Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This method is taking over 7 seconds with 50 markets and 2,500 flows (~250,000 iterations). Why so slow?

def matrix
  [:origin, :destination].collect do |location|
    markets.collect do |market|
      network.flows.collect { |flow| flow[location] == market ? 1 : 0 }
    end
  end.flatten
end

I know that the slowness comes from the comparison of one market to another market based on benchmarks that I've run.

Here are the relevant parts of the class that's being compared.

module FreightFlow
  class Market
    include ActiveAttr::Model

    attribute :coordinates

    def ==(value)
      coordinates == value.coordinates
    end

  end
end

What's the best way to make this faster?

share|improve this question
1  
I'm afraid that, without more knowledge about the objects, no one can tell. You can try gradually simplifying the code and see what part exactly takes most of the time. –  Mladen Jablanović Mar 13 '13 at 20:40
    
What are markets? flows? what is network? an object that has flows? is flows an array? or it it a hash? what is a location? provide more explaination of what your algorithm is trying to do, and there is probably a faster way. Just looking at this code though I cant say exactly. There are reasons why this might be slow, but that might not be helpful in solving your problem –  loosecannon Mar 13 '13 at 20:41
    
My guess is that it's the object comparison at flow[location] == market. Overriding == cuts the time by 66%, but it stil seems slow. –  barelyknown Mar 13 '13 at 20:44
    
markets is an array of Market instances (simple ruby object). flows is an array of Flow instances (also simple ruby object). This method creates the array matrix for a linear programming problem. –  barelyknown Mar 13 '13 at 20:46
add comment

3 Answers 3

You are constructing 100 intermediate collections (2*50) comprising of a total of 250,000 (2*50*2500) elements, and then flattening it at the end. I would try constructing the whole data structure in one pass. Make sure that markets and network.flows are stored in a hash or set. Maybe something like:

def matrix
  network.flows.collect do |flow|
    (markets.h­as_key? flow[:origin] or 
     marke­ts.has_key­? flow[:destination]) ? 1 : 0
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
I though that it may be the flatten issue too, but refactoring that doesn't change the the time. The == change made a big impact, but I suspect that there's something else wrong too. –  barelyknown Mar 13 '13 at 20:51
1  
@barelyknown if your comparison is the bottleneck, how about memoizing the results? Are there duplicate flow objects? –  dbyrne Mar 13 '13 at 21:34
    
Good thinking regarding memoizing the result. The best solution that I found was inspired by that. I'll post as an answer. –  barelyknown Mar 14 '13 at 1:25
add comment

This is a simple thing but it can help...

In your innermost loop you're doing:

network.flows.collect { |flow| flow[location] == market ? 1 : 0 }

Instead of using the ternary statement to convert to 1 or 0, use true and false Booleans instead:

network.flows.collect { |flow| flow[location] == market }

This isn't a big difference in speed, but over the course of that many nested loops it adds up.

In addition, it allows you to simplify your tests using the matrix being generated. Instead of having to compare to 1 or 0, you can simplify your conditional tests to if flow[location], if !flow[location] or unless flow[location], again speeding up your application a little bit for each test. If those are deeply nested in loops, which is very likely, that little bit can add up again.

Something that is important to do, when speed is important, is use Ruby's Benchmark class to test various ways of doing the same task. Then, instead of guessing, you KNOW what works. You'll find lots of questions on Stack Overflow where I've supplied an answer that consists of a benchmark showing the speed differences between various ways of doing something. Sometimes the differences are very big. For instance:

require 'benchmark'

puts `ruby -v`

def test1()
  true
end

def test2(p1)
  true
end

def test3(p1, p2)
  true
end

N = 10_000_000
Benchmark.bm(5) do |b|
  b.report('?:') { N.times { (1 == 1) ? 1 : 0 } }
  b.report('==') { N.times { (1 == 1) } }
  b.report('if') {
    N.times {
      if (1 == 1)
        1
      else
        0
      end
    }
  }
end

Benchmark.bm(5) do |b|
  b.report('test1') { N.times { test1() } }
  b.report('test2') { N.times { test2('foo') } }
  b.report('test3') { N.times { test3('foo', 'bar') } }
  b.report('test4') { N.times { true } }
end

And the results:

ruby 1.9.3p392 (2013-02-22 revision 39386) [x86_64-darwin10.8.0]
            user     system      total        real
?:      1.880000   0.000000   1.880000 (  1.878676)
==      1.780000   0.000000   1.780000 (  1.785718)
if      1.920000   0.000000   1.920000 (  1.914225)
            user     system      total        real
test1   2.760000   0.000000   2.760000 (  2.760861)
test2   4.800000   0.000000   4.800000 (  4.808184)
test3   6.920000   0.000000   6.920000 (  6.915318)
test4   1.640000   0.000000   1.640000 (  1.637506)

ruby 2.0.0p0 (2013-02-24 revision 39474) [x86_64-darwin10.8.0]
            user     system      total        real
?:      2.280000   0.000000   2.280000 (  2.285408)
==      2.090000   0.010000   2.100000 (  2.087504)
if      2.350000   0.000000   2.350000 (  2.363972)
            user     system      total        real
test1   2.900000   0.010000   2.910000 (  2.899922)
test2   7.070000   0.010000   7.080000 (  7.092513)
test3  11.010000   0.030000  11.040000 ( 11.033432)
test4   1.660000   0.000000   1.660000 (  1.667247)

There are two different sets of tests. The first is looking to see what the differences are with simple conditional tests vs. using == without a ternary to get just the Booleans. The second is to test the effect of calling a method, a method with a single parameter, and with two parameters, vs. "inline-code" to find out the cost of the setup and tear-down when calling a method.

Modern C compilers do some amazing things when they analyze the code prior to emitting the assembly language to be compiled. We can fine-tune them to write for size or speed. When we go for speed, the program grows as the compiler looks for loops it can unroll and places it can "inline" code, to avoid making the CPU jump around and throwing away stuff that's in the cache.

Ruby is much higher up the language chain, but some of the same ideas still apply. We can write in a very DRY manner, and avoid repetition and use methods and classes to abstract our data, but the cost is reduced processing speed. The answer is to write your code intelligently and don't waste CPU time and unroll/inline where necessary to gain speed and other times be DRY to make your code more maintainable.

It's all a balancing act, and there's a time for writing both ways.

share|improve this answer
    
I actually need the 1s and 0s because this array is the input to a linear programming problem. –  barelyknown Mar 13 '13 at 21:05
    
Then the final step would be to walk through the entire matrix and convert them. At least that's how I'd do it. –  the Tin Man Mar 13 '13 at 21:14
    
I'm using Benchmark ;) That's how I know what helps and what doesn't. The problem is definitely with the comparison. I'll post the code above. –  barelyknown Mar 13 '13 at 21:18
    
Looking at the code you added, if it was me, and I wanted the greatest speed I could get, I wouldn't call a method to compare two values. That is costly in itself, about 7x slower for Ruby 2.0 if you compare test2 and test4 just to set up the method call. See the added benchmarks in my answer. –  the Tin Man Mar 13 '13 at 21:40
add comment

Memoizing the indexes of the markets within the flows was way faster than any other solution. Time reduced from ~30 seconds when the question was asked to 0.6 seconds.

First, I added a flow_index in the Network class. It stores the indexes of the flows that contain the markets.

def flow_index
  @flow_index ||= begin
    flow_index = {}
    [:origin, :destination].each do |location|
      flow_index[location] = {}
      flows.each { |flow| flow_index[location][flow[location]] = [] }
      flows.each_with_index { |flow, i| flow_index[location][flow[location]] << i }
    end
    flow_index
  end
end

Then, I refactored the matrix method to use the flow index.

def matrix
  base_row = network.flows.count.times.collect { 0 }
  [:origin, :destination].collect do |location|
    markets.collect do |market|
      row = base_row.dup
      network.flow_index[location][market].each do |i|
        row[i] = 1
      end
      row
    end
  end.flatten
end

The base_row is created with all 0s and you just replace with 1s at the locations from the flow_index for that market.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.