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In heroku, each redis provider (myredis, redistogo, redisgreen, openredis) specifies the number of connections to the redis instance for each plan they provide.

What does this number mean? Is it the number of webservers connected to the instance or the number of end users who are using a webapp and changing data around?

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Don't forget to validate an answer, thanks! –  FGRibreau Mar 25 '13 at 22:43
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2 Answers 2

What does this number mean? Is it the number of webservers connected to the instance ?

It's the number of sockets connected to Redis. A Redis client library can connects to Redis with one socket or with a pool of sockets (a.k.a connections). So what really matters is how many sockets are connected through Redis at the same time.

To get more information about whose connected to your Redis database, use the CLIENT LIST (v2.4.0+) command and you should get something like this:

redis 127.0.0.1:6379> client list
addr=127.0.0.1:37219 fd=6 name= age=672320 idle=216 flags=N db=0 sub=0 psub=0 multi=-1 qbuf=0 qbuf-free=0 obl=0 oll=0 omem=0 events=r cmd=info
addr=10.90.20.10:6379 fd=7 name= age=665888 idle=2 flags=M db=0 sub=0 psub=0 multi=-1 qbuf=0 qbuf-free=0 obl=0 oll=0 omem=0 events=r cmd=exec
addr=10.90.20.12:42266 fd=5 name= age=325274 idle=2 flags=N db=0 sub=0 psub=0 multi=-1 qbuf=0 qbuf-free=0 obl=0 oll=0 omem=0 events=r cmd=evalsha
addr=127.0.0.1:51897 fd=8 name= age=3447 idle=0 flags=N db=0 sub=0 psub=0 multi=-1 qbuf=0 qbuf-free=32768 obl=0 oll=0 omem=0 events=r cmd=client
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I work at redistogo, this is the correct answer. +1 for the use of the client list command. –  mogramer Apr 29 at 4:54
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Most DB adapters create a 'pool' of connections to a database that they can use.

This recent post from Heroku https://devcenter.heroku.com/articles/concurrency-and-database-connections explains it in far more detail than I could.

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