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EDIT: Based on some of my debugging and logging, I think the question boils down to why is DELETE FROM table WHERE id = x much faster than DELETE FROM table WHERE id IN (x) where x is just a single ID.

I recently tested batch-delete versus deleting each row one by one and noticed that batch-delete was much slower. The table had triggers for delete, update, and insert but I've tested with and without the triggers and each time batch-delete was slower. Can anyone shed some light on why this is the case or share tips on how I can debug this? From what I understand, I can't really reduce the number of times the trigger activates but I had originally figured that lowering the number of "delete" query would help with the performance.

I've included some information below, please let me know if I've left out anything relevant.

Deletion are done in batches of 10,000 and the code look something like :

private void batchDeletion( Collection<Long> ids ) {
  StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
  sb.append( "DELETE FROM ObjImpl WHERE id IN (:ids)" );

  Query sql = getSession().createQuery( sb.toString() );
  sql.setParameterList( "ids", ids );

  sql.executeUpdate();
}

The code to delete just a single row is basically:

SessionFactory.getCurrentSession().delete(obj);

The table has two indexes which is not used in any of the deletion. No cascade operation will occur.

Here is a sample of the EXPLAIN ANALYZE of DELETE FROM table where id IN ( 1, 2, 3 );:

Delete on table  (cost=12.82..24.68 rows=3 width=6) (actual time=0.143..0.143 rows=0 loops=1)
  ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on table  (cost=12.82..24.68 rows=3 width=6) (actual time=0.138..0.138 rows=0 loops=1)
        Recheck Cond: (id = ANY ('{1,2,3}'::bigint[]))
        ->  Bitmap Index Scan on pk_table  (cost=0.00..12.82 rows=3 width=0) (actual time=0.114..0.114 rows=0 loops=1)
              Index Cond: (id = ANY ('{1,2,3}'::bigint[]))
Total runtime: 3.926 ms

I've vacuumed and reindexed each time I reload my data for testing and my test data contains 386,660 rows.

The test is to delete all the rows and I'm not using TRUNCATE because normally there's a selection criteria but for testing purposes, I've made the criteria include all rows. With triggers enabled, deleting each row one by one took 193,616ms whereas batch-delete took 285,558ms. I then disabled the triggers and got 93,793ms for single row deletes and 181,537ms for batch-delete. The trigger goes and sums up values and updates another table - basically bookkeeping.

I've played around with lower batch sizes (100 and 1) and they all seem to perform worse.

EDIT: Turned on Hibernate logging and for single row by row deletes, it's basically doing: delete from table where id=? and the EXPLAIN ANALYZE:

Delete on table  (cost=0.00..8.31 rows=1 width=6) (actual time=0.042..0.042 rows=0 loops=1)
  ->  Index Scan using pk_table on table  (cost=0.00..8.31 rows=1 width=6) (actual time=0.037..0.037 rows=0 loops=1)
        Index Cond: (id = 3874904)
Total runtime: 0.130 ms

EDIT: Was curious if the list actually contained 10,000 ID, if Postgres would do something different: nope.

Delete on table  (cost=6842.01..138509.15 rows=9872 width=6) (actual time=17.170..17.170 rows=0 loops=1)
  ->  Bitmap Heap Scan on table  (cost=6842.01..138509.15 rows=9872 width=6) (actual time=17.160..17.160 rows=0 loops=1)
        Recheck Cond: (id = ANY ('{NUMBERS 1 THROUGH 10,000}'::bigint[]))
        ->  Bitmap Index Scan on pk_table  (cost=0.00..6839.54 rows=9872 width=0) (actual time=17.139..17.139 rows=0 loops=1)
              Index Cond: (id = ANY ('{NUMBERS 1 THROUGH 10,000}'::bigint[]))
Total runtime: 17.391 ms

EDIT: Based on the EXPLAIN ANALYZE of the above, I've retrieved some logging from the actual delete operations. Below is logging of two variation of single row by row deletes.

Here are some single deletes:

2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?
2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?
2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?
2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?
2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?
2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?
2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?
2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?
2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?
2013-03-14 13:09:25,424:delete from table where id=?

Here is the other variation of single deletes (the list is just 1 item)

2013-03-14 13:49:59,858:delete from table where id in (?)
2013-03-14 13:50:01,460:delete from table where id in (?)
2013-03-14 13:50:03,040:delete from table where id in (?)
2013-03-14 13:50:04,544:delete from table where id in (?)
2013-03-14 13:50:06,125:delete from table where id in (?)
2013-03-14 13:50:07,707:delete from table where id in (?)
2013-03-14 13:50:09,275:delete from table where id in (?)
2013-03-14 13:50:10,833:delete from table where id in (?)
2013-03-14 13:50:12,369:delete from table where id in (?)
2013-03-14 13:50:13,873:delete from table where id in (?)

Both are IDs that exists in the table and should be sequential.


EXPLAIN ANALYZE of DELETE FROM table WHERE id = 3774887;

Delete on table  (cost=0.00..8.31 rows=1 width=6) (actual time=0.097..0.097 rows=0 loops=1)
  ->  Index Scan using pk_table on table  (cost=0.00..8.31 rows=1 width=6) (actual time=0.055..0.058 rows=1 loops=1)
        Index Cond: (id = 3774887)
Total runtime: 0.162 ms

EXPLAIN ANALYZE of DELETE FROM table WHERE id IN (3774887);

Delete on table  (cost=0.00..8.31 rows=1 width=6) (actual time=0.279..0.279 rows=0 loops=1)
  ->  Index Scan using pk_table on table  (cost=0.00..8.31 rows=1 width=6) (actual time=0.210..0.213 rows=1 loops=1)
        Index Cond: (id = 3774887)
Total runtime: 0.452 ms

0.162 vs 0.452 considered significant difference?

EDIT:

Set batch size to 50,000 and Hibernate didn't like that idea:

java.lang.StackOverflowError
        at org.hibernate.hql.ast.util.NodeTraverser.visitDepthFirst(NodeTraverser.java:40)
        at org.hibernate.hql.ast.util.NodeTraverser.visitDepthFirst(NodeTraverser.java:41)
        at org.hibernate.hql.ast.util.NodeTraverser.visitDepthFirst(NodeTraverser.java:42)
....
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It seems that when you delete single row it uses other index. Can you check it? –  ntalbs Mar 14 '13 at 0:51
    
I've added information about single row by row deletes. The MAX(id) of the table is 3774904, so I just picked a number larger. I tried the same with an ID below 3774904 but wasn't in the table and got similar results (similar results for an ID in the table). –  nevets1219 Mar 14 '13 at 17:23
1  
yes, 0.162 vs 0.452 is significant since 0.452 is almost 3 times longer than 0.162. It is particularly interesting that the explain suggests that they are doing the same thing a well. I would raise this with the postgresql team. The pgsql-general is probably a good place –  drone.ah Mar 20 '13 at 9:43

2 Answers 2

Ok, the first thing you have to note is that SQL has to get converted into a plan in some way. Your EXPLAIN results suggest that the logic here is fundamentally different for an equality compared to an IN(vals) construct.

WHERE id = 1;

Is transformed to a simple equality filter.

WHERE id IN (1);

Is transformed into an array match of:

WHERE id = ANY(ARRAY[1]);

Apparently the planner is not smart enough to notice that these are mathematically identical where an array has exactly one member. So what it's doing is planning for an array of any size which is why you get the nested loop bitmap index scan.

What's interesting here is not just that it is slower but that performance holds out better for the most part. So with one member in the in() clause, it is 40 times slower, and with 10000 members, it is only 170 times slower, but that also means that the 10000 member version is also 50 times faster than 10000 separate index scans on id.

So what is happening here is that the planner is selecting a plan which performs better when there are a large number of id's checked but performs more poorly when there are only a few.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll try to increase the array size and report back what happens! Are there general guidelines for picking batch sizes? –  nevets1219 Mar 20 '13 at 16:58
    
Seems Hibernate didn't like 50,000 (gave stack overflow error) –  nevets1219 Mar 21 '13 at 22:05
    
Re-read what you wrote - I tried both WHERE id = 1; (we'll call this A) and WHERE id IN (1); (we'll call this B) and the latter is slower. If I'm understanding you correctly when executing A it is the same as executing B but when executing B, a different plan (one that favors large list of IDs) could be used in execution (in other words B isn't equal to A). I've executed both A and B and they generate the same plan, maybe Hibernate is doing something to it? –  nevets1219 Mar 21 '13 at 23:28

If the problem here really boils down to "how do I delete a lot of records as quickly as possible?" then the DELETE ... IN() method is going to be superior to deletions for each individual row, so pursuing the reasons why IN(?) with a single member appears to be slower than =? is not going to help you.

It may be worth exploring the use of a temporary table to hold all of the id's that you want to delete, then running a single delete.

If it's not too costly, arranging that the id's in the list are in ascending order may be helpful for very large delete performance. Don't bother if you have to go sorting them, but if there's a way of ensuring that each batch of deletes addresses id's that are clustered in the same area of the index may be slightly beneficial.

In any case, it looks to me like the indexes are being used and the same plan generated in both cases, so I wonder if there's actually a query parsing and optimisation issue here, rather than an issue with the delete action itself. I don't know enough about the internals to be sure I'm afraid.

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