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I'm trying to puzzle out Apache handlers. The official documentation has the following example:

The following directives will cause requests for files with the html extension to trigger the launch of the footer.pl CGI script.

Action add-footer /cgi-bin/footer.pl
AddHandler add-footer .html

Then the CGI script is responsible for sending the originally requested document (pointed to by the PATH_TRANSLATED environment variable) and making whatever modifications or additions are desired.

I try to follow this example. My directory set up is:

  • /var/www/testsite/index.html
  • /var/www/testsite/cgi-bin/rp.sh

My virtual host file is:

<VirtualHost *:80>
       ServerName http://localhost-testsite
       DocumentRoot /var/www/testsite
       <Directory /var/www/testsite>
               Action footer /cgi-bin/rp.sh
               AddHandler footer .html
       </Directory>
       ErrorLog /var/www/logs/error-testsite.log
</VirtualHost>

If I understood the documentation correctly, when an html file is requested, my rp.sh script should be called with PATH_TRANSLATED variable set to the html file name. However, when I open localhost-testsite/index.html in my browser, I get an unexpected error:

[Thu Mar 14 15:38:18 2013] [error] [client 127.0.0.1] File does not exist: /var/www/testsite/cgi-bin/rp.sh/index.html

Am I missing something? The most important question is: how can I make a cgi script process all files with a certain extension?

Apache version is Apache/2.2.22 (Ubuntu). All files and dirs have 777 permission.

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1  
I think the problem is that you also have to configure rp.sh to be a valid CGI script, although I'm not sure. Make sure that you have ScriptAlias /cgi-bin/ /var/www/testsite/cgi-bin/ in your Apache configuration. –  rra Mar 18 '13 at 0:46

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