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I apologize for the simplicity of this question, it's just past 3AM and I can't think :)

I need to get a random number n between 0.25 and 10.0, however I need P( 0.25 <= n < 1.0 ) == P( 1.0 < n <= 10.0 ) && n != 1.0.

Right now my current code is biased towards 1.0 <= n <= 10.0 like so:

Double n = new Random().NextDouble(); // 0 <= n <= 1.0
n = 0.25 + (10.0 * n);

Of course this also has a bug where n == 10.25 if n = 1.0 initially.

Ta!

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

If I understand correctly, you want this:

var random = new Random();
Double n1 = random.NextDouble(); // 0 <= n < 1.0
Double n = random.NextDouble(); // 0 <= n < 1.0
if (n1 < 0.5)
    n = 0.25 + 0.75 * n; // 0.25 <= n < 1.0
else
    n = 10.0 - 9.0 * n; // 1 < n <= 10
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Smart way of not having to faff around with Epsilons! – Tim Rogers Mar 14 '13 at 10:20

This function should work:

double GetRandomValue(Random rand)
{
    return rand.Next(0, 2) == 0 
           ? 0.25 + 0.75 * rand.NextDouble() 
           : 10.0 - 9.0 * rand.NextDouble();
}

First random value selects whether you should use values below or above 1. For values above 1, you wanted to include 10.0 in the range, hence the subtraction.

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I think this is it.

Double n = new Random().NextDouble();
n = n < 0.5? (0.25 + (0.75 * n * 2)) : 1.0 + double.Epsilon + (9.0 * n * 2);

The double.Epsilon ensures you don't get n=1.0 since NextDouble() produces 0 <= n < 1.0.

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Double n = new Random().NextDouble(); // 0 <= n <= 1.0
Double extremlySmallValue = 0.00000001;
n *= 9.75; // 0 <= n <= 9.75
n += 0.25; // 0.25 <= n <= 10.0
//few ifs now:
if(n == 10.0)
    n -= extremlySmallValue;
else if (n==1.0)
    n += extremlySmallValue;

Its not perfect linear distribution, but i think its acceptable, because Random does not provide perfect linear distribution too.. You can also make another NextDouble() when you get 1.0 or 10.0

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You don't say what distribution you want within each range, however, assuming you want uniformity, just linearly map the bottom half of NextDouble's range to your lower range, and the top half to the top range.

However, there's a little thought required with getting the half-openness of your target intervals right. NextDouble returns a double in [0, 1) (that is, lower-inclusive and upper-exclusive). We can split this in half to [0, 0.5) and [0.5, 1) but then since your required upper range is (1, 10], we should flip the upper range during the transform.

var n = myRandom.NextDouble();
if (n < 0.5)
{
    // Map from [0, 0.5) to [0.25, 1.0)
    return 0.25 + (n * 1.5);
}
else
{
    // Map from [0.5, 1.0) to (1.0, 10] by reversing the input range
    var flipped = 1.0 - n;
    // Now flipped is in [0.5, 0), which is to say (0, 0.5]
    // So scale up by 18 times to get a value in (0, 9], and shift
    return 1 + (flipped * 18);
}
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