.append(newEl);
}

$('.file').click(function(event) {
        alert('User clicked on ' + $(this).attr('data-index'));
});

And here is a fiddle to show it works: http://jsfiddle.net/qX8RQ/

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Revised, sorry I missed the "i". Whats up with all the damn downvotes? You should appreciate the help. –  zachzurn Mar 13 '13 at 20:38
1  
Not sure index() is the best approach. Indexing within some collection would likely be better. –  Jan Dvorak Mar 13 '13 at 20:38
    
The downvotes typically signify the answer is factually incorrect or otherwise harmful. You didn't fix the issue. Hence, factually incorrect. –  Jan Dvorak Mar 13 '13 at 20:39
    
There are numerous ways to show the index, if you want a more defined index use a "data-index" or "data-___" to store information. –  zachzurn Mar 13 '13 at 20:39
    
data-index is innovative. +1 for creativity :-) –  Jan Dvorak Mar 13 '13 at 20:39
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