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"I am sure there are tens of questions with the same title. Many of them are duplicate. Mine might be duplicate too, but I couldn't find any. So I try to make it very neat, short and simple."

I have an hierarchy like this:

class Shape {
public:
   virtual void virtualfunc()  { std::cout << "In shape\n"; }
};

class Circle: public Shape {
public:
   void virtualfunc()  { std::cout << "In Circle\n"; };
};

and when I use the classes with the help of pointer, the functions are called as I expected:

int main() {
   Shape shape_instance;
   Shape* ref_shape = &shape_instance ;
   Circle circle_instance;
   Circle* ref_circle = &circle_instance;

   ref_shape = dynamic_cast<Shape*> (ref_circle);
   ref_shape->virtualfunc();
}

Here the program calls the virtualfunc() of the derived class and the result is naturally : In Circle

Now, I want to get rid of the pointers, use references instead, and get the same result. So I make trivial modifications to main() to look like this:

int main() {
   Shape shape_instance;
   Shape& ref_shape = shape_instance;
   Circle circle_instance;
   Circle& ref_circle = circle_instance;

   ref_shape = dynamic_cast<Shape&>(ref_circle);
   ref_shape.virtualfunc();
}

But this time, the program calls the virtualfunc() of the base class and the result is : In Shape

I appreciate if you let me know which concept of the references I am missing and how to change the references in the main() to get the result I got in the pointer version.

thank you

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Why did you declare ref_shape again at this line Shape& ref_shape = dynamic_cast<Shape&>(ref_circle);? –  taocp Mar 14 '13 at 3:56
    
sorry, a typo. I will just edit that –  rahman Mar 14 '13 at 3:57
1  
There is no need to dynamic_cast to the base, that is an implicit conversion. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 14 '13 at 4:09
    
In short, I missed the concept that references cannot be reassigned!!! thank you all –  rahman Mar 14 '13 at 4:25
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4 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

References cannot be reseated. Once you initialize the reference in the initialization, it becomes an alias to the referred object and cannot be distinguished from it. The latter assignment:

ref_shape = dynamic_cast<Shape&>(ref_circle);

really means:

shape_instance = dynamic_cast<Shape&>(ref_circle);

You can, on the other hand, bind a new reference to the object (and you don't need the dynamic_cast, as the conversion from reference to derived to reference to base is implicit):

Shape & another_ref = ref_circle;
another_ref.virtualfunc();          // Dispatches to Circle::virtualfunc
share|improve this answer
    
+1. This is the first answer that also explains this: ideone.com/8GJ5W5 –  Carl Mar 14 '13 at 4:14
    
@David thanks. This is also correct –  rahman Mar 14 '13 at 4:17
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This is where your Circle is turning into a Shape.

ref_shape = dynamic_cast<Shape&>(ref_circle);
//        ^ here
ref_shape.virtualfunc();

ref_shape has already been defined to be a reference to shape_instance.

You are not copying the reference itself, since references cannot be reassigned. You are copying the actual object to a Shape object. It's getting stored in shape_instance.

You can verify this by trying this code. It will print In Circle.

dynamic_cast<Shape&>(ref_circle).virtualfunc();
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1  
@rahman Note there is no need for dynamic_cast in your situation, if I correctly understand what you're trying to do. –  Jorge Israel Peña Mar 14 '13 at 4:17
    
@JorgeIsraelPeña you are right –  rahman Mar 14 '13 at 4:19
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You should do the following:

#include <iostream>

 class Shape {
  public:
   virtual void virtualfunc()  { std::cout << "In shape\n"; }
 };

 class Circle: public Shape {
   public:
   void virtualfunc()  { std::cout << "In Circle\n"; };
 };

 int main() {
    Shape shape_instance;
    //Shape& ref_shape = shape_instance;
    Circle circle_instance;
    Circle& ref_circle = circle_instance;

    Shape& ref_shape = dynamic_cast<Shape&>(ref_circle);
    ref_shape.virtualfunc();
}

It outputs in Circle as you expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I am sorry again. i corrected the error. Kindly have a look. thanks –  rahman Mar 14 '13 at 4:01
    
@rahman no problem. –  taocp Mar 14 '13 at 4:04
    
nice. But why? what I can see is that ref_shape calls the virtual function of the object that is 'first' assigned to it.is this a correct explaination? –  rahman Mar 14 '13 at 4:12
    
@rahman the explanation has been given in Drew's post below. –  taocp Mar 14 '13 at 4:14
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If I understand correctly what you're trying to achieve/show (i.e. dynamic virtual function binding), perhaps this code will help:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Shape {
  public:
    virtual void virtualfunc()  { std::cout << "In shape\n"; }
};

class Circle: public Shape {
  public:
    void virtualfunc()  { std::cout << "In Circle\n"; };
};

int main() {
  Circle circle_instance;

  // don't care what kind of Shape
  Shape &someShape = circle_instance;

  someShape.virtualfunc();
}

Here you can see that someShape can be bound to Shape or any derived class and the virtual function will be called on the actual dynamic type. This will print In Circle. Proof: http://ideone.com/A1UvrR

There's no need for dynamic_cast

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, it was a typo. I made the modification. please have a look. thanks –  rahman Mar 14 '13 at 3:58
    
@rahman see edit –  Jorge Israel Peña Mar 14 '13 at 4:01
    
That is what confuses me. when I assign a circle(through dynamic cast), I expected to call the circle methods(as it does in the pointer version) why is this not hapening? –  rahman Mar 14 '13 at 4:04
    
@rahman please see my new edit. –  Jorge Israel Peña Mar 14 '13 at 4:13
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