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I'm having some troubles with this exercise that I'm working on. Basically with this function void check(char *tel, char *c) the first value of the array must be the number 2 and the others 8 must be a number between 0 and 9. If the conditions are met it will print V, otherwise it will print F.

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<ctype.h>

void check(char *tel, char *c){

int i;

if(*tel!=2) printf("Error\n"); 
                *c='F';
                return;  //I guess this return is wrong

if(*tel==2)
    for(i=0;tel[i]<9;i++){
        if(isdigit(tel[i]));

                   else{
               printf("Error!\n");
               *c='F';
               break;
                               return;}         //this one might be in bad use too

    }
 else

 *c='V';           //having troubles here.. i'm not seeing a way to fix this
 }

 int main(){

 char number[9]={2,3,4,5,6,7,4,5,3};
 char car;


 check(number,&car);

 printf("%c \n", car);

     system("pause");
}
share|improve this question
1  
This is C code, not C++. –  FatalError Mar 14 '13 at 2:22
    
you have an else with a for...If you want to use if...else you need to open and close it. This is only one problem, you have more there and this is C, not c++. –  Fabio Cardoso Mar 14 '13 at 2:23
    
No, there is not an else with a for. How can people expect to read code that is anti-formatted? –  Jim Balter Mar 14 '13 at 2:31
    
Running with Visual Studio it wont give any error.. it runs compiling as a cpp file.. –  Ricardo Costa Mar 14 '13 at 2:32
2  
@JimBalter I've rolled the code back to the original version because I think the poor formatting is relevant to the question. –  John Kugelman Mar 14 '13 at 2:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You're missing curly braces around many of your if and else blocks. Properly indenting and formatting your code would go a long way.

if(*tel!=2) printf("Error\n"); *c='F'; return;

For instance, the above should be:

if (*tel != 2) {
    printf("Error\n");
    *c = 'F';
    return;
}

Please, please, please: indent your code properly.


Edit: To be more explicit, here's how your code looks after it's been reformatted. Do you see the errors now, the places where you're missing curly braces?

Hint: I've marked lines that should have them with a /*******/ comment.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>

void check (char *tel, char *c) {
    int i;

    if (*tel != 2)                          /*******/
        printf("Error\n"); 

    *c = 'F';
    return;

    if (*tel == 2)                          /*******/
        for (i = 0; tel[i] < 9; i++) {
            if (isdigit(tel[i]))            /*******/
                ;
            else {
                printf("Error!\n");
                *c = 'F';
                break;
                return;
            }
        }
    else                                    /*******/
        *c = 'V';
}

int main() {
    char number[9] = {2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 4, 5, 3};
    char car;

    check(number, &car);

    printf("%c \n", car);

    system("pause");
}
share|improve this answer
    
thats just an indentation problem.. the problem isnt up there but on the las lines of the funtion :( –  Ricardo Costa Mar 14 '13 at 2:25
    
The problem is there.. you didn't open the IF so.. you can't use the else statement after open the bracket on the for. Try it before tell us that is not the problem. –  Fabio Cardoso Mar 14 '13 at 2:28
    
@RicardoCosta What does "just an indentation problem" mean? This is C, not Python. Try looking at the code ... it always sets *c = 'F' and returns. Here's a clue: you have a rep of 22, John has a rep of 64.7k ... which of you is more likely to be right? –  Jim Balter Mar 14 '13 at 2:36
    
Well yes, but it doesen't work neither.. the array that i have should be good and print 'V' not 'F' . –  Ricardo Costa Mar 14 '13 at 2:40
    
@RicardoCosta I didn't fix your code. I just reformatted it to highlight the errors in it. –  John Kugelman Mar 14 '13 at 2:41

There are a lot of small problems with the code you have posted. This is the most immediately obvious to me:

if(*tel!=2) printf("Error\n"); *c='F'; return;  //I guess this return is wrong

Since you have decided not to use curly braces to segment off the if-branch logic, only the first statement - printf("Error\n"); is considered to be associated with your if check. That means that in every execution, the value of c will be set to 'F' and the function will return. The compiler sees this as:

if (*tel != 2) { 
  printf("Error\n");
}
*c = 'F';
return;
// The rest is ignored

You should explicitly use curly braces to mark if branches until you are quite comfortable with the definition of a statement in C++!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip Don ;) –  Ricardo Costa Mar 19 '13 at 4:18
    
Can you please give me a vote up please? –  Ricardo Costa Mar 19 '13 at 4:18

Why does it keep printing 'F' instead of 'V'!?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <ctype.h>

void check (char *tel, char *c){
int i=0;

if (*tel!=2){              
    printf("Error\n");          
    *c='F';
    return;
}
while(i<9){

    if(isdigit(tel[i])!=0){
        *c='V';
        printf("Good\n!");
    }
    else{
        *c='F';
        printf("Fail\n");
    }
    i++;
}
}

int main() {
char number[9] = {2, 2, 3, 6, 4, 4, 5, 3, 5};
char car;

check(number, &car);

printf("%c \n", car);

system("pause");
}
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