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I need to write a list of values to a text file. Because of Windows, when I need to write a line feed character, windows does \n\r and other systems do \n.

It occurred to me that maybe I should write to file in binary.

How to I create a list like the following example and write to file in binary?

output = ['my first line', hex_character_for_line_feed_here, 'my_second_line']

How come the following does not work?

output = ['my first line', '\x0a', 'my second line']
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open the file in binary mode open(path,"wb") –  Shmil The Cat Mar 13 '13 at 21:02
    
i get that part for sure but in python 3.3, what does the hex representation of a line feed looks like using my example above? Something like... \x0a ? –  Vini Mar 13 '13 at 21:03
    
import os os.linesep –  Shmil The Cat Mar 13 '13 at 21:07
    
I guess my question is, how do I convert anything inside of a list to its hex character representation if it isn't already, then write to file? –  Vini Mar 13 '13 at 21:19
    
'\x0a' is exactly the same character as '\n'. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 13 '13 at 21:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't. Open the file in text mode and just let Python handle the newlines for you.

When you use the open() function you can set how Python should handle newlines with the newline keyword parameter:

When writing output to the stream, if newline is None, any '\n' characters written are translated to the system default line separator, os.linesep. If newline is '' or '\n', no translation takes place. If newline is any of the other legal values, any '\n' characters written are translated to the given string.

So the default method is to write the correct line separator for your platform:

with open(outputfilename, 'w') as outputfile:
    outputfile.write('\n'.join(output))

and does the right thing; on Windows \r\n characters are saved instead of \n.

If you specifically want to write \n only and not have Python translate these for you, use newline='':

with open(outputfilename, 'w', newline='') as outputfile:
    outputfile.write('\n'.join(output))

Note that '\x0a' is exactly the same character as \n; \r is \x0d:

>>> '\x0a'
'\n'
>>> '\x0d'
'\r'
share|improve this answer
    
line feed is not the only hex character I'd like to add to this string. For some reason this does not work: output = ['my first line', '\x0a', 'my second line'] –  Vini Mar 13 '13 at 21:27
    
@Vini: Why do you need to add explicit linefeeds? They'll work just fine, btw, Python will write those to your file unchanged. '\x0a' is the same character as \n. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 13 '13 at 21:28
    
Record separators, Carriage Returns. I am basically building a string that follows a standard and gets encoded to pdf417 Bar Codes. –  Vini Mar 13 '13 at 21:30
    
@Vini: If you need to write exact line separators, set newline='' and no translation takes place. If you need them translated to platform-specific newlines, use newline=None. This is still ASCII data, so textual mode is just fine. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 13 '13 at 21:30
1  
@Vini: That is because you are opening the file with newline=None and a \r\n is written. Use newline='' instead. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 13 '13 at 21:33

Create a text file, "myTextFile" in the same directory as your Python script. Then write something like:

# wb opens the file in "Write Binary" mode
myTextFile = open("myTextFile.txt", 'wb')

output = ['my first line', '369as3', 'my_second_line']

for member in output:
    member.encode("utf-8") # Or whatever encoding you like =)
    myTextFile.write(member + "\n")

This outputs a binary text file that looks like:

my first line
369as3
my_second_line

Edit: Updated for Python 3

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This is Python 3; you need to write bytes, not strings to files when opening a file in binary mode. Your code does not work on Python 3. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 13 '13 at 21:38
    
Ah I see, the OP didn't specify the version. Edited my code to encode the string to bytes first. –  Murkantilism Mar 13 '13 at 21:47
    
Yes, he did, in the tags on the question. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 13 '13 at 21:48
    
Didn't see the tag. Still, edited my code to encode the string to bytes first. –  Murkantilism Mar 13 '13 at 22:31

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