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I created this simple CDI bean:

import java.io.Serializable;
import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;
import javax.annotation.Resource;
import javax.faces.application.FacesMessage;
import javax.faces.bean.ViewScoped;
import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
import javax.inject.Named;


    @Named("DashboardController")
    @ViewScoped
    public class Dashboard implements Serializable
    {
    .......
    }

I removed all configuration from faces-config.xml. I created this beans.xml file into WEB-INF directory:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<beans xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee"
       xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance"
       xsi:schemaLocation="
      http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee
      http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/javaee/beans_1_0.xsd">
</beans>

When I opened the JSF page the bean cannot be found. Can you tell me what am I missing? I don't want to declare the beans into faces-config.xml.

P.S I don't know if this is important or not but this is a WAB package with CDI beans.

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3  
javax.faces.bean.ViewScoped from JSF doesn't mix with javax.inject.Named from CDI. You should use plain CDI or JSF managed bean, not both. –  Luiggi Mendoza Mar 13 '13 at 22:19
    
Have a look into ViewAccessScope from CODI as well if you plan on using CDI –  Avinash Singh Mar 13 '13 at 22:32
    
in order to rule other error possibilities out, change the scope to SessionScoped and run again. –  kostja Mar 14 '13 at 5:41

2 Answers 2

You'll need to use ViewAccessScoped instead of ViewScoped.

import java.io.Serializable;
import javax.annotation.PostConstruct;
import javax.annotation.Resource;
import javax.faces.application.FacesMessage;
import org.apache.myfaces.extensions.cdi.core.api.scope.conversation.ViewAccessScoped;
//Note the different import
import javax.faces.context.FacesContext;
import javax.inject.Named;


    @Named("dashboardController")
    @ViewAccessScoped
    public class Dashboard implements Serializable
    {
    .......
    }

You should also start the name in Named with a non-capital letter.

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1  
Yes, but as far as I know ViewAccessScoped is from the CODI framework not CDI. –  Peter Penzov Mar 14 '13 at 12:08
2  
OP is not using CODI, and you haven't even mentioned the framework in your answer. As far as any other onlooker to this question is concerned, it appears as if ViewAccessScoped is part of CDI –  kolossus Mar 15 '13 at 5:43

You might need to add the faces_config file to your META-INF folder of your WAB as described in this thread

That aside, even if the bean is found, you might still have problems with the scoping; You can't apply a JSF scope to a CDI bean. CDI's @ConversationScoped is a somewhat less than convenient alternative to JSF's @ViewScoped. The inconvenience of the scope lies in the fact that you need to inject an extra managed object and you have to actively manage the scope yourself. To use:

  1. Annotate your bean with @ConversationScoped

    @Named("DashboardController")
    @ConversationScoped
    public class Dashboard implements Serializable
     {
    
     }
    
  2. Inject the Conversation object into your bean

    @Inject
    private Conversation conversation;
    
  3. On this object, you need to call begin() and end() to start the "conversation" (a la viewscope) and "end" the conversation (like JSF does by destroying a viewscoped bean) respectively. This is a matter of design and context. At the very least, you can call conversation.begin() in a @PostConstructor. Where you end the conversation depends on your specific use case

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Thank you for the information. Can I automatically free the resources using this code: @Remove public void finishIt(){ conversation.end(); }. I want to place it at the bottom of the managed bean and let the Application server to manage the resources alone when the user closes the page. –  Peter Penzov Mar 15 '13 at 7:58
    
@PeterPenzov yes you can. In an EJB, that's the perfect place to place it –  kolossus Mar 15 '13 at 13:18
    
As @BalusC recommended here: stackoverflow.com/questions/15427217/… The new JSF 2.2 will fix this problem. I just will switch to the new version. –  Peter Penzov Mar 15 '13 at 13:21
    
@PeterPenzov that's fine. Don't think 2.2. has been officially released though. –  kolossus Mar 15 '13 at 13:35

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