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I have some problem with UTF-8 conding. I have read some posts here but still it does not work properly somehow.

That is my code:

#!/bin/env ruby
#encoding: utf-8

def determine
  file=File.open("/home/lala.txt")          
  file.each do |line|           
    puts(line)
    type = line.match(/DOG/)
    puts('aaaaa')

    if type != nil 
      puts(type[0])
      break
    end        

  end
end

That are the first 3 lines of my file :

;?lalalalal60000065535-1362490443-0000006334-0000018467-0000000041en-lalalalallalalalalalalalaln Cell Generation
text/lalalalala1.0.0.1515
text/lalalala�DOG

When I run this code it shows me an error exactly when reading the third line of the file (where the word dog stands):

;?lalalalal60000065535-1362490443-0000006334-0000018467-0000000041en-lalalalallalalalalalalalaln Cell Generation
aaaaa

text/lalalalala1.0.0.1515
aaaaa

text/lalalala�DOG
/home/kik/Desktop/determine2.rb:16:in `match': invalid byte sequence in UTF-8 (ArgumentError)

BUT: if I run just a a determine function with the following content:

#!/bin/env ruby
#encoding: utf-8

    def determine
    type="text/lalalala�DOG".match(/DOG/)
    puts(type)
end

it works perfectly.

What is going wrong there? Thanks in advance!

EDIT: The third line in the file is:

text/lalalal»DOG

BUT when I print the thirf line of the file in ruby it shows up like:

text/lalalala�DOG

EDIT2:

This format was also developed to support localization. Strings stored within the file are stored as 2 byte UNICODE characters.The format of the file is a binary file with data stored in network byte order (big-endian format).

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure that character is UTF-8? It shows up as unknown for me. What's the code? –  Linuxios Mar 14 '13 at 2:22
    
@Linuxios if I run the code without #encoding :utf-8 I still recieve an error message with "invalid byte sequence in UTF-8" and if I run the code type="text/lalalala�DOG".match(/DOG/) it works –  Tonja Mar 14 '13 at 2:28
    
What's the character code? –  Linuxios Mar 14 '13 at 2:33
1  
In your comment that character shows up as invalid for me. If you have invalid UTF-8 sequences, the string is damaged and some methods will generate exceptions like this. –  tadman Mar 14 '13 at 2:33
1  
If you can determine the encoding of the file, you can open it the correct way. It might be ISO-1252 or ISO-8859-1. If I put » in a file, in UTF-8 it encodes to bytes [197, 187], not what you got. What you have is probably invalid. –  tadman Mar 14 '13 at 4:02

3 Answers 3

Simple Solution for less number of files:

@Katja open the file in some text editor and click on save as option and change its format to UTF-8 and click OK. pop up will be displayed to replace or create new. Replace existing file and you are on.

share|improve this answer

I believe @Amadan is close, but has it backwards. I'd do this:

File.open("/home/lala.txt", "r:ASCII-8BIT")

The character is not valid UTF-8, but for your purposes, it looks like 8-bit ASCII will work fine. My understanding is that Ruby is using that encoding by default when you just use the string, which is why that works.

Update: Based on your most recent comment, it sounds like this is what you need:

File.open("/home/lala.txt", "rb:UTF-16BE")
share|improve this answer
    
It works, I mean I do not receive an error message BUT type = line.match(/DOG/) does not work. It does not find a word DOG in a file. –  Tonja Mar 14 '13 at 3:22
    
Ah, right. Had to be something about encodings. –  Amadan Mar 14 '13 at 6:21
    
did not work :5:in initialize': ASCII incompatible encoding needs binmode (ArgumentError) from /home/kik/Desktop/determine2.rb:5:in open' –  Tonja Mar 14 '13 at 18:19
    
@Katja: I think that means you need a b in there; I just updated my answer to reflect this. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Mar 14 '13 at 18:22
    
@DarshanComputing error again: `match': invalid byte sequence in UTF-16BE (ArgumentError) –  Tonja Mar 14 '13 at 18:35

Try using this:

File.open("/home/lala.txt", "r:UTF-8")

There seems to be an issue with wrong encoding being used at some stage. #encoding :utf specifies only the encoding of the source file, which affects how the literal string is interpreted, and has no effect on the encoding that File.open uses.

share|improve this answer
    
I still get the same error –  Tonja Mar 14 '13 at 3:01
    

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