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Assume we need to list four numbers A, B, C, and D. The sum of A+B+C+D is 10 and the value of each number is in the range of [0, 10].

Find all the possible combination.

The brute-force way is as follows:

for (int A = 0; A <=10; ++A)
  for (int B = 0; B <=10-A; ++B)
  {
   if (A + B > 10) break;    
   for (int C = 0; C <=10-A-B; ++C)
   {
    if (A + B + C > 10) break;
    for (int D = 0; D <=10-A-B-C; ++D)
    {
       if (A + B + C + D == 10)
       {
         cout << "A: " << A << ",B: " << B << ",C: " << C << ",D: " << D << endl;
         break;
       }
       else if (A + B + C + D > 10)
         break;
    }
   }
  }

Q> Is there a better solution?

FYI: code is updated based on suggestion from @rici

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1  
Does 7,1,1,1 count or do the numbers need to be unique? Is 1,2,3,4 considered same as 2,1,3,4 or no? Perhaps it doesn't matter? –  angelatlarge Mar 14 '13 at 1:53
1  
The phrase to search for is "integer partition" (or "composition" if you care about order.) Most definitions exclude zeros but that's easy enough to work around. –  DSM Mar 14 '13 at 2:01
2  
for a start, it should be obvious that you can replace for (int D = 0; D <=10; ++D) { if (A + B + C + D == 10) with D = 10 - (A + B + C) at a considerable saving of time. –  rici Mar 14 '13 at 2:01
    
order does matter since the sequence is for [A, B, C, D]. –  q0987 Mar 14 '13 at 2:11
    
@q: you don't need those if statements since they mirror the condition in the preceding for statement. And you still needlessly iterate D from 0 until it reaches the only possible value. But you're almost there. –  rici Mar 14 '13 at 2:31

2 Answers 2

You are asking for a method to enumerate the partitions of an integer. The linked wikipedia page lays out a few ways of doing that.

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What about something like this:

void print4Partitions(int num) {
    for (int A=1; A<num-3; A++) {
        for (int B=A+1; B<num-A-2; B++) {
            for (int C=B+1; C<num-(A+B)-1; C++) {
                int D = num-A-B-C;
                printf("%d %d %d %d\n", A, B, C, D);
            }
        }
    }
}

The main ideas here are:

  • You really don't need to loop over the last number: it can be simply computed, as @nci mentions, as A, B, C, and the number to be partitions uniquely determine D.
  • You can limit your loops instead of testing and using break statements, which should result in faster code.
share|improve this answer
    
As far as I can tell, this code would only ever give {1 2 3 4}, since it doesn't allow repeated numbers, eg {2 2 2 4}. You're also assuming that order doesn't matter, eg {1 3 2 4}, where the OP said it did(in a comment). The bulleted points are good, though. –  Geobits Mar 14 '13 at 18:29

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