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It turns out in Jetty, when you attach a cookie, it not only adds a cookie to the HTTP response header, it also alters the value of the Expires HTTP header!

((HttpServletResponse)response).addCookie(cookie);

I need Jetty to stop screwing around with the correct/proper expiry settings.

On a side note, Is there a particular/good reason for it to be behaving like this? My guess is that Jetty is assuming that if a cookie has been set, the content is always dynamic, and hence should be set to expired so that it is not cached.

Update: Testing this using Jetty 8.1.8.v20121106

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what if you add cookie first, then set Expires. will jetty still mess around with it? –  bayou.io Mar 14 '13 at 4:03
    
What version of Jetty are you using? –  Perception Mar 14 '13 at 4:04
    
Doh! I meant to add the jetty version, but forgot, im using what was latest as of last month, (Jetty 8.1.8.v20121106). I should check if there is a newer release (Cant wait for 9 to come out) –  Jacob Mar 14 '13 at 4:06
    
The Eclipse website lists version 9 being stable. –  asgs Mar 14 '13 at 4:09
    
It appears you can't_ re-adjust the headers after the cookie has been added. –  Jacob Mar 14 '13 at 4:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Just took a walk through the Jetty 8 codebase. Here are the situations in the codebase where Expires (as a HTTP Response header) is forced to a value, or removed if present.

  • Any HTTP 206 response (forced removal, per RFC2616 spec)
  • Use of org.eclipse.jetty.server.handler.MovedContextHandler (forced if unset)
  • During Form Authentication, if the need to respond with an error, via Dispatch handling (forced removal)
  • During a Form Authentication challenge response (forced removal)

That's it for Expires as a HTTP Response Header.

However, since you pointed this out as a part of .addCookie(), I'd like to point out that there is also a Cookie spec Expires header, as part of the Cookie value string, found in the Set-Cookie logic on a response.

This will force the Cookie Expires header if the Cookie.setMaxAge() value is 0 or greater. This is done to work around various browser bugs that do not honor Max-Age= until Expires= is also provided on the Cookie value.

Default behavior of Cookie:

  • Cookie.setMaxAge(-1); will disable both Max-Age= and Expires=
  • Cookie.setMaxAge(0); will result in Expires=00:00:00 UTC on 1 January 1970 (start of unix epoch)
  • Cookie.setMaxAge(60000); will result in a Expires= 1 minute in the future.

Version 1 Cookie behavior (aka Cookie.setVersion(1)):

  • Cookie.setMaxAge(-1); will disable both Max-Age= and Expires=
  • Cookie.setMaxAge(0); will result in Max-Age=0 and Expires=00:00:00 UTC on 1 January 1970 (start of unix epoch)
  • Cookie.setMaxAge(60000); will result in Max-Age=60000 and a Expires= 1 minute in the future.
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Awesome! I assumed there would be some quirk that caused this behavior to be built in. Wish I could upvote you more (: –  Jacob Mar 15 '13 at 4:26
    
Isn't it in seconds? ie 60000 would be 1000 minutes rather than 1 minute? –  Thomas Nov 25 '14 at 13:32

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