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Hi I am currently writing a C program in UNIX to model a socket stop & wait protocol for school. I am constantly getting a segmentation error when i enter 4 arguments into the command line. if i enter more or less than 4 then i get the correct error thrown. If anyone could help it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <strings.h>

#define SERVER_PORT 6500
#define MAX_LINE 256

int
main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
        FILE *fp;
        struct hostent *hp;
        struct sockaddr_in sin, client;
        char *host;
        char ack[MAX_LINE], buf[MAX_LINE], fname[MAX_LINE];
        int s, i, rnum, drop;
        int8_t current, last = -1;
        int rval, slen, NFrames, len;

        long LenFile;
        struct timeval rectime;  //The struct timeval structure represents an elapsed time
        struct timeval zone;

        if (argc==4){
                host=argv[1];
        }
        else {
            fprintf(stderr, "usage: simplex-talk host\n");
             //fprintf(stderr, "hello");
                exit(1);
        }

        if (!hp) {
                fprintf(stderr, "simplex-talk: unknown host: %s\n", host);
                exit(1);
        }

        bzero((char *)&sin, sizeof(sin));
        sin.sin_family = AF_INET;
        bcopy(hp->h_addr, (char *)&sin.sin_addr, hp->h_length);
        sin.sin_port=htons(SERVER_PORT);

        if((s=socket(PF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM,0)) < 0){
                 perror("simplex-talk; socket");
                 exit(1);
        }

        // create file request
        sprintf(buf, "%s\0", argv[3]);

        if ((rval=sendto(s,buf,sizeof(buf),0,(struct sockaddr *)&client,sizeof(client)))< 0) {
printf("sjkdfj");
perror("writing on datagram socket");
        }
        system("date");
        printf("Sent request for file %s at time = %ld %ld\n", argv[3], rectime.tv_sec, rectime.tv_usec);

        bzero(ack,sizeof(ack));
        slen = sizeof(client);

    buf[MAX_LINE-1] = '\0';
    len = strlen(buf) + 1;
         //request to send, waiting....

        while ((rval = recvfrom(s,ack,sizeof(ack),0,(struct sockaddr *)&client,&slen))<0){
                perror("receiver recvfrom");
                printf(stderr, "hhhhhhhh");
}
          //get time
        if (gettimeofday(&rectime, &zone) < 0) {
                perror("getting time");
                exit(1);
        }
        if(ack[0] == '0'){
                printf("Received file not found, time = %ld %ld, File = \"%s\"\n", rectime.tv_sec, rectime.tv_usec, fname);
        }
        if(ack[0] == '1') {
                char ch[MAX_LINE];
                int i, j;
                for(i=2, j=0; ack[i] != ' '; i++, j++){
                        ch[j] = ack[i];
                }
                ch[i++] = '\0';
                LenFile=atoi(ch);
                for(j=0; ack[i] && ack[i] != '.'; i++, j++){
                        fname[j] = ack[i];
                }
                fname[i++] = '\0';
                strcat(fname, "client.txt");
                NFrames = LenFile / MAX_LINE + (LenFile % MAX_LINE == 0 ? 0:1);
                printf("Received, ack sent, time = %ld %ld\nfname = \"%s\"\n", LenFile = "%d\n", rectime.tv_sec, rectime.tv_usec, fname, LenFile);

                //file I/O (reads)
                fp=fopen(fname, "w");
                if(fp==NULL){
                        perror("Opening File for Writing");
                        exit(1);
                }
                printf("Opening File %s for writing\n", fname);
                drop = 0;

                for(i=0; i < NFrames; ){
                        bzero(ack,sizeof(ack));
                        while ((rval = recvfrom(s,ack,sizeof(ack),0,(struct sockaddr *)&client,&slen))<0){
                                perror("receiver recvfrom");
                        }
 //get time
                        if (gettimeofday(&rectime, &zone) < 0) {
                                perror("getting time");
                                exit(1);
                        }
                        current = ack[0];
                        if(current == last) {
                                printf("Duplicate frame %d received\n", last);
                                continue;
                        }
                        printf("Recieved Frame #%d at time = %ld %ld\n\nContent:\n%s\n", current, rectime.tv_sec, rectime.tv_usec, ack+1);
                        fputs(ack+1, fp);

                        //creating ack
                        bzero(buf,sizeof(buf));
                        sprintf(buf, "%c%s\0", current, "ackp");

                        //25% chance of loss is to call random()
                        rnum = random();
                        if((rnum%4) != 0) {
                                // get time
                                if (gettimeofday(&rectime, &zone) < 0) {
                                        perror("getting time");
                                        exit(1);
                                }
                                if ((rval=sendto(s,buf,sizeof(buf),0,(struct sockaddr *)&client,sizeof(client))) < 0) {
                                perror("writing on datagram socket");
                                }else{
                                        i++;
                                        last = current;
                                        printf("Sent Received Packet ACK for Frame %d at time = %ld %ld\n", current, rectime.tv_sec, rectime.tv_usec);
                                }
                        }else{
                                drop++;
                        }
                }
                 printf("Total Number of dropped frames is %d\n", drop);
                //get time
                if (gettimeofday(&rectime, &zone) < 0) {
                        perror("getting time");
                        exit(1);
                }
                fclose(fp);
                printf("Closing file for writing at time = %ld %ld\n", rectime.tv_sec, rectime.tv_usec);
        }
        //get time
        if (gettimeofday(&rectime, &zone) < 0) {
                perror("getting time");
                exit(1);
        }
        printf("Closing Socked %d for File \"%s at time = %ld %ld\n", ntohs(client.sin_port), fname, rectime.tv_sec, rectime.tv_usec);
        close(s);
}
share|improve this question
1  
You check hp (like this: if (!hp)) but you never initialize hp to anything. It's a pointer and it points to who knows where? In other words, it's junk. And junk is unlikely to be NULL. So you continue further down and... bam! –  Nik Bougalis Mar 13 '13 at 21:10
    
Not sure what you mean. isn't hp is initialized as a struct in the code? it does return the error if the hostname is incorrect. Note that i am running this over the school's virtual machine remotely. –  Jonathan Lee Mar 13 '13 at 21:12
1  
Can you please show us a short, self-contained, compilable example? The code you have posted (a) does not compile and, (b) is cluttered with unused variables presumably unrelated to your actual problem of argument counting and variable initialization. –  pilcrow Mar 13 '13 at 21:13
1  
hahaha here ya go i did with an edit, thanks for all your help. –  Jonathan Lee Mar 13 '13 at 21:18
1  
In addition to @NikBougalis point about not initializing hp before testing it with if (!hp), there's the bit where you bcopy(hp->h_addr, ...). The test may "safely" fail because, as pointed out, hp is likely to have a random-ish non-zero value, but dereferencing that value as source and length for bcopy() is likely to create unexpected values in your sin structure, which it appears that you then completely ignore, in favor of the entirely uninitialized client structure... –  twalberg Mar 13 '13 at 21:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Your first problem is here:

bcopy(hp->h_addr, (char *)&sin.sin_addr, hp->h_length);

Where does hp point to? It's a pointer that you haven't initialized and it points to some random area in memory. Accessing some random area in memory that doesn't belong to you is bad. Don't do it.

share|improve this answer
    
ok i edited it to point to something I think. if (argc==4){ host=argv[1]; hp = gethostbyname(host); } –  Jonathan Lee Mar 13 '13 at 21:26
    
Not bad! Not great (you still don't give a sensible default value to hp but you exit if you don't set it so let's not nitpick) but not bad. So... now... tell... what happens? Don't keep us in suspense. –  Nik Bougalis Mar 13 '13 at 21:28
    
alright no segmentation error! woohoo! but not outta the ballpark yet. now im getting a datagram socket error. writing on datagram socket: Invalid argument Wed Mar 13 14:29:18 PDT 2013 sjkdfjSent request for file go at time = 140734746993392 217545979656 –  Jonathan Lee Mar 13 '13 at 21:30
    
So now, to your next problem: You never initialize client and rectime to anything either. They have space allocated for them, but that space is full of junk. Who knows what address client contains? Yet you try to send data to it. Please repeat after me: "I, Jonathan Lee, will initialize variables to contain the data I need them to contain before I use them." –  Nik Bougalis Mar 13 '13 at 21:34
    
haha thanks nik. "I, Jonathan Lee, will initialize variables to contain the data I need them to contain before I use them." part of this code has been provided by the teacher so we are supposed to build upon it. thanks for letting me know about the errors though! –  Jonathan Lee Mar 13 '13 at 21:40

One thing to note: argc contains the count of the arguments passed to your program + one for the program name. So if you are running your program with 4 arguments, argc = 5 and if (argc==4) will not be met. If that doesn't fix the issue, what is the stack of the segfault?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Blake, i do gcc client.c -o client then client (hostname) f1.txt 6400 and i get a seg fault –  Jonathan Lee Mar 13 '13 at 21:09
    
Can you run this in gdb and give the stack trace of the crash? If you do $ gdb client then run (hostname) f1.txt 6400 it should crash and you can run where to get the stack. I'm assuming there's more to your program than you pasted here, right? –  Blake Mar 13 '13 at 21:11
    
I ran it but it didn't crash: this is what I got back. you are correct there is more to the program but I didn't want to burden anyone with reading all of it haha. (gdb) run geometry f1.txt 6400 Starting program: geometry f1.txt 6400 No executable file specified. Use the "file" or "exec-file" command. (gdb) where No stack. –  Jonathan Lee Mar 13 '13 at 21:14
    
It looks like you may not be running gdb correctly. Take a look at cs.cmu.edu/~gilpin/tutorial for a quick intro to how to figure out the stack when you get a seg fault. That's definitely an essential skill for C/C++ development. Once you get the stack (and line where it is failing) you should be able to spot the error. If not, post the stack here with a more complete example. –  Blake Mar 13 '13 at 21:20

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