Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My first post :), am starting out with C language as basic learning step into programming arena. I am using following code which reads string from text file, makes directory with that string name and opens a file for writing in that created directory. But am not able to create a file inside directory made, here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <direct.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    char file_name[25], cwd[100];
    FILE *fp, *op;

    fp = fopen("myfile.txt", "r");

    if (fp == NULL)
    {
        perror("Error while opening the file.\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

    fgets(file_name, 25, fp);

    _mkdir(file_name);

       if (_getcwd(cwd,sizeof(cwd)) != 0) 
    {
      fprintf(stdout, "Your dir name: %s\\%s\n", cwd,file_name);

        op = fopen("cwd\\file_name\\mynewfile.txt","w");
        fclose(op);
    }
    fclose(fp);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
What is the function _mkdir? What does the header direct.h do? –  FUZxxl Mar 14 '13 at 6:16
    
What do you type in for the directory name (in filename)? Also you should fopen a string you have generated e.g. with sprintf from the cwd and filename; –  Aki Suihkonen Mar 14 '13 at 6:17
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you need is to store the file name (with the path) in a c-string before opening. What you are opening is cwd\file_name\mynewfile.txt. I doubt that your directory is named cwd. A sample could could be:

char file_path[150];
sprintf(file_path, "%s\\%s\\mynewfile.txt", cwd, file_name);
op = fopen(file_path,"w");
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot, its working :) –  abhi abhi Mar 14 '13 at 6:30
1  
You shoul use snprintf instead, pass the buffer size so you are sure that it doesn't overflow. –  LtWorf Mar 14 '13 at 6:48
1  
With cwd and file_name being arrays of size 100 and 25 respectively, if there was a buffer overflow to be had, it would have occurred before these statements. –  uba Mar 14 '13 at 6:50
add comment

use

#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <sys/types.h>

instead of

#include <direct.h>

and modify

op = fopen("cwd\\file_name\\mynewfile.txt","w”);
share|improve this answer
    
can I know why we need to use stat and types header files instead of direct ? –  abhi abhi Mar 14 '13 at 6:42
2  
Because direct.h is a Windows specific extension and not portable –  FUZxxl Mar 14 '13 at 9:23
add comment

I see you are using the return values. That is a good start for a beginner. You can refine your error messages by including "errno.h". Instead of printing your own error messages call

printf("%s", strerror(errno));

You get more precise error messages that way.

share|improve this answer
add comment

op = fopen("cwd\\file_name\\mynewfile.txt","w”);

You’re actually passing the string literals “cwd” and “file_name” as part of the path of the file, when I think you actually mean to put the contents of the variables with those names in there. You will probably have to piece together a string for the path. Try looking into strcat()

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstring/strcat/

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.