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It is OK to use the standard 'true' and 'false' inside a switch statement, like so:

void handle_a_bool (bool value_to_be_handled)
{
    switch (value_to_be_handled)
    {
        case true:
        // Yay.
        break;
        case false:
        // @$#%.
        break;
    };
};

I guess what I really want to know is whether the standard 'bool' type in C++ is a constant or something else.

share|improve this question
    
what does your local friendly compiler say? – pm100 Mar 13 '13 at 23:23
1  
I compiled & ran a test program with a boolean in a switch and it seemed to work just fine. The reason I was asking about this was mainly because on a much larger project something was broken and I wondered whether it was a boolean switch statement, because the compiler was being dumb and telling me almost nothing. But since the test is fine, I guess it's a different problem. – rsethc Mar 13 '13 at 23:37
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, it is legal, but why would you do that? Just use this:

if (value_to_be_handled)
{
    // ...
}
else
{
    // ...
}

The version based on switch just makes the code harder to read and doesn't bring any additional benefit.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually you could have; if true do both if false just do false; if you drop a break with one for example. – user1944441 Mar 13 '13 at 23:23
    
@Armin: I would really dislike that. It makes it even harder to read, and it is a good programming practice to always put a break after a case:, unless you have a no-op case. It wouldn't pass code review in my team. – Andy Prowl Mar 13 '13 at 23:29
    
I am mainly looking to increase the performance of a boolean switch because I need to use several of them in a function that loops quickly. – rsethc Mar 13 '13 at 23:31
1  
@rsethc: This is called "premature optimization". Don't do that. First choose the simplest design, then measure, and if you see a bottleneck, think about optimizing it. Apart from this general principle, in this case using a switch won't bring you any benefit in terms of performance. Rather, it is likelier to introduce some overhead, depending on how the compiler translates the switch statement. – Andy Prowl Mar 13 '13 at 23:32
    
Apparently the boolean switch couldn't have been causing the problem with my project, since the test ran fine. However, I didn't think of case fall-through, which is helpful to keep in mind in case I want to further optimize something that would happen for both cases after something that would only happen for one. Thanks – rsethc Mar 13 '13 at 23:40

You may use it, but as for me it's extremely hard to read.

Why to not use just

void handle_a_bool (bool value_to_be_handled) {
    if(value_to_be_handled) {

    }
    else{
    }
};

?

share|improve this answer
    
There's a function that has several of these true/false switches and I need the function to run as quickly as possible. – rsethc Mar 13 '13 at 23:29

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