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I have writen a code to split the string with multiple char delimiter.

It is working fine for first time of calling to this function

but i calling it second time it retuns the correct word with some unwanted symbol.

I think this problem occurs because of not clearing the buffer.I have tried a lot but cant solve this. please help me to solve this problem.

char **split(char *phrase, char *delimiter) {
    int i = 0;
    char **arraylist= malloc(10 *sizeof(char *));
    char *loc1=NULL;
    char *loc=NULL;
    loc1 = phrase;
    while (loc1 != NULL) {
    loc = strstr(loc1, delimiter);
    if (loc == NULL) {
            arraylist[i]=malloc(sizeof(loc1));
            arraylist[i]=loc1;
            break;
    }
    char *buf = malloc(sizeof(char) * 256);    // memory for 256 char
    int length = strlen(delimiter);
    strncpy(buf, loc1, loc-loc1);
    arraylist[i]=malloc(sizeof(buf));
    arraylist[i]=buf;
    i++;
    loc = loc+length;
    loc1 = loc;
}
return arraylist;
}

called this function first time

char **splitdetails = split("100000000<delimit>0<delimit>hellooo" , "<delimit>");

It gives

splitdetails[0]=100000000
splitdetails[1]=0
splitdetails[2]=hellooo

but i called this second time

char **splitdetails = split("20000000<delimit>10<delimit>testing" , "<delimit>");

splitdetails[0]=20000000��������������������������
splitdetails[1]=10����
splitdetails[2]=testing

Update:-

thanks to @fatelerror. i have change my code as

    char** split(char *phrase, char *delimiter) {
    int i = 0;
    char **arraylist = malloc(10 *sizeof(char *));
    char *loc1=NULL;
    char *loc=NULL;
    loc1 = phrase;
    while (loc1 != NULL) {
    loc = strstr(loc1, delimiter);
    if (loc == NULL) {
            arraylist[i]=malloc(strlen(loc1) + 1);
            strcpy(arraylist[i], loc1);
            break;
    }
    char *buf = malloc(sizeof(char) * 256);    // memory for 256 char
    int length = strlen(delimiter);
    strncpy(buf, loc1, loc-loc1);
    buf[loc - loc1] = '\0';
    arraylist[i]=malloc(strlen(buf));
    strcpy(arraylist[i], buf);
    i++;
    loc = loc+length;
    loc1 = loc;
   }
}  

In the caller function, i used it as

char *id
char **splitdetails = split("20000000<delimit>10<delimit>testing" , "<delimit>");
id = splitdetails[0];
//some works done with id
//free the split details with this code.
for(int i=0;i<3;i++) {
    free(domaindetails[i]);
}free(domaindetails);
domaindetails=NULL;    

then i called the same for the second as,

char **splitdetails1= split("10000000<delimit>1000<delimit>testing1" , "<delimit>");

it makes error and i can't free the function.

thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your problem boils down to three basic things:

  1. sizeof is not strlen()
  2. Assignment doesn't copy strings in C.
  3. strncpy() doesn't always nul-terminate strings.

So, when you say something like:

arraylist[i]=malloc(sizeof(loc1));
arraylist[i]=loc1;

thisdoes not copy the string. The first one allocates the size of loc1, which is a char *. In other words, you allocated the size of a pointer. You want to allocate storage to store the string, i.e. using strlen():

arraylist[i]=malloc(strlen(loc1) + 1);

Note the + 1 as well, because you also need room for the nul-terminator. Then, to copy the string you want to use strcpy():

strcpy(arraylist[i], loc1);

The way you had it was just assigning a pointer to your old string (and in the process leaing the memory you had just allocated). It's also common to use strdup() which combines both of these steps, i.e.

arraylist[i] = strdup(loc1);

This is convenient but strdup() is not part of the official C library. You need to assess the portability needs of your code before you consider using it.

Additionally, with strncpy(), you should be aware that it does not always nul-terminate:

strncpy(buf, loc1, loc-loc1);

This copies less bytes than were in the original string and doesn't terminate buf. Thus, it's necessary to include a nul terminator yourself:

buf[loc - loc1] = '\0';

This is the root cause of what you are seeing with the garbage. Since you didn't nul terminate, C doesn't know where your string ends and so it keeps on reading whatever happens to be in memory.

share|improve this answer
    
strdup is part of the POSIX standard; you can expect it to be available whereever people care about POSIX –  FUZxxl Mar 14 '13 at 6:33
    
Thank you so much @FatelError. Now it is working fine:) –  RSK Mar 14 '13 at 7:18
    
Is it necessary to free the arraylist in this function. if so., please tell me how to clear that string array. –  RSK Mar 18 '13 at 14:34
    
You probably don't want to free it in that function, because you are returning it as a result. Usually in this case, you pass off ownership to the caller, and it becomes the caller's responsibility to properly clean up after it. You probably also want to have some way for the caller to know she's hit the last string, like by setting the last index to NULL. You could provide a utility function for freeing it to make the caller's job easier. –  FatalError Mar 18 '13 at 20:07

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